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The Shack by William P. Young
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The Shack (original 2008; edition 2008)

by William P. Young

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
12,540541347 (3.43)307
Mackenzie Allen Phillips' youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his Great Sadness, Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend. Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack's world forever. In a world where religion seems to grow increasingly irrelevant, "The Shack" wrestles with the timeless question, "Where is God in a world so filled with unspeakable pain?" The answers Mack gets will astound you and perhaps transform you as much as it did him.… (more)
Member:mhhza
Title:The Shack
Authors:William P. Young
Info:Windblown Media (2008), Edition: 1st, Paperback, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work details

The Shack by William P. Young (2008)

  1. 40
    Dinner with a Perfect Stranger by David Gregory (soflbooks)
    soflbooks: David Gregory's short story about a man who accepts a dinner invitation with Jesus is better written than The Shack and sticks to evangelical theology.
  2. 10
    Thrones For The Innocent by C. W. Kesting (Desmorph)
    Desmorph: Thrones for the Innocent is a stunning compliment to The Shack. It addresses the metaphysical mysteries of ontology and theology without preaching. Where The Shack speaks directly to and about God and the Christian Trinity; Thrones is both subliminal and aggressive. Thrones helped me deal with the frustration I felt in my own heart about the paradox of the existence of evil and and all-loving all-powerful Creator. Thrones is very spiritual and yet avoids struggling with the convolution of structured religion. it should raise some eyebrows as well as quiet some tortured hearts.… (more)
  3. 10
    Rooms by James L. Rubart (paulstalder)
    paulstalder: ähnliche Handlung: Ein Mann kommt in ein Haus und kommt mit seiner Vergangenheit ins Reine
  4. 00
    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer (PghDragonMan)
    PghDragonMan: Another story of searching for meaning after personal tragedy and questioning why bad things happen.
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» See also 307 mentions

English (522)  German (6)  Portuguese (Brazil) (5)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Italian (1)  French (1)  All languages (540)
Showing 1-5 of 522 (next | show all)
This is about a man who spends some time with God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit. I think many, many people with love it. For me, I struggled often because I felt like it was a really long Sunday School lesson sometimes. Other times, I got into what was happening quite a bit, but it was maybe too deep for me? Idk. If you're interested, you should definitely check it out for yourself. ( )
  ToniFGMAMTC | Feb 17, 2021 |
A Dangerous Book

As a pastor I can't recommend this book to anyone. While the story is complying, it is doctrinally so off that I believe Christians should avoid this book and writer at all cost. ( )
  R-West | Jan 25, 2021 |
Not recommended – but it's not unreadable.

The narrative was weak and predictable - a basic forgiveness story - while the source material, the Bible and Christian theology was perverted to the point of pure heresy. While it may not be in the same vein of a systematic theology book, it is nevertheless a theology book wrapped in a fictional narrative. It betrays the Scriptures in many ways, and doesn't even engage with them directly.

If you wish to read it for the plot, go ahead. But if you wish to read it to improve your relationship with God, I can recommend several other books over this. Go read your Bible or A Pilgrim's Progress. ( )
  redeemedronin | Dec 28, 2020 |
wow, absolutely amazing story. So much wisdom contained within and made me think a lot ( )
  zacchaeus | Dec 26, 2020 |
The Shack is an interesting, if elementary, discussion on why bad things happen to good people and the nature of God. The writing, however, is sloppy and riddled with metaphors that a good editor should have weeded out entirely. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 522 (next | show all)
Young's too-weird-for-the-pulpit thoughts about how Adam's rib and the female uterus form a "circle of relationship" have the appeal of knobby heirloom-produce in a world where much religion arrives vacuum-packed. His theories—how to believe in Adam while supporting particle-physics research; why the Lord is OK with your preference for lewd funk more than staid church music—accomplish what mainstream faiths tend to fail at: connecting recondite doctrine to the tastes, rhythms, and mores of modern life. ... And though the novel, as a novel, is a sinner's distance from perfection, it's an eloquent reminder that, for those who give some faith and effort to the writing craft, there is, even today, the chance to touch and heal enough strangers to work a little miracle.
added by eromsted | editSlate, Nathan Heller (Jun 3, 2010)
 
Would I recommend this book? No, I would not. It is full of theological problems as well as an irreverent and casual attitude toward God. Yes, there are nice things in it and people might even be helped by the book. But so what? There are some nice things in Mormonism, too. Should we encourage people to read the Book of Mormon because Mormonism might help someone feel better? Not at all.

Sadly, experience has shown me that most Christians aren't interested in biblical fidelity. No, I'm not talking about biblical nit-picking. I'm talking about fidelity to the revealed word of God to the point where we don't contradict what is plainly stated in scripture!

We Christians should regard the word of God as the final authority on all things, and any supposed accounts of actual occurrences should be compared to scripture, not our feelings, wants, and desires. In the case of The Shack, the book falls woefully short of scriptural truth in many important areas and has the strong ability to mislead people regarding God's nature, work, and plan for us.

Again, I do not recommend it.
 
Focusing on just three of the subjects William
Young discusses in The Shack, we’ve seen that
errors abound. He presents a false view of God
and one that may well be described as heretical. He downplays the importance and uniqueness of the Bible, subjugating it or making it equal to other forms of subjective revelation. He misrepresents redemption and salvation, opening the door to the possibility of salvation outside of the completed work of Jesus Christ on the cross. We are left with an unbiblical understanding of the persons and nature of God and of His work in this world.
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William P. Youngprimary authorall editionscalculated
Young, William PaulAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Cummings, Bradsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wayne Jacobsensecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mueller, RogerNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
This story was written for my children:

Chad-the Gentle Deep,
Nicholas-the Tender Explorer,
Andrew-the Kindhearted Affection,
Amy-the Joyful Knower,
Alexandra (Lexi)-the Shining Power,
Matthew-the Becoming Wonder

And dedicated first, to:

Kim, my Beloved, thank you for saving my life.
And second, to:

"...All us stumblers who believe Love rules. Stand up and let it shine."
First words
Foreword:

Who wouldn't be skeptical when a man claims to have spent an entire weekend with God, in a shack no less?
March unleashed a torrent of rainfall after an abnormally dry winter.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Mackenzie Allen Phillips' youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his Great Sadness, Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend. Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack's world forever. In a world where religion seems to grow increasingly irrelevant, "The Shack" wrestles with the timeless question, "Where is God in a world so filled with unspeakable pain?" The answers Mack gets will astound you and perhaps transform you as much as it did him.

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Book description
Mackenzie Allen Philips' youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation, and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his "Great Sadness," Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend.

Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack's world forever.

In a world where religion seems to grow increasingly irrelevant The Shack wrestles with the timeless question, "Where is God in a world so filled with unspeakable pain?" The answers Mack gets will astound you and perhaps transform you as much as it did him. You'll want everyone you know to read this book!
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Average: (3.43)
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Hachette Book Group

6 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0964729237, 0964729245, 0964729261, 0964729288, 1935170007, 1600246869

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