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The Call of the Wild & White Fang (Vintage…
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The Call of the Wild & White Fang (Vintage Classics) (edition 2011)

by Jack London

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4,094362,354 (4.02)6
Two classic tales of dogs, one part wolf and one a Saint Bernard/Scotch shepherd mix that becomes leader of a wolf pack, as they have adventures in the Yukon wilderness with both humans and other animals.
Member:megzanne
Title:The Call of the Wild & White Fang (Vintage Classics)
Authors:Jack London
Info:Random House UK (2011), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 344 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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The Call of the Wild / White Fang by Jack London

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English (35)  Catalan (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
I read this because it made a list of "Top Ten Books About Alaska." A turn of the 20th century story about a civilized California dog named Buck, who is stolen from civilization and transported to Alaska to be used as a sled dog during the Klondike Gold Rush. In the process of becoming a survivor in a true dog eat dog world, he exchanges civility for his inner wolf, and but for the love he finally shares with one human, he would ling since have answered the call of the wild and "returned" to his wolf pack. This where he ends the story, an Ur dog in an Ur pack somewhere between the reality of the Alaskan wilderness and the primordial world of the first hominids. As I type this, it sounds a bit cheesy, but I actually found this a good book to think with. Two things stood out to me; the treatment of animals seen as normative in this story reflects the world of the early 20th century, when all power was primarily horse power, and animals were thought of (and treated like) machines. The uncivilized treatment of Buck is a reflection on the time he lived and the place - Alaska, then as now, comes off as a thin margined, raw and real place of testing, where the rules are harsh and toughness is required. That reinforcement of Alaska's hard and harsh realities was the second lesson of this book. London's writing and keen powers of observation set this book apart. A good choice for an Alaska top 10 list, and an important reflection on the boundaries between, and the conditions conducive to, both civilization and the law of the wild. ( )
  mhall61 | Oct 5, 2021 |
It is interesting to compare and contrast these books. White Fang has a wild dog brought gradually into civilization and tameness. The Call of the Wild has a tame dog gradually regress into wildness, finally joining a wolf pack.

THIS REVIEW HAS BEEN CURTAILED IN PROTEST AT GOODREADS' CENSORSHIP POLICY

See the complete review here:

http://arbieroo.booklikes.com/post/335148/post ( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
This contains both The Call Of The Wild and its FOIL, White Fang. It's a good value if you want to read both classics, although the former is a stronger piece than the later. The Call Of The Wild is a touted classic for a reason and explores the journey of a domestic dog (from it's prospective) into, well, the wild. White Fang as noted is the inverse following a wolf-dogs journey into becoming mans best friend. They are must reads and excellent. The later is somewhat less impressive as White Fang is quite repetitive which can be dull and bothersome, especially when accompanying such as masterpiece as The Call Of The Wild. The former is a solid 4 star piece, the later 3 stars, but half stars aren't a thing here. I would recommend The Call Of The Wild to anyone interested in classical literature or animal-centric books. I would only recommend White Fang to those interested in more from London and have already read the former first. Thankfully this combination book allows for the freedom to read both if one desires, and cheaply. ( )
  LostArchive | Jan 22, 2020 |
This is a beautiful cloth-bound copy of The Call of the Wild and White Fang. I received a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. I love it! It is even nicer than it looks online, and the paper even feels nice and "fancy". These are two of favorite stories, and I love that they are included in one volume. ( )
  DominiqueMarie | Sep 22, 2019 |
London has given us a story of raw nature and humanity. With Darwin's evolution in mind, London sends us on two journeys that is as savage as it is beautiful, chaotic as it is poetic as we follow on the trail of a dog in "Call of the Wild" and a hybrid wolf-dog in "White Fang" in the the Klondike Gold Rush that occurred in the Yukon, north-western Canada between 1896 and 1899.

London's storytelling is vivid as he captures the primal, violent, self-preserving thoughts of his bestial protagonists, even amidst human cruelty, violence, and compassion. London seems to capture in these two stories, beasts that roam free and wild, without fetters and shadows humanity as it really is whether or not we believe in evolution or in God.

This specific edition of Call and the Wild and White Fang is an excellent edition due to its introduction of the author, Jack London, whose life is not only very interesting but illuminates the reading of his two novels to a greater level of appreciation. ( )
  atdCross | Jun 11, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (35 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jack Londonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bama, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gianquitto, TinaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rothberg, AbrahamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"Old longings nomadic leap,
chafing at custom's chain;
Again from its brumal sleep
Wakens the ferine strain."
Dedication
First words
(Call of the wild)
Buck did not read newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing.
(White Fang)
Dark spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Contains both (and only) Call of the wild and White fang.
The Wordsworth Classics edition (ISBN 1853260266) sometimes referred to as The Call of the Wild is actually an omnibus edition of both The Call of the Wild and White Fang, so it should not be combined with either individual work.
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Two classic tales of dogs, one part wolf and one a Saint Bernard/Scotch shepherd mix that becomes leader of a wolf pack, as they have adventures in the Yukon wilderness with both humans and other animals.

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Book description
I read this because it made a list of "Top Ten Books About Alaska." A turn of the 20th century story about a civilized California dog named Buck, who is stolen from civilization and transported to Alaska to be used as a sled dog during the Klondike Gold Rush. In the process of becoming a survivor in a true dog eat dog world, he exchanges civility for his inner wolf, and but for the love he finally shares with one human, he would ling since have answered the call of the wild and "returned" to his wolf pack. This where he ends the story, an Ur dog in an Ur pack somewhere between the reality of the Alaskan wilderness and the primordial world of the first hominids. As I type this, it sounds a bit cheesy, but I actually found this a good book to think with. Two things stood out to me; the treatment of animals seen as normative in this story reflects the world of the early 20th century, when all power was primarily horse power, and animals were thought of (and treated like) machines. The uncivilized treatment of Buck is a reflection on the time he lived and the place - Alaska, then as now, comes off as a thin margined, raw and real place of testing, where the rules are harsh and toughness is required. That reinforcement of Alaska's hard and harsh realities was the second lesson of this book. London's writing and keen powers of observation set this book apart. A good choice for an Alaska top 10 list, and an important reflection on the boundaries between, and the conditions conducive to, both civilization and the law of the wild.
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