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The Last Murder at the End of the World: A…
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The Last Murder at the End of the World: A Novel (edition 2024)

by Stuart Turton (Author)

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13011211,220 (3.86)1
"From the bestselling author of The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle and The Devil and the Dark Water comes an inventive, high-concept murder mystery: an ingenious puzzle, an extraordinary backdrop, and an audacious solution. Solve the murder to save what's left of the world. Outside the island there is nothing: the world was destroyed by a fog that swept the planet, killing anyone it touched. On the island: it is idyllic. One hundred and twenty-two villagers and three scientists, living in peaceful harmony. The villagers are content to fish, farm and feast, to obey their nightly curfew, to do what they're told by the scientists. Until, to the horror of the islanders, one of their beloved scientists is found brutally stabbed to death. And then they learnthat the murder has triggered a lowering of the security system around the island, the only thing that was keeping the fog at bay. If the murder isn't solved within 92 hours, the fog will smother the island-and everyone on it. But the security system hasalso wiped everyone's memories of exactly what happened the night before, which means that someone on the island is a murderer-and they don't even know it. And the clock is ticking"--… (more)
Member:kdowli01
Title:The Last Murder at the End of the World: A Novel
Authors:Stuart Turton (Author)
Info:Sourcebooks Landmark (2024), 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
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The Last Murder at the End of the World by Stuart Turton

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When you get to the acknowledgements at the end of this book, you get a sense that this was not an easy story to write and things did not go well during the process and I have to say, that this book is not a patch on his previous books.

Set in the future where a black fog has swallowed up the whole of the world, trapping a few people on an island where it is held back by one person. Life on this island is happy, carefree and everything is in the service of the elders who oversee all, along with Abi a voice that is heard in everyone's head. Plenty of scope here for things to go wrong. And they do.

The book is an attempt, I think, at exploring what we mean by free will and so everyone on the island does not have the luxury of free will, it's just that they also don't know it. It only takes one person to start questioning and then the walls start to crumble. At the heart is the desire for money and how it distorts actions. Step out of line and you are banished or killed (are we talking about Russia here?).

Part of the problem with the book is that I really didn't have a full grasp of what was going on in the first third and then nothing really happened until the last few pages. There were no thoughts as to why some of the characters were free to think but the majority weren't and it wasn't really clear why other people were entombed.

I enjoyed the short chapters - I like a book to roll along but not even the looming deadline for extinction really injected any pace or excitement into the plot. The story flat-lined. ( )
  allthegoodbooks | May 14, 2024 |
One of my most anticipated reads of the year! This is the latest whodunit by Stuart Turton, and I feel like people who liked his previous books will like this one, and those who didn't probably won't. It's a whodunit with speculative elements, and that's been what I've been enjoying most about Turton, the fact that he plays with the mystery genre. This time we're transported into an apocalyptic world far in the future where the last humans alive live on an island surrounded by deadly fog. The only thing keeping them alive is a defense system. Then one of the scientists in control of this system is killed, and the remaining people need to solve this murder or else the defenses will go down in just a few days..

I enjoy Turton's writing, the characters, the pacing, and the twisty narrative. I was kept on the edge of my seat and was constantly wanting to know how things would play out.
  alliepascal | Apr 24, 2024 |
*Thank you to Netgalley, the publishers, and the author for a free e-copy in exchange for an honest review.*

I really wanted to read this book for three big reasons:

* I’d read The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by this author and loved it.
* The GORGEOUS cover.
* The blurb reminded me of a return to traditional dystopia.

The Last Murder at the End of the World takes place in a world where most of the planet has been destroyed by a poisonous fog. The last safe haven is a little island where one hundred twenty-two villagers and three scientists live in harmony. The villagers are content to fish, farm, and do as they’re told — including treating the scientists, or “elders,” with the utmost reverence. And then one of the scientists turns up dead, and the shield protecting their island from the fog goes down. It’s up to Emory — one of the more curious villagers, to figure out what happened. There’s one big problem: everyone’s memories have been erased.

I do think there’s a bit of a learning curve with the world-building and the sheer amount of characters. I myself had to reread the beginning chapters a few times just to remember the names.

Once the plot really gets into the thick of it, however, it became very interesting. This is probably what I would call a “slow burn mystery.” The pieces are carefully laid out and slowly revealed as Emory herself discovers more clues and uncovers the truth about the world.

I think the book was at its strongest when we were following Emory, who was made the most interesting by her imperfection and lack of knowledge. I actually wish we followed her more instead of the other characters, like Abi, the island’s resident artificial intelligence. While it’s a really interesting idea and I understand how Emory’s perspective might’ve read too much like a typical, cliché dystopia, I felt like everyone else’s narration was just a little too robotic and monotonous, whereas Emory’s was refreshingly full of life and chaos.

Overall, I feel like this was objectively well-written and thought out, but I never felt completely emotionally invested in any characters other than Emory. I’d still highly recommend this to readers of science fiction and speculative fiction, since there’s a lot we can discuss about human nature as we read this book. And I’d love to see this world adapted to film.

The Last Murder at the End of the World comes out March 28, 2024. ( )
  CatherineHsu | Mar 27, 2024 |
Another one of those books where the title pulls me in. But I do love a post-apocalyptic story that has some mystery to it. I didn’t expect the sci-fi part of it but that’s okay. So, a fog spreads throughout the world and insects inside the fog devour anything and anyone. On a Greek island, where there was once a research facility, they keep the fog at bay and have survived numerous decades. Then one of the elders is murdered which leads a chain of events that turns off the mechanism that stops the fog from approaching the island. The inhabitants have a few days to find the murder which would turn it back on and save the island.

That said, it was an okay story. I was a little consumed at first. Too many characters to keep track off and so much going on, sometimes it was hard to follow. But that’s just me, I am not much of a science fiction fan but overall it was okay. ( )
  grumpydan | Mar 20, 2024 |
"The Last Murder at the End of the World" is a fascinating post-apocalyptic murder mystery. It's also though-provoking, incredibly well-plotted, and entirely unique.

The murder in question occurs in an unusual version of the "locked room" scenario...the last survivors of a deadly-fog-apocalypse are living on an isolated island, so the suspect pool is obviously limited. To make things more challenging for the investigator (Emory), everyone's memories of the night of the crime have been wiped, including her own. Just in case the stakes weren't high enough...if Emory can't solve the murder and make sure the killer is executed in just under two days, the fog will cover the island, killing everyone, and thereby ending human life on earth.

Within those parameters, Emory begins her investigation. Unlike most of the island's inhabitants, she's curious and willing to ask hard questions. However, given that LITERALLY nobody is able to remember anything, she has her work cut out for her. As she progresses through whatever leads she can find, she raises as may new questions as she answers, all in a high-stakes race against the clock.

Author Stuart Turton skillfully weaves character backstories and glimpses of the onset of the apocalypse with Emory's investigation so that the reader fills in their own blanks about the past at the same time as Emory's blanks in her memory and what actually happened. There's a lot to uncover and figure out, and not everyone (or everything) is as it appears. To avoid spoilers, I won't say more, but PLEASE read this one for some surprising revelations!

You'll leave this story with a complete understanding of what actually happened on the night in question. However, you'll also leave with a lot of things to think about. I wish I could share a few of them here but.....the questions themselves would be spoiler-ish. (If you're planning to read this one, which I highly recommend, try to go in without reading any more about it. You'll enjoy it much more if you have less of an idea what to expect.)

5 slices of perfect Provolone! (Also a nominee for my Top 10 books of 2024!) ( )
  Simmmba | Mar 12, 2024 |
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"From the bestselling author of The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle and The Devil and the Dark Water comes an inventive, high-concept murder mystery: an ingenious puzzle, an extraordinary backdrop, and an audacious solution. Solve the murder to save what's left of the world. Outside the island there is nothing: the world was destroyed by a fog that swept the planet, killing anyone it touched. On the island: it is idyllic. One hundred and twenty-two villagers and three scientists, living in peaceful harmony. The villagers are content to fish, farm and feast, to obey their nightly curfew, to do what they're told by the scientists. Until, to the horror of the islanders, one of their beloved scientists is found brutally stabbed to death. And then they learnthat the murder has triggered a lowering of the security system around the island, the only thing that was keeping the fog at bay. If the murder isn't solved within 92 hours, the fog will smother the island-and everyone on it. But the security system hasalso wiped everyone's memories of exactly what happened the night before, which means that someone on the island is a murderer-and they don't even know it. And the clock is ticking"--

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