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The Peoples of Middle-earth: Book 12 (The…
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The Peoples of Middle-earth: Book 12 (The History of Middle-earth) (edition 2002)

by Christopher Tolkien (Author)

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887118,922 (3.82)17
The concluding volume of The History of Middle-earth series, which examines the Appendices to The Lord of the Rings. The Peoples of Middle-earth traces the evolution of the Appendices to The Lord of The Rings, which provide a comprehensive historical structure of the Second and Third Ages, including Calendars, Hobbit genealogies and the Westron language. The book concludes with two unique abandoned stories: The New Shadow, set in Gondor during the Fourth Age, and the tale of Tal-elmar, in which the coming of the dreaded Numenorean ships is seen through the eyes of men of Middle-earth in the Dark Years. With the publication of this book, the long history of J.R.R. Tolkien's creation is completed and the enigmatic state of his work can be understood.… (more)
Member:Rahhl
Title:The Peoples of Middle-earth: Book 12 (The History of Middle-earth)
Authors:Christopher Tolkien (Author)
Info:HarperCollins (2002), 512 pages
Collections:Tolkien, Your library
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The Peoples of Middle-Earth (The History of Middle-Earth, Vol. 12) by J. R. R. Tolkien

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http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2115697.html

The first two-thirds are about the composition of the appendices of LotR; the rest brings together some short essays, mostly unfinished. Two of these are rather interesting. "The Shibboleth of Fëanor" looks at how the original 'þ' became 's' in Quenya but remained 'þ' in Sindarin, as in the name Sindacollo, the Quenya version of Thingol; Sindarin itself is a Quenya word, the Sindarin calling themselves the Egladhrim. There is also an intriguing late set of thoughts on the true identity of Glorfindel, who appears in quite different contexts in both LotR and the fall of Gondolin; one fascinating possibility is that he actually was killed in the First Age but allowed to return from the Halls of Mandos to accompany Gandalf on his mission, which would explain why the Nazgûl are particularly perturbed by him. There is also the fragment of The New Shadow, a sequel to LotR which clearly wasn't going anywhere; it is a story of boyhood orchard-robbing near Minas Tirith which didn't quite come together. ( )
  nwhyte | May 24, 2013 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tolkien, J. R. R.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tolkien, ChristopherEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Howe, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In my Foreword to Sauron Defeated I wrote that I would not attempt a study of the Appendices to The Lord of the Rings 'at this time'. That was an ambiguous remark, for I rather doubted that I would ever make the attempt; but I justified its postponement, at least, on the ground that 'my father soon turned again, when The Lord of the Rings was finished, to the myths
and legends of the Elder Days', and so devoted the following volumes to the later history of 'The Silmarillion'.
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The concluding volume of The History of Middle-earth series, which examines the Appendices to The Lord of the Rings. The Peoples of Middle-earth traces the evolution of the Appendices to The Lord of The Rings, which provide a comprehensive historical structure of the Second and Third Ages, including Calendars, Hobbit genealogies and the Westron language. The book concludes with two unique abandoned stories: The New Shadow, set in Gondor during the Fourth Age, and the tale of Tal-elmar, in which the coming of the dreaded Numenorean ships is seen through the eyes of men of Middle-earth in the Dark Years. With the publication of this book, the long history of J.R.R. Tolkien's creation is completed and the enigmatic state of his work can be understood.

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The last volume of posthumously edited papers. Part One: The Prologue and Appendices to The Lord of the Rings. Part Two: Late Writings (Of Dwarves and Men, The Shobboleth of Feanor, The Problem of Ros, Last Writings). Part Three: Teachings of Pengolodh. Part Four: Unfinished Tales.
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