HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Cades Cove: The Life and Death of a Southern Appalachian Community,… (1988)

by Durwood Dunn

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
981220,854 (4)1
Cades CoveThe Life and Death of a Southern Appalachian Community, 1818-1937Durwood DunnWinner of the Thomas Wolfe Literary Award Drawing on a rich trove of documents never before available to scholars, the author sketches the early pioneers, their daily lives, their beliefs, and their struggles to survive and prosper in this isolated mountain community, now within the confines of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In moving detail this book brings to life an isolated mountain community, its struggle to survive, and the tragedy of its demise. Professor Dunn provides us with a model historical investigation of a southern mountain community.a His findings on commercial farming, family, religion, and politics will challenge many standard interpretations of the Appalachian past.--Gordon B. McKinney, Western Carolina University. a aThis is a fine book. . . . It is mostly about community and interrelationships, and thus it refutes much of the literature that presents Southern Mountaineers as individualistic, irreligious, violent, and unlawful.OCoLoyal Jones, Appalachian Heritage. a Dunn . . . has written one of the best books ever produced about the Southern mountains.OCoVirginia Quarterly Review. a This study offers the first detailed analysis of a remote southern Appalachian community in the nineteenth century.a It should lay to rest older images of the region as isolated and static, but it raises new questions about the nature of that premodern community.OCoRonald D Eller, American Historical Review Not only is his book a worthy addition to the growing body of work recognizing the complexities of southern mountain society; it is also a lively testament to the value of local history and the variety of levels at which it can provide significant enlightenment.OCoJohn C. Inscoe, LOCUS "… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Cades Cove, Tennessee, 1818-1937. This is one of the best-researched books I've found about the time and the area. It's in part a correction of earlier stereotypes of the Appalachian mountaineer. Dunn was the grandson of the last man to leave the cove, so his interest in the subject is personal. He is professor of history and political science at Tennessee Wesleyan College, so he writes as a historian.

Dunn weaves the story of generations of the Oliver family throughout the book. John Oliver was a leader in the community, a progressive farmer who helped his neighbors get the most out of their land. He also waged a heroic battle in the courts in his effort to resist the government breaking up his community by declaring eminent domain. He and his neighbors lost that battle, and he was forced off his land where his family had farmed for four generations.

I give the book only a four because of its organization. The chapters seem to have been written independently of one another, so there is some overlap and repetition. ( )
1 vote labwriter | Jan 5, 2010 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Cades CoveThe Life and Death of a Southern Appalachian Community, 1818-1937Durwood DunnWinner of the Thomas Wolfe Literary Award Drawing on a rich trove of documents never before available to scholars, the author sketches the early pioneers, their daily lives, their beliefs, and their struggles to survive and prosper in this isolated mountain community, now within the confines of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In moving detail this book brings to life an isolated mountain community, its struggle to survive, and the tragedy of its demise. Professor Dunn provides us with a model historical investigation of a southern mountain community.a His findings on commercial farming, family, religion, and politics will challenge many standard interpretations of the Appalachian past.--Gordon B. McKinney, Western Carolina University. a aThis is a fine book. . . . It is mostly about community and interrelationships, and thus it refutes much of the literature that presents Southern Mountaineers as individualistic, irreligious, violent, and unlawful.OCoLoyal Jones, Appalachian Heritage. a Dunn . . . has written one of the best books ever produced about the Southern mountains.OCoVirginia Quarterly Review. a This study offers the first detailed analysis of a remote southern Appalachian community in the nineteenth century.a It should lay to rest older images of the region as isolated and static, but it raises new questions about the nature of that premodern community.OCoRonald D Eller, American Historical Review Not only is his book a worthy addition to the growing body of work recognizing the complexities of southern mountain society; it is also a lively testament to the value of local history and the variety of levels at which it can provide significant enlightenment.OCoJohn C. Inscoe, LOCUS "

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 162,572,089 books! | Top bar: Always visible