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The Star by David Skibbins
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Showing 4 of 4
Third of Tarot Card Mysteries
  scarycreek | Mar 3, 2019 |
Excellent third outing for Warren Ritter, the tarot-card reading, bipolar former 60s radical. In this book he must help his recently-discovered daughter who is accused of killing her husband. ( )
  auntieknickers | Jan 3, 2008 |
For most of his daughter Francine’s life, Warren Ritter didn’t know he HAD a daughter. Now he has a daughter accused of murdering her cop-husband Orrin. Plus our hero finds himself saddled ever so briefly with his infant grandson, Justin. Warren is fond of the little guy, but he’s definitely not prepared to deal with all the poop. (That leads to one of the funniest, laugh-out-loud scenes I’ve ever encountered in a mystery.)

But Warren’s focus in The Star isn’t on dirty diapers. It’s on discovering whether Fran killed her husband -- with Fran’s having inherited her father’s flawed brain chemistry, that’s always a possibility. If she didn’t murder the loathsome toad. Warren is intent on finding out who did. At the same time, he’s is trying to figure out whether his father, whom he hadn’t seen for years, truly died of a heart attack or whether he was helped along by another relative Warren didn’t know he had – an evil stepmother.

The Tarot Card Mysteries by David Skibbins are grand fun. Warren is in a tough personal situation (see review of Eight of Swords below) but the author exhibits exceptional skill at balancing the dark with the light. Many of the characters are eccentric, some of them in the extreme, but they’re all grounded in a reality readers will identify with. Although The Star is definitely NOT your grandmother’s cozy mystery – it’s wonderfully entertaining and highly recommended.

By Diana. First published in the Cozy Library May 21, 2007. ( )
  NewsieQ | May 25, 2007 |
Showing 4 of 4
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I dedicated my first two books to organizations and women that many people know. The Star is dedicated to a woman very few people know. You can't even find Dorothea Romankiw by searching in Google. And yet, for dozens of us, she altered our lives completely. She died in her eighties in July of 2006.
In 1964 she began a treatment center for schizophrenic adolescents based on the work of Carl Jung called St. George Homes. It was located in Victorian homes scattered around north Berkeley. She was brilliant, impossible, unpredictable, compassionate, and rarely satisfied. But she woke up the staff, and some of the kids, to a magical, mystical world of myth and beauty that permeates what we call ordinary reality. Jungians study the collective unconscious. At St. George's we lived it. In tepees on the desert floor, in sweat lodges under redwoods, in candlelight beside a frozen lake, or dressed in robes and ornate masks in the hills of Berkeley, one hundred and fifty staff and forty-five schizophrenic teenagers encountered the healing power of the collective unconscious. One young patient said it best: "In other institutions people watched me go down into the crazy places. You went down there with me, by my side. Then we came out together."
It is because of her that Warren knows these dark corners of the psyche. He, and I, bow low in honor of your memory, Dorothea.
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Mr. Ritter, I mean Warren, ah...Dad, I need your help.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312361939, Hardcover)

After two recent encounters with crime, Warren Ritter is determined to live the quiet life, but fate isn't paying any attention. His daughter, Fran, with whom he has only recently become acquainted, is in serious need of his help. She has separated from her husband, Orrin, who has taken their five-month-old son and refuses to give him back. If she challenges him, he will lie about her suitability as a mother. He's a police officer and she is afraid he can get away with it. Things become even more complicated when Orrin is found dead and Fran becomes the prime suspect. Now it's going to take Warren's full store of resources to clear his daughter's name.
David Skibbins's two previous novels have received high praise, both for his unusual and likable sleuth, the "hippie of a certain age" Warren, and the vivid Berkeley setting. With this third installment, Skibbins gives readers another thrilling adventure embellished with the mysteries of the tarot.
 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:33 -0400)

After two recent encounters with crime, Warren Ritter is determined to live the quiet life, but fate isn't paying any attention. His daughter, Fran, with whom he has only recently become acquainted, is in serious need of his help. She has separated from her husband, Orrin, who has taken their five-month-old son and refuses to give him back. If she challenges him, he will lie about her suitability as a mother. He's a police officer and she is afraid he can get away with it. Things become even more complicated when Orrin is found dead and Fran becomes the prime suspect. Now it's going to take Warren's full store of resources to clear his daughter's name.David Skibbins's two previous novels have received high praise, both for his unusual and likable sleuth, the "hippie of a certain age" Warren, and the vivid Berkeley setting. With this third installment, Skibbins gives readers another thrilling adventure embellished with the mysteries of the tarot.… (more)

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