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The Memorandum by Vaclav Havel
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The Memorandum (edition 1990)

by Vaclav Havel

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885227,753 (3.59)4
The Memo is one of V clav Havel's most popular plays, and this new translation is by Havel's most prolific translator, Paul Wilson. An office has adopted a new official language, Ptydepe, in an attempt to make communication more scientific. But the new language may truly be a tool for power. Havel's play was able to slip by the Communist Czech censors in 1965, despite its veiled political commentary. Part of the Havel Collection, a series of new translations of the work of V clav Havel, from Theater 61 Press.… (more)
Member:mschlot1
Title:The Memorandum
Authors:Vaclav Havel
Info:Grove Pr (1990), Paperback
Collections:Your library
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The Memorandum by Václav Havel

  1. 00
    The Trial by Franz Kafka (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: absurdist take on the workings of bureaucracy
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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
1 of 2 copies available in the BSCED Library
  BSCEDLibrary | Sep 30, 2014 |
So focused on making a point about the society that it doesn't hang together as a play. ( )
  thatotter | Feb 6, 2014 |
In his introduction, Tom Stoppard says that in the play's Newspeak Ptydepe, a more frequently used word has fewer letter than a less frequently used one, and that the word for "wombat" therefore has 319 letters. You know what that means? That Prague's problems could be solved if it had more wombats. And really, the same could be said for anywhere.
  ljhliesl | May 21, 2013 |
Pretty entertaining-- and still representative of office/government/work-related absurdity. ( )
  KatrinkaV | Jul 19, 2011 |
A very Kafka like story (actually a Play) of Russian bureaucracy, or any governments bureacracy for that matter, at its worse and cleverly depicted. ( )
  nhoule | Aug 14, 2007 |
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The Memo is one of V clav Havel's most popular plays, and this new translation is by Havel's most prolific translator, Paul Wilson. An office has adopted a new official language, Ptydepe, in an attempt to make communication more scientific. But the new language may truly be a tool for power. Havel's play was able to slip by the Communist Czech censors in 1965, despite its veiled political commentary. Part of the Havel Collection, a series of new translations of the work of V clav Havel, from Theater 61 Press.

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