HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Radiant Days (2009)

by Elizabeth Hand

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1017218,891 (3.76)3
She is a painter. He is a poet. Their art bridges time. It is 1978. Merle is in her first year at the Corcoran School of Art, catapulted from her impoverished Appalachian upbringing into a sophisticated, dissipated art scene. It is also 1870. The teenage poet Arthur Rimbaud is on the verge of breaking through to the images and voice that will make his name. The meshed power of words and art thins the boundaries between the present and the past--and allows these two troubled, brilliant artists to enter each other's worlds.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I really loved the liminal connecting character, Ted, and how he worked in the story. He was marvelous, really marvelous. I loved Merle's interactions with Arthur, and I was amused, rather than annoyed, by how long it took her to accept the reality that he had stepped out of the past. Merle's rationalizations seemed completely realistic. Merle herself I liked, too, but Arthur .... ehhh. He was at his most appealing interacting with Merle--talking about Plato's theory of a third sex, and reading his poetry--and when he was in Mazas Prison.

Anyway, read it for Ted, and for a relationship based on a desire to break the world and create it fresh, rather than that old standby, Eros. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
I really loved the liminal connecting character, Ted, and how he worked in the story. He was marvelous, really marvelous. I loved Merle's interactions with Arthur, and I was amused, rather than annoyed, by how long it took her to accept the reality that he had stepped out of the past. Merle's rationalizations seemed completely realistic. Merle herself I liked, too, but Arthur .... ehhh. He was at his most appealing interacting with Merle--talking about Plato's theory of a third sex, and reading his poetry--and when he was in Mazas Prison.

Anyway, read it for Ted, and for a relationship based on a desire to break the world and create it fresh, rather than that old standby, Eros. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
No matter what genre or age group, if Elizabeth Hand writes something, I will read it. Radiant Days is one of my favorites of her works now.
Merle is a teenage, an art student in DC who gets involved with an older woman. In short order she cuts classes, spends all her money, and gets kicked out of school. (Considering how often Hand's protagonists flunk out I have to wonder about her own education.) Things seem to keep getting worse, and eventually Merle's shared house becomes a dump with no utilities. And not long after she loses everything else which matters to her. That's when things get interesting...
On the other side, a young Arthur Rimbaud is dealing with his tyrannical mother then getting arrested while sneaking into Paris. France is at war with Prussia at this time, so life is rough and people aren't willing to trust strangers. Arthur does everything he can to keep from going home and continues to compose the poetry for which he will become immortal. One night he falls into a dream... and the power of art breaks down time.

I don't want to share too much of the plot, because you need to read it! Both learn how to make art and make magic, and make more of their lives than they can ever have imagined.

The portrayal of two young people, both of whom are gay/queer and not having that be the focal point of the story, needs to happen much more often in fiction. Also keep your eyes open for a possible legend of a secondary character. ( )
  quantumbutterfly | Jan 27, 2013 |
In Radiant Days, one of Elizabeth Hand's latest books, we are introduced to Rimbaud, the poet, and Merle, an artist. Set in two distinctly different periods of time, but overlapping via an abandoned lockhouse, the lives of the two artist bump intoeach other in ways that enrich the works of both. All artists, be they workers in charcoal, or with a can of spray paint, or drawing with words on a page, will relate to that feeling when the art “comes true”, as it frequently does for these two artists. Of much interest to me was the exploration of synaesthesia and how it influenced Rimbaud's work so intently that even non-synaesthetes can feel it. Those who find it as interesting as I did can get further input at http://www.doctorhugo.org/synaesthesia/rimbaud.html ( )
  Nightwing | Dec 15, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

She is a painter. He is a poet. Their art bridges time. It is 1978. Merle is in her first year at the Corcoran School of Art, catapulted from her impoverished Appalachian upbringing into a sophisticated, dissipated art scene. It is also 1870. The teenage poet Arthur Rimbaud is on the verge of breaking through to the images and voice that will make his name. The meshed power of words and art thins the boundaries between the present and the past--and allows these two troubled, brilliant artists to enter each other's worlds.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.76)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 3
3.5 3
4 8
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 165,991,558 books! | Top bar: Always visible