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Art of Living: The Classical Manual on…
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Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and… (original 2013; edition 2007)

by Epictetus (Author), Sharon Lebell (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,522384,521 (4.02)24
From the Introduction: "Stoic philosophy, of which Epictetus (c. a.d. 50--130) is a representative, began as a recognizable movement around 300 b.c. Its founder was Zeno of Cytium (not to be confused with Zeno of Elea, who discovered the famous paradoxes). He was born in Cyprus about 336 b.c., but all of his philosophical activity took place in Athens. For more than 500 years Stoicism was one of the most influential and fruitful philosophical movements in the Graeco-Roman world. The works of the earlier Stoics survive only in fragmentary quotations from other authors, but from the Renaissance until well into the nineteenth century, Stoic ethical thought was one of the most important ancient influences on European ethics, particularly because of the descriptions of it by Cicero, through surviving works by the Stoics Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and also Epictetus--and also because of the effect that it had had in antiquity, and continued to have into the nineteenth century, on Christian ethical views. Nowadays an undergraduate or graduate student learning about ancient philosophy in a university course may well hear only about Plato and Aristotle, along perhaps with the presocratics; but in the history of Western thought and education this situation is somewhat atypical, and in most periods a comparable student would have learned as much or more about Stoicism, as well as two other major ancient philosophical movements, Epicureanism and Scepticism. In spite of this lack of explicit acquaintance with Stoic philosophers and their works, however, most students will recognize in Epictetus various ideas that are familiar through their effects on other thinkers, notably Spinoza, in our intellectual tradition."… (more)
Member:tgraettinger
Title:Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness
Authors:Epictetus (Author)
Other authors:Sharon Lebell (Author)
Info:HarperOne (2007), Edition: 5/27/07, 144 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work Information

Enchiridion by Epictetus (Author) (2013)

  1. 00
    The Discourses of Epictetus by Epictetus (stephencz)
  2. 00
    Meditations by Marcus Aurelius (Michael.Rimmer)
  3. 00
    A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B Irvine (prosfilaes)
    prosfilaes: It's mostly the same philosophy, except Irvine had read Voltaire's Candide. But it's expanded, with a lot more discussion about how it applies practically and to modern life.
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» See also 24 mentions

English (32)  Spanish (3)  Italian (1)  French (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
Classic - just finished reading it for the second, and I have picked up new insights each time ( )
  tgraettinger | Nov 25, 2021 |
This is the little (29 pp) book that lays out the essence of Stoic philosophy. While founded by Zeno of Cytium more than three centuries earlier, it is the work of Epictetus (along with Seneca and Marcus Aurelius) that forms Stoic thought as we know it today. Stoicism, while not a well known today as the thought of Plato and Aristotle, was one of the major philosophic schools in Greece and Rome for a half a millenium. What makes the handbook most interesting today is the practical advice aspect of Epictetus' thought. One can put some of these ideas to good use even in the twenty-first century. ( )
  jwhenderson | Nov 1, 2021 |
4.5

I think Epictetus missed some points in some of the chapters, so I do not agree with all that's written, but all in all, a great book with a collection of practical advice to live by. ( )
  mdibaiee | Sep 23, 2021 |
Re-read ( )
  jamestomasino | Sep 11, 2021 |
I didn't read this version, but the one found on Project Gutenburg translated by Thomas Higginson. ( )
  KittyCatrinCat | Aug 29, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 32 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (178 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
EpictetusAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
ArrianEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Capelle, WilhelmTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carter, ElizabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cattin, EmmanuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chakrapani, ChuckTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crawford, TomEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guyau, Jean-MarieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Higginson, Thomas WentworthTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jaffro, LaurentIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lebell, SharonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Leopardi, GiacomoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Long, GeorgeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Negri, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neitzke, ErnstTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oud-leerling van J.H. LeopoldTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ricci, MatteoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, N. P.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, Nicholas P.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, Nicholas P.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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From the Introduction: "Stoic philosophy, of which Epictetus (c. a.d. 50--130) is a representative, began as a recognizable movement around 300 b.c. Its founder was Zeno of Cytium (not to be confused with Zeno of Elea, who discovered the famous paradoxes). He was born in Cyprus about 336 b.c., but all of his philosophical activity took place in Athens. For more than 500 years Stoicism was one of the most influential and fruitful philosophical movements in the Graeco-Roman world. The works of the earlier Stoics survive only in fragmentary quotations from other authors, but from the Renaissance until well into the nineteenth century, Stoic ethical thought was one of the most important ancient influences on European ethics, particularly because of the descriptions of it by Cicero, through surviving works by the Stoics Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and also Epictetus--and also because of the effect that it had had in antiquity, and continued to have into the nineteenth century, on Christian ethical views. Nowadays an undergraduate or graduate student learning about ancient philosophy in a university course may well hear only about Plato and Aristotle, along perhaps with the presocratics; but in the history of Western thought and education this situation is somewhat atypical, and in most periods a comparable student would have learned as much or more about Stoicism, as well as two other major ancient philosophical movements, Epicureanism and Scepticism. In spite of this lack of explicit acquaintance with Stoic philosophers and their works, however, most students will recognize in Epictetus various ideas that are familiar through their effects on other thinkers, notably Spinoza, in our intellectual tradition."

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