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The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring…
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The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville… (original 1992; edition 1993)

by Wiley Sword (Author)

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1903120,975 (4.32)1
The rise of Civil War general John Bell Hood, his command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, and the decisions that led to its downfall. Though he barely escaped expulsion from West Point, John Bell Hood quickly rose through the ranks of the Confederate army. With bold leadership in the battles of Gaines' Mill and Antietam, Hood won favor with Confederate president Jefferson Davis. But his fortunes in war took a tragic turn when he assumed command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee.   After the fall of Atlanta, Hood marched his troops north in an attempt to draw Union army general William T. Sherman from his devastating "March to the Sea." But the ploy proved ruinous for the South. While Sherman was undeterred from his scorched-earth campaign, Hood and his troops charged headlong into catastrophe.   In this compelling account, Wiley Sword illustrates the poor command decisions and reckless pride that made a disaster of the Army of Tennessee's final campaign. From Spring Hill, where they squandered an early advantage, Hood and his troops launched an ill-fated attack on the neighboring town of Franklin. The disastrous battle came to be known as the "Gettysburg of the West." But worse was to come as Hood pressed on to Nashville, where his battered troops suffered the worst defeat of the entire war.   Winner of the Fletcher Pratt Award for best work of nonfiction about the Civil War, The Confederacy's Last Hurrah chronicles the destruction of the South's second largest army. "Narrated with brisk attention to the nuances of strategy--and with measured solemnity over the waste of life in war," it is a groundbreaking work of scholarship told with authority and compassion (Kirkus Reviews).  … (more)
Member:farrargirl1.
Title:The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville (Modern War Studies (Paperback))
Authors:Wiley Sword (Author)
Info:University Press of Kansas (1993), Edition: Reprint, 528 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:“John Bell Hood”, Battle of Franklin”, “American Civil War”

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The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville by Wiley Sword (1992)

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Before visiting the battlefield, the McGavock house,cemetery and other historical parts of Franklin, I wanted to know more details surrounding the actual battle itself. The Order of Battle, the physical placements of regiments, brigades and divisions, as well as a better understanding of the decisions made by General Hood while in Spring Hill, were subjects of personal interest to me. My great grandfather (17th Al.Infantry, Walthall’s Division) was shot in his left temple as they approached the hedges/ cotton gin area. He survived the head wound, graduated from Mobile Medical College, and was a country physician in rural south Alabama by age 23. He practiced medicine for 54 years and had nine children, my grandmother being one. She shared many fond memories of riding with him on house calls while he delivered babies, set bones, etc. in exchange for turnip greens if they could not pay. Not one time did he ever speak of the war or the day of 30 November, 1864.
Wiley Sword’s well-researched account of these historic few days in Tennessee was one of my two text books and guides as I walked the battlefield in the vicinity of my great grandfather’s regiment and brigade. The owner of a small independent book store in downtown Franklin recommended this book, along with the McDonough/Connelly “Five Tragic Hours”, which was an excellent companion to the Sword book. I would highly recommend both of these for anyone interested in a superbly detailed accounting of the senseless tragedy of the Battle of Franklin. ( )
  farrargirl1. | Feb 23, 2018 |
Excellent work! One of the best books on the final stages of the Confederate Army of the Tennessee. The author's reseach pulls many works from the Union side by using published works of those who faught in the battles. If you want to know about General Hood and his distroying his army at Franklin and Nashville this is to book for you. ( )
  dhughes | Mar 10, 2008 |
If you're a fan of John Bell Hood you would be wise to shy away from this book, as Wiley Sword does not have one positive thing to say about the Confederate general's winter war in the wake of the fall of Atlanta. Apart from analyzing the assorted battles in this campaign, where Sword really shines is in portraying the sheer misery of fighting in winter while short of everything; food, clothing, shelter, and hope. Even hardened military buffs will come away snarling at the waste of it all (Feb. 14, 2004). ( )
1 vote Shrike58 | May 8, 2006 |
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The rise of Civil War general John Bell Hood, his command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, and the decisions that led to its downfall. Though he barely escaped expulsion from West Point, John Bell Hood quickly rose through the ranks of the Confederate army. With bold leadership in the battles of Gaines' Mill and Antietam, Hood won favor with Confederate president Jefferson Davis. But his fortunes in war took a tragic turn when he assumed command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee.   After the fall of Atlanta, Hood marched his troops north in an attempt to draw Union army general William T. Sherman from his devastating "March to the Sea." But the ploy proved ruinous for the South. While Sherman was undeterred from his scorched-earth campaign, Hood and his troops charged headlong into catastrophe.   In this compelling account, Wiley Sword illustrates the poor command decisions and reckless pride that made a disaster of the Army of Tennessee's final campaign. From Spring Hill, where they squandered an early advantage, Hood and his troops launched an ill-fated attack on the neighboring town of Franklin. The disastrous battle came to be known as the "Gettysburg of the West." But worse was to come as Hood pressed on to Nashville, where his battered troops suffered the worst defeat of the entire war.   Winner of the Fletcher Pratt Award for best work of nonfiction about the Civil War, The Confederacy's Last Hurrah chronicles the destruction of the South's second largest army. "Narrated with brisk attention to the nuances of strategy--and with measured solemnity over the waste of life in war," it is a groundbreaking work of scholarship told with authority and compassion (Kirkus Reviews).  

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