HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

It Could Always Be Worse: A Yiddish Folk…
Loading...

It Could Always Be Worse: A Yiddish Folk Tale (1976)

by Margot Zemach

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6132523,130 (4.41)5
  1. 00
    Could anything be worse?: A Yiddish tale, by Marilyn Hirsh (raizel)
    raizel: My favorite of all the many versions of this story because the pictures show the family preparing for Shabbos---another way of looking at time---as the man and his family discover another way of looking at their space.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
I think the author of this book is successful in making the language of the book lively. She begins the book with a problem and adds to the problem little by little, making the problem even more ridiculous and hilarious as the story goes on. With the resolution of the problem also comes an important lesson brought to the reader. I illustrations were hilarious and I really enjoyed the book. ( )
  albethea | Dec 3, 2018 |
This is a story about a poor man and his family who seek the help of a rabbi to make their living conditions better. Throughout the story, the rabbi gives the poor man bad advice and instead makes the poor mans living situation worse. However in the end, the rabbi tells the poor man to undo everything that he has told the poor man to do. Without hesitation the poor man’s living conditions go back to how it was in the first place and is now more grateful than ever. This story is a good way to teach students about being grateful for what they have. ( )
  KarenGarcia | Nov 26, 2018 |
be grateful for what you have and things can get worse ( )
  Sherritaperry | Aug 14, 2018 |
Once upon a time a poor unfortunate man lived with his mother, his wife, and his six children in a one-room hut. Because they were so crowded, the children often fought and the man and his wife argued. When the poor man was unable to stand it any longer, he ran to the Rabbi for help. As he follows the Rabbi's unlikely advice, the poor man's life goes from bad to worse, with increasingly uproarious results. In his little hut, silly calamity follows foolish catastrophe, all memorably depicted in full-color illustrations that are both funnier and lovelier than any this distinguished artist has done in the past.
  wichitafriendsschool | Jul 24, 2018 |
The setting of this books starts out in a very crowded house where there is no peace and quiet. The lack of personal space creates tension throughout the family. The Rabbi suggested to one by one bring animals into the house. After the house is completely full begin to start taking the animals out. The house will soon feel spacious again. For this the students can work together to see if they can brainstorm different ideas about ways to solve the conflict in the story. This story can be used for older grades such as second through fifth grade. ( )
  LyndsayGagner | Apr 23, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my friend Gina, with love
c. 1 The J. Joseph Family
c. 2 In Honor of Rabbi Pollack
First words
Once upon a time in a small village a poor unfortunate man lived with his mother, his wife, and his six children in a little one-room hut.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374436363, Paperback)

Once upon a time a poor unfortunate man lived with his mother, his wife, and his six children in a one-room hut.

Because they were so crowded, the children often fought and the man and his wife argued. When the poor man was unable to stand it any longer, he ran to the Rabbi for help.

As he follows the Rabbi's unlikely advice, the poor man's life goes from bad to worse, with increasingly uproarious results. In his little hut, silly calamity follows foolish catastrophe, all memorably depicted in full-color illustrations that are both funnier and lovelier than any this distinguished artist has done in the past.
 
It Could Always Be Worse is a 1977 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year and Outstanding Book of the Year, and a 1978 Caldecott Honor Book.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:44 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Unable to stand his overcrowded and noisy home any longer, a poor man goes to the Rabbi for advice.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.41)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 6
3.5 1
4 21
4.5
5 30

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 130,718,958 books! | Top bar: Always visible