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How Voters Decide: Information Processing in…
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How Voters Decide: Information Processing in Election Campaigns (Cambridge… (edition 2006)

by Richard R. Lau, David P. Redlawsk

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This book attempts to redirect the field of voting behavior research by proposing a paradigm-shifting framework for studying voter decision making. An innovative experimental methodology is presented for getting 'inside the heads' of citizens as they confront the overwhelming rush of information from modern presidential election campaigns. Four broad theoretically-defined types of decision strategies that voters employ to help decide which candidate to support are described and operationally-defined. Individual and campaign-related factors that lead voters to adopt one or another of these strategies are examined. Most importantly, this research proposes a new normative focus for the scientific study of voting behavior: we should care about not just which candidate received the most votes, but also how many citizens voted correctly - that is, in accordance with their own fully-informed preferences.… (more)
Member:mbargsted
Title:How Voters Decide: Information Processing in Election Campaigns (Cambridge Studies in Public Opinion and Political Psychology)
Authors:Richard R. Lau
Other authors:David P. Redlawsk
Info:Cambridge University Press (2006), Paperback, 366 pages
Collections:Your library
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How Voters Decide: Information Processing in Election Campaigns by Richard R. Lau

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard R. Lauprimary authorall editionscalculated
Redlawsk, David P.main authorall editionsconfirmed
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This book attempts to redirect the field of voting behavior research by proposing a paradigm-shifting framework for studying voter decision making. An innovative experimental methodology is presented for getting 'inside the heads' of citizens as they confront the overwhelming rush of information from modern presidential election campaigns. Four broad theoretically-defined types of decision strategies that voters employ to help decide which candidate to support are described and operationally-defined. Individual and campaign-related factors that lead voters to adopt one or another of these strategies are examined. Most importantly, this research proposes a new normative focus for the scientific study of voting behavior: we should care about not just which candidate received the most votes, but also how many citizens voted correctly - that is, in accordance with their own fully-informed preferences.

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