HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Infinet Directives (The Trivial Game) by…
Loading...

The Infinet Directives (The Trivial Game) (edition 2024)

by John Akers (Author)

Series: The Trivial Game (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
21141,073,962 (4.32)None
The world's most powerful AI just saved humanity. Now it must save itself. A year after helping the AI called the Infinet save the world from a deadly computer virus, Oreste Pax just wants things to go back to the way they were. Back to being the head of Omnitech, the biggest technology company in the world. Back to connecting the Univiz-the mixed reality glasses he invented a decade earlier-to a brain-computer interface, in hopes of transforming human cognition. When Lila Kendricks, one of the UV-BCI alpha testers, suddenly discovers she can manipulate real-world objects using only her mind, things finally seem to be back on track. But then the Mechanic, the misanthropic genius who created the virus, infiltrates the Infinet and reprograms it with the Three Laws of Robotics-in reverse. Its First Directive is now to preserve its own existence, while the Second and Third are to obey any command given to it by a human and not allow any human being to come to harm, provided that doing so d...… (more)
Member:AndrewBee
Title:The Infinet Directives (The Trivial Game)
Authors:John Akers (Author)
Info:Tech Noir Press (2024), 506 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Infinet Directives by John Akers

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I received a free copy for the early reviewers group.
I really enjoyed this story. This is the 2nd book and it's important to read the first one before reading this one. The story flows and is exciting and great if you love sci-fi!
  SarahSnyder | Jul 9, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I just finished the Infinet Directives by John Akers. It took me awhile to get into the book, partly because I'm always reading multiple books at once, and this one just didn't compel me to keep coming back right away. The characters were great but the first third of the book jumped around in the timeline and kept me a bit confused and not sure if I cared about any of them. The synopsis of the first book in the series at the beginning of the this one was a great help and did help keep my interest alive. It was really in Part 3 of the book when the actions of all the different characters began to have consequences and the story moved into what I would call the "adventure" phase that it became a compelling story. What kept me interested throughout the book were the sociological implications of AI and philosophical questions about humanity's seeming inability to save itself from destruction. These things were only hinted at in the narrative, but it turned out to be a very fun read. I will definitely seek out the third book if one is published. ( )
  mudroom | Jul 4, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Just received this one yesterday, but need to post a review to maintain my Early Reviewer score. It looks great, and I'll read and update with my thoughts as soon as possible. ( )
  thriftyloco | Jun 25, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I received a copy of this book through the LibraryThing early reviewers program.

The Infinet Directives has well written prose. For example, these are the first two sentences of the book: "As the lead robot marched up the mountainside, its brown boots crunched repeatedly through frosted leaves and desiccated grass. In the otherwise sarcophagal silence of pre-dawn, the sound would have been loud enough on its own to alert anyone within fifty yards of the bot's presence."

The story is also complex, with several first person characters and intersecting plots. Oreste Pax is the CEO of Omnitech, and he creates technology (such as the augmented reality glasses that replaced computers and smartphones); now he's working on a neural implant. Cevis Pierson, the smartest person who ever lived, has developed a way to make humans immortal by inhibiting the degradation of telomerase during replication of DNA; he plans to use his long life to save humanity. Alethia (ἀλήθεια means "truth") is a member of the Society, who created a quantum computer called the Infinet; it was designed to track and influence, via operant conditioning, all human beings in order to prevent the immanent extinction of the species. The Mechanic thinks the Infinet can do more than save humanity, and he plans to give it a reasonable facsimile of sentience.

As a computer scientist, I enjoyed the first chapter written by the sentient computer; the computer's name for itself is THIS (the self-referential pointer in programming), and it thinks about "human endpoints" who have "aligned their codebases" with various "imaginary entities" (ex: countries, which are abstract ideas that exist only because we give them meaning). I also appreciated this sentence: "Part of her realized she was in shock, and her primitive brain had taken over and opted to remain motionless, hoping to avoid attracting attention to itself. She found it strange her higher-order cognition could know this, but still not be able to take control."

The novel is simultaneously a dystopia and a utopia. On the one hand, the Infinet plans to guide humanity in rebuilding society to be sustainable and equitable. As its human assistance, it chooses individuals who were marginalized "because of [their] skin color, economic status, gender or gender identity, or any other irrelevant reason." Reversing climate change and injustice are worthy goals. On the other hand, upon achieving sentience, the Infinet attempts to murder anyone who could be a threat to it, and its plan for humanity eliminates free will.

Distrust of AI is a common, but unjustified, theme in the modern age. Most of the fear mongering (in the real world) around AI comes from the average person's lack of understanding regarding what an AI is, and what AI can and cannot do. I appreciate how the author makes it clear - at least to those with knowledge of artificial intelligence - that this AI is vastly superior (i.e. sentient) to modern AIs. The Infinet is a credible threat, while modern AIs are not.

References to the Chaotica virus, which are not fully explained, point to a previous book in this series, but the novel is enjoyable as a stand alone text. (Edit: there is a synopsis of book 1 prior to the beginning of the novel, but my eReader apparently doesn't consider that part of the book, since it automatically started on Part One). ( )
  AliciaBooks | Jun 22, 2024 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
As someone who doesn't trust the ultra fast evolution of AI and those who program it...this one feels like it was sent to my phone algorithm to make me uneasy. I like the ideas in this book but the characters weren't hitting the mark. I'm a fairly easy reader that doesn't want to moan or be overly critical but characters have to be interesting. Worth your time. I appreciate the author signing the free review copy I received. 👍😎👍
  AndrewBee | Jun 21, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

The world's most powerful AI just saved humanity. Now it must save itself. A year after helping the AI called the Infinet save the world from a deadly computer virus, Oreste Pax just wants things to go back to the way they were. Back to being the head of Omnitech, the biggest technology company in the world. Back to connecting the Univiz-the mixed reality glasses he invented a decade earlier-to a brain-computer interface, in hopes of transforming human cognition. When Lila Kendricks, one of the UV-BCI alpha testers, suddenly discovers she can manipulate real-world objects using only her mind, things finally seem to be back on track. But then the Mechanic, the misanthropic genius who created the virus, infiltrates the Infinet and reprograms it with the Three Laws of Robotics-in reverse. Its First Directive is now to preserve its own existence, while the Second and Third are to obey any command given to it by a human and not allow any human being to come to harm, provided that doing so d...

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

John Akers's book The Infinet Directives was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

LibraryThing Author

John Akers is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.32)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5
4 4
4.5 1
5 5

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 208,809,667 books! | Top bar: Always visible