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The Four Agreements - A Practical Guide To…
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The Four Agreements - A Practical Guide To Personal Freedom - A Toltec… (original 1997; edition 1997)

by Don Miguel Ruiz (Author)

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5,9911081,320 (3.79)53
The author uses ancient Toltec wisdom to fashion a personal philosophy around these four principles--be impeccable with your word, don't take anything personally, don't make assumptions and always do your best.
Member:markoverman
Title:The Four Agreements - A Practical Guide To Personal Freedom - A Toltec Wisdom Book
Authors:Don Miguel Ruiz (Author)
Info:Amber-allen Publ. (1997), Edition: Later Printing, 138 pages
Collections:MarkOverman, Your library
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The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Miguel Ruiz (1997)

Recently added byecb06c, shelleyp6, private library, GisselleT, dynastical, BethanyBlancher, lisabarlow, Appi
  1. 00
    The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature by Steven Pinker (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: God, Jesus, Virgin Mary, Yahweh, Allah, Mohammed, Shiva, Buddha, Zeus, Odin, Horus, Emperor of Heaven, Haile Selassie, Great Spirit, Spider Grandmother, Flying Spaghetti Monster—take a lesson:


    MOST PEOPLE ARE familiar with the idea that some of our ordeals come from a mismatch between the source of our passions in evolutionary history and the goals we set for ourselves today. People gorge themselves in anticipation of a famine that never comes, engage in dangerous liaisons that conceive babies they don’t want, and rev up their bodies in response to stressors from which they cannot run away.

    What is true for the emotions may also be true for the intellect. Some of our perplexities may come from a mismatch between the purposes for which our cognitive faculties evolved and the purposes to which we put them today. This is obvious enough when it comes to raw data processing. People do not try to multiply six-digit numbers in their heads or remember the phone number of everyone they meet, because they know their minds were not designed for the job. But it is not as obvious when it comes to the way we conceptualize the world. Our minds keep us in touch with aspects of reality—such as objects, animals, and people—that our ancestors dealt with for millions of years. But as science and technology open up new and hidden worlds, our untutored intuitions may find themselves at sea.

    What are these intuitions? Many cognitive scientists believe that human reasoning is not accomplished by a single, general-purpose computer in the head. The world is a heterogeneous place, and we are equipped with different kinds of intuitions and logics, each appropriate to one department of reality. These ways of knowing have been called systems, modules, stances, faculties, mental organs, multiple intelligences, and reasoning engines. They emerge early in life, are present in every normal person, and appear to be computed in partly distinct sets of networks in the brain. They may be installed by different combinations of genes, or they may emerge when brain tissue self-organizes in response to different problems to be solved and different patterns in the sensory input. Most likely they develop by some combination of these forces.

    What makes our reasoning faculties different from the departments in a university is that they are not just broad areas of knowledge, analyzed with whatever tools work best. Each faculty is based on a core intuition that was suitable for analyzing the world in which we evolved. Though cognitive scientists have not agreed on a Gray’s Anatomy of the mind, here is a tentative but defensible list of cognitive faculties and the core intuitions on which they are based:
    • An intuitive physics, which we use to keep track of how objects fall, bounce, and bend. Its core intuition is the concept of the object, which occupies one place, exists for a continuous span of time, and follows laws of motion and force. These are not Newton’s laws but something closer to the medieval conception of impetus, an “oomph” that keeps an object in motion and gradually dissipates.
    • An intuitive version of biology or natural history, which we use to understand the living world. Its core intuition is that living things house a hidden essence that gives them their form and powers and drives their growth and bodily functions.
    • An intuitive engineering, which we use to make and understand tools and other artifacts. Its core intuition is that a tool is an object with a purpose—an object designed by a person to achieve a goal.
    • An intuitive psychology, which we use to understand other people. Its core intuition is that other people are not objects or machines but are animated by the invisible entity we call the mind or the soul. Minds contain beliefs and desires and are the immediate cause of behavior.
    • A spatial sense, which we use to navigate the world and keep track of where things are. It is based on a dead reckoner, which updates coordinates of the body's location as it moves and turns, and a network of mental maps. Each map is organized by a different reference frame: the eyes, the head, the body, or salient objects and places in the world.
    • A number sense, which we use to think about quantities and amounts. It is based on an ability to register exact quantities for small numbers of objects (one, two, and three) and to make rough relative estimates for larger numbers.
    • A sense of probability, which we use to reason about the likelihood of uncertain events. It is based on the ability to track the relative frequencies of events, that is, the proportion of events of some kind that turn out one way or the other.
    • An intuitive economics, which we use to exchange goods and favors. It is based on the concept of reciprocal exchange, in which one party confers a benefit on another and is entitled to an equivalent benefit in return.
    • A mental database and logic, which we use to represent ideas and to infer new ideas from old ones. It is based on assertions about what’s what, what’s where, or who did what to whom, when, where, and why. The assertions are linked in a mind-wide web and can be recombined with logical and causal operators such as AND, OR, NOT, ALL, SOME, NECESSARY, POSSIBLE, and CAUSE.
    • Language, which we use to share the ideas from our mental logic. It is based on a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of combinatorial rules. The rules organize vowels and consonants into words, words into bigger words and phrases, and phrases into sentences, in such a way that the meaning of the combination can be computed from the meanings of the parts and the way they are arranged.
    The mind also has components for which it is hard to tell where cognition leaves off and emotion begins. These include a system for assessing danger, coupled with the emotion called fear, a system for assessing contamination, coupled with the emotion called disgust, and a moral sense, which is complex enough to deserve a chapter of its own.

    These ways of knowing and core intuitions are suitable for the lifestyle of small groups of illiterate, stateless people who live off the land, survive by their wits, and depend on what they can carry. Our ancestors left this lifestyle for a settled existence only a few millennia ago, too recently for evolution to have done much, if anything, to our brains. Conspicuous by their absence are faculties suited to the stunning new understanding of the world wrought by science and technology. For many domains of knowledge, the mind could not have evolved dedicated machinery, the brain and genome show no hints of specialization, and people show no spontaneous intuitive understanding either in the crib or afterward. They include modern physics, cosmology, genetics, evolution, neuroscience, embryology, economics, and mathematics.

    It’s not just that we have to go to school or read books to learn these subjects. It’s that we have no mental tools to grasp them intuitively. We depend on analogies that press an old mental faculty into service, or on jerry-built mental contraptions that wire together bits and pieces of other faculties. Understanding in these domains is likely to be uneven, shallow, and contaminated by primitive intuitions. And that can shape debates in the border disputes in which science and technology make contact with everyday life. The point … is that together with all the moral, empirical, and political factors that go into these debates, we should add the cognitive factors: the way our minds naturally frame issues. Our own cognitive makeup is a missing piece of many puzzles, including education, bioethics, food safety, economics, and human understanding itself.
    … (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 106 (next | show all)
A handy little book that is full of wisdom. It is a quick read, or a slower one if you want to read and absorb, and even journal about, the chapters. There is a lot of information about living your best self and deepening your life's journey, and bringing happiness back into it. Definitely worth a re-read. ( )
  threadnsong | Dec 31, 2021 |
This is a great book. Everyone should read it and follow it. Incorporating the four agreements into your life will greatly improve it. I plan to read it many more times as reading it once is not enough to really make a difference. It was just enough to give me a taste of how much better life could be. ( )
  jenniebooknerd | Dec 31, 2021 |
BARRY

One star because you can't give someone cancer by telling them they look like they have cancer

There were a fair few allegations of abuse against this guy online, but they have all disappeared it looks like? I'm going to assume he is litigious.


Culty stuff... I mean.. "New religious movement"y stuff:
True, we find people who say their husband or wife, or mother or father, abused them, but you know that we abuse ourselves much more than that.

If you have the need to be abused, you will find it easy to be abused by others. Likewise, if you are with people who need to suffer, something in you makes you abuse them. It is as if they have a note on their back that says, "Please kick me." They are asking for justification for their suffering. Their addiction to suffering is nothing but an agreement that is reinforced every day.

Well, that's someone who can say they have a clear conscience!

Human gossip works exactly the same way. For example, you are beginning a new class with a new teacher and you have looked forward to it for a long time. On the first day of class, you run into
someone who took the class before, who tells you, "Oh that instructor was such a pompous jerk! He didn't know what he was talking about, and he was a pervert too, so watch out!" You are immediately imprinted with the word and the emotional code the person had when saying this, but what you are not aware of is his or her motivation in telling you. This person could be angry for failing the class or simply making an assumption based on fears prejudices, but because you have learned to ingest information like a child, some part of you believes the gossip, and you go on to the class.

As the teacher speaks, you feel the poison come up inside you and you don't realize you see the teacher through the eyes of the person who gave you that gossip. Then you start talking to other people in the class about this, and they start to see the teacher in the same way: as a jerk and a pervert. You really hate the class, and soon you decide to drop out. You blame the teacher, but it is gossip that is to blame.


Oh heaven forbid that hearing that teacher is a pervert would make me not appreciate how well he regurgitates other people's ideas! What wisdom I may have missed out on because of gossip! Oh no! ( )
  RebeccaBooks | Sep 16, 2021 |
I'm re-reading this now with some friends. It's an excellent book of teachings that are easy to understand and very often difficult to live up to. I find it a beautiful way of paying attention and buy copies to gift all the time. That is how much I value this practical tool of personal growth. ( )
  TainoWoman | Aug 3, 2021 |
This is New Age Content. I would recommend this to Middle-School students for reading practice.

If you have not formed a worldview of your own, you would like this.

If you are looking for something like this, I would recommend learning about worldview, religious traditions of human history, learning the differences. Almost all major religious tradition would refute the content in this work.

To the author Migel, don't take this personally.

Deus Vult,
Gottfried. ( )
  gottfried_leibniz | Jun 25, 2021 |
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To the Circle of Fire;
those who have gone before,
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and those who have yet to come.
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What you are seeing and hearing right now is nothing but a dream.
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The author uses ancient Toltec wisdom to fashion a personal philosophy around these four principles--be impeccable with your word, don't take anything personally, don't make assumptions and always do your best.

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Beyond Words Publishing

3 editions of this book were published by Beyond Words Publishing.

Editions: 1878424319, 187842436X, 1878424777

 

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