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Keeping Corner by Kashmira Sheth
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Keeping Corner

by Kashmira Sheth

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3973026,945 (3.79)3
  1. 00
    Karma by Cathy Ostlere (kaledrina)
  2. 00
    Homeless Bird by Gloria Whelan (joririchardson)
    joririchardson: Both of these YA books have similar plots and are both set in 1900's India.
  3. 00
    Climbing the Stairs by Padma Venkatraman (meggyweg)
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    Beneath My Mother's Feet by Amjed Qamar (foggidawn)
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Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
Amazing book, really intriguing and eye opening. A bit sad at times.
  madisenowen | May 4, 2016 |
This has been on my "To Read" list for about a year. I thoroughly loved learning about the Indian culture, arranged marriages, the Indian caste system and what is was like for women in the early 1900's. The story seemed to drag a little but it was interesting. I think I had more hope for the story than there was. Curricular connections: equal rights, woman's rights, compare and contrast. ( )
  amyruotsala | Apr 8, 2016 |
This book opens readers' eyes to a very different culture but one starting to change dramatically. I like the perspective - itshows the main character, Leela, and her family evolving as they cope with historical changes in India. The historical context of the story (India during the time of Gandhi) is made accessible because the reader learns of these events from the perspective of Leela and her family.

This book would be an excellent choice to expose students studying world history to traditional Indian culture and some of the history of that country.
  Sheila.Bonnand | Mar 16, 2016 |
In India in the 1940s, a thirteen-year-old girl named Leela, is a happy, spoiled girl and got married when she and her husband were age nine. Her husband, who she barely knows dies, leaving her a widow whose only hope of happiness could come from Mahatma Ghandi's social and political reforms.
  mbrandel | Feb 21, 2016 |
Summary: A young widowed girl has to be in a year of morning, locked away in her house. In this year of morning, she pursues her own education, finds herself, and learns of independence. In the meantime, the country in which she lives in is following Ghandi searching for independence on their own. ( )
  mloya | Feb 18, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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In loving memory of my great-aunt Maniben Trivedi.
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Finally, I could hear the bells on our bullocks' necks as Lakha hitched them to the cart.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0786838604, Paperback)

Ba slipped the gold bangles from my wrists. The gold ones were plain so I didn’t mind taking them off, but I loved wearing my milk-glass bangles and the lakkh bracelets.  

"A widow can't wear bangles,” she said. "They are signs of a woman's good fortune.  When your husband dies it's over."

"What if my good fortune comes back?"

“It doesn’t.”
 
Pretty as a peacock, twelve-year-old Leela had been spoiled all her life.  She doesn't care for school and barely marks the growing unrest between the British colonists and her own countrymen.  Why should she? Her future has been planned since her engagement at two and marriage at nine.
 
Leela's whole life changes, though, when her husband dies.  She's now expected to behave like a proper widow:  shaving her head and trading her jewel-toned saris for rough, earth-colored ones. Leela is considered unlucky now, and will have to stay confined to her house for a year—keep corner—in preparation for a life of mourning for a boy she barely knew. 

When her schoolteacher hears of her fate, she offers Leela lessons at home. For the first time, despite her confinement, Leela opens her eyes to the changing world around her.  India is suffering from a severe drought, and farmers are unable to pay taxes to the British. She learns about a new leader of the people, a man named Gandhi, who starts a political movement and practices satyagraha—non-violent protest against the colonists as well as the caste system.  The quiet strength ofsatyagraha may liberate her country. Could she use the same path to liberate herself?  

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:02 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

In India in the 1940s, thirteen-year-old Leela's happy, spoiled childhood ends when her husband since age nine, whom she barely knows, dies, leaving her a widow whose only hope of happiness could come from Mahatma Ghandi's social and political reforms.… (more)

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