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The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, Part 2) (1954)

by J. R. R. Tolkien

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Middle-earth (3.2), The Lord of the Rings (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
44,83129128 (4.4)1 / 524
Frodo and his companions of the ring have been beset by danger during their quest to prevent the ruling ring from falling into the hands of the Dark Lord by destroying it in the Cracks of Doom. They lost the wizard Gandalf in a battle in the Mines of Moria, and Boromir, seduced by the power of the ring, tried to seize it by force. While Frodo and Sam made their escape, the rest of the company was attacked by Orcs. Now they continue the journey alone down th great River Anduin ... alone, that is, save for the mysterious creeping figure that follows wherever they go.… (more)
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 2019 Category Challenge: Lord of the Rings Group Read34 unread / 34ironjaw, April 2021

» See also 524 mentions

English (265)  Spanish (9)  French (4)  Swedish (2)  Lithuanian (1)  Polish (1)  Finnish (1)  Slovak (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hungarian (1)  Greek (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (288)
Showing 1-5 of 265 (next | show all)
I love revisiting a classic. Listening to Andy Serkis narrate is an absolute joy, I fully recommend. ( )
  battlearmanda | May 8, 2023 |
I think this version of The Two Towers is the first time that I have enjoyed the Frodo and Sam part as much as the first half of the book. Usually, when reading it for myself, I skim the Frodo-Sam-Gollum section up until when they meet Faramir, and then I read that section, and then I skim again until the very end. This time, though, I enjoyed the whole book! Listening to Andy Serkis narrate made all the difference in the world. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Apr 21, 2023 |
Every time I reread this book I get so mad about the movie. I KNOW, it's been fifteen years, I should get over it, but the movie is so bad compared to the book. They skipped all the good parts just so they could focus on a stupid war. >:(

Things I enjoy more and more on every reread is Gollum though. He's adorable, in the most annoying and creepy way. I mean, his big dream is to eat fish every day!!! I know I mention this every time I review the book, but I always forget it and then I love it so much.

Anyway, I love it. I love this entire trilogy. Shocking!!! ( )
1 vote upontheforemostship | Feb 22, 2023 |
I always think that book four (the second part of this book, that's only about Frodo and Sam) is the weakest part of the trilogy, and while that may be true it is never as bad as I think it is. First, it's really short, just a little over 100 pages, and secondly: it has some really good parts. Faramir, for example, is a amazing when he shows up, plus anything concerning Gollum and fish is cute and funny.

And then they enter Shelob's lair, which is another good part because shit happens and then we get to hear orcs interact with each and I actually like that a lot. It's cool to see that they are longing for a time after the war ends when things calm down. I can so buy that there are orc farmers somewhere off in a deep part of Mordor.

And now, of course, we get to the best book of all three!! Return of the Kings. Returns are always the best, be it jedis or kings. ( )
1 vote upontheforemostship | Feb 22, 2023 |
Ah, The Two Towers. I think the movie really did it a disservice (it is by far the worst movie) because every time I start it I think I won't love it as much as FotR, but that's just not true. It is a very good book in its own right, especially since so little of it is actually the Battle of Helm's Deep.

I also think, whenever I reach the second part, dealing with Frodo and Sam, that I've reached the worst part of the trilogy, and that might be true, but it's not BAD. I mean, for one, it introduces Faramir, and secondly, it has all these great parts about Gollum and fish. Everything from Sam whispering "fissh" into Gollum's ear to test if he's awake to Gollum dreaming about claiming the ring for his own so that he can have fish three times per day (is it ever more clear that he was a hobbit once? You can't really corrupt hobbits by telling them they will be powerful or mighty, but baiting them with their fave food? That might just do it ...) is hilarious and I always love reading it.

And now we've reached the best part of the trilogy, aka Return of the King. I even love all the fivehundred endings that so many people dislike, and there's even more of them in the book. ( )
  upontheforemostship | Feb 22, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 265 (next | show all)
That 'The Lord of the Rings' should appeal to readers of the most austere tastes suggests that they too now long for the old, forthright, virile kind of narrative... the author has had intimate access to an epic tradition stretching back and back and disappearing in the mists of Germanic history, so that his story has a kind of echoing depth behind it...
 

» Add other authors (92 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
J. R. R. Tolkienprimary authorall editionscalculated
Andersson, ErikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beagle, Peter S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blok, CorCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Domènech, LuisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaughan, JackCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hildebrandt, GregCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hildebrandt, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horne, MatildeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Howe, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Inglis, RobNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Juva, KerstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krege, WolfgangTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lauzon, DanielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ledoux, FrancisTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, AlanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marshall, RitaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ohlmarks, ÅkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Olsson, LottaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennanen, EilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Remington, BarbaraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rodrigues, Fernanda PintoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schuchart, MaxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Serkis, AndyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, DarrellCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, GeoffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Westra, Liuwe H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
Dedication
First words
Aragorn sped on up the hill.
Quotations
"Not asleep, dead".
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
J.R.R. Tolkien's complete work The Lord of the Rings consists of six Books, frequently bound in three Volumes:
  • Volume 1: The Fellowship of the Ring, consisting of Book I, "The Ring Sets Out" and Book II, "The Ring Goes South";
  • Volume 2: The Two Towers, consisting of Book III, "The Treason of Isengard," and Book IV, "The Ring Goes East"; and
  • Volume 3: The Return of the King, consisting of Book V, "The War of the Ring," and Book VI, "The End of the Third Age," with Appendices.
This LT Work consists of Volume 2, The Two Towers; please do not combine it with any other part(s) or with Tolkien's complete work, each of which have LT Works pages of their own.

CAUTION: It appears that most copies of the title O Senhor dos Anéis: As Duas Torres in Portuguese translation are the complete Volume 2 of "The Lord of the Rings," published in English as The Two Towers. However, a Brazilian edition of the same title reportedly includes only the first part (of two) of Volume 2, roughly corresponding to Book III of the larger Work, The Treason of Isengard; see O Senhor dos Anéis. Please be mindful of the difference, and only combine records for Works having the same content. Thank you.
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Frodo and his companions of the ring have been beset by danger during their quest to prevent the ruling ring from falling into the hands of the Dark Lord by destroying it in the Cracks of Doom. They lost the wizard Gandalf in a battle in the Mines of Moria, and Boromir, seduced by the power of the ring, tried to seize it by force. While Frodo and Sam made their escape, the rest of the company was attacked by Orcs. Now they continue the journey alone down th great River Anduin ... alone, that is, save for the mysterious creeping figure that follows wherever they go.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
The Fellowship was scattered. Some were bracing hopelessly for war against the ancient evil of Sauron. Some were contending with the treachery of the wizard Saruman. Only Frodo and Sam were left to take the accursed Ring of Power to be destroyed in Mordor–the dark Kingdom where Sauron was supreme. Their guide was Gollum, deceitful and lust-filled, slave to the corruption of the Ring.
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