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In the pines : a lynching, a lie, a reckoning

by Grace Elizabeth Hale

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An award-winning scholar of white supremacy tackles her toughest research assignment yet: the unsolved murder of a black man in rural Mississippi while her grandfather was the local sheriff--a cold case that sheds new light on the hidden legacy of racial terror in America.
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I picked this book up from the new books shelf of my local library at the same time I picked up The Blueprint. While The Blueprint explores what would have happened if the Civil Rights movement had been met with outright Civil War won by the south, In the Pines explores the history of white supremacy in Jefferson Davis County, Mississippi including a lynching carried out and covered up by the author’s own grandfather. It describes how white southerners systematically destroyed and dismantled what they were unwilling to integrate—from swimming pools, to schools, to democracy itself. The reality is we are not far from the dystopia described in The Blueprint, even without the 2nd civil war. Although I appreciated the author’s personal perspective, and growing up in the south I have personal experience with racism in the family, the author’s relationship with the perpetrator makes for a very uncomfortable telling. She does not shy away from exposing (to the extent possible) what must have occurred, but neither does she shy away from her childhood memories of a grandfather she loved and who loved her. It’s hard to reconcile. It also points to the reality that many of us know people who have lynched, but just haven’t sought to know it. ( )
  SusanBraxton | Mar 10, 2024 |
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An award-winning scholar of white supremacy tackles her toughest research assignment yet: the unsolved murder of a black man in rural Mississippi while her grandfather was the local sheriff--a cold case that sheds new light on the hidden legacy of racial terror in America.

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