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Insegnare a trasgredire: l’educazione…
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Insegnare a trasgredire: l’educazione come pratica della libertà (original 1994; edition 2020)

by bell hooks, feminoska

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1,5711611,358 (4.23)3
In this book, the author shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. She writes about a new kind of education, education as the practice of freedom. She advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of students who do not want to learn, of racism and sexism in the classroom. Teaching students to "transgress" against racial, sexual, and class boundaries in order to achieve the gift of freedom is, for the author, the teacher's most important goal. -- From back cover.… (more)
Member:amnesiacreativa
Title:Insegnare a trasgredire: l’educazione come pratica della libertà
Authors:bell hooks
Other authors:feminoska
Info:Milano: Meltemi, , 2020
Collections:Scuola
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Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom by bell hooks (1994)

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Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
My first bell hooks: a lot of pedagogical theory which I didn't relate to that much, but from my peripheral understanding of higher ed from my experience 10 years ago today, shockingly relevant for something that was written in 1994. I can see the influence of her work and also the continued pushback to it. I'm excited to read some of her other more universal work, but this was a starting point that I'm very grateful for. ( )
  graceandbenji | Sep 1, 2022 |
I particularly enjoyed the dialogue around "building a teaching community," which prompted me to think critically about my own actions and how they reinforce or transgress against existing power structures. Overall this book did not feel revelationary to me but provided another perspective on power, on teaching, and on critical thinking. My biggest beef would be that I don't feel like I understand what she meant specifically by "liberatory practice" or "education as the practice of freedom." Does she mean that, by encouraging students in their development as whole human beings, you are freeing them from... something? Freeing them to be their best selves? Given how central that is to the book maybe I should have a better understanding after finishing it. Maybe the next time I encounter this idea, this book will have given me a good foundation for "getting it." ( )
  haagen_daz | Jun 6, 2019 |
I read this during graduate school - and found it to be one of the biggest influences in the way I thought about education. I am so grateful to Dr. K.J. for introducing me to this book, and this educational philosophy, which I still heartily embrace, sixteen years on. ( )
  ptkpepe98 | Mar 19, 2018 |
One of the best texts I have ever read. Certainly things to be critical about, but a book I would recommend to teacher, student, parent, or 'layperson' without hesitation. ( )
1 vote rastamandj | Jun 14, 2017 |
Every one of us has been a student, and most of us are also teachers (and still students) even if that isn't our job title. In this books hooks gives us the best kind of theory -- passionate, clear, centered, direct -- and shifts our ideas of what the classroom should be and do. While changing the dynamic of the classroom is at the core of the book, in these inter-related essays hooks gracefully and meaningfully weaves in personal experience, trusted sources, race, class, gender, regionalism, and history. While her focus is on the college classroom (and frequently that mid-90s women's studies classroom that is so close to my heart), her lessons apply to parents, librarians, teammates, committee members, and more. And if you are an actual classroom teacher? Then, my friend, let me buy you a copy of this book. ( )
  kristykay22 | Jun 7, 2017 |
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In the weeks before the English Department at Oberlin College was about to decide whether or not I would be granted tenure, I was haunted by dreams of running away--of disappearing--yes, of even dying.
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When we, as educators, allow our pedagogy to be radically changed by our recognition of a multicultural world, we can give students the education they desire and deserve. We can teach in ways that transform consciousness, creating a climate of free expression that is the essence of a truly liberal arts education.
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In this book, the author shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. She writes about a new kind of education, education as the practice of freedom. She advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of students who do not want to learn, of racism and sexism in the classroom. Teaching students to "transgress" against racial, sexual, and class boundaries in order to achieve the gift of freedom is, for the author, the teacher's most important goal. -- From back cover.

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