HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text) by…
Loading...

Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text) (original 1719; edition 2000)

by Eliza Haywood (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
371854,410 (3.14)37
Eliza Haywood (1693-1756) was one of the most successful writers of her time; indeed, the two most popular English novels in the early eighteenth-century were Robinson Crusoeand Haywood's first novel, Love in Excess. As this edition enables modern readers to discover, its enormous success is easy to understand. Love in Excessis a well crafted novel in which the claims of love and ambition are pursued through multiple storylines until the heroine engineers a melodramatic conclusion. Haywood's frankness about female sexuality may explain the later neglect of Love in Excess. (In contrast, her accomplished domestic novel, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, has remained available.) Love in Excessand its reception provide a lively and valuable record of the challenge that female desire posed to social decorum. For the second Broadview edition, the appendix of eighteenth-century responses to Haywood has been considerably expanded.… (more)
Member:Saviarre
Title:Love in Excess (Broadview Literary Text)
Authors:Eliza Haywood (Author)
Info:Broadview Press (2000), Edition: 2, 296 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Love in Excess by Eliza Haywood (1719)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 37 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Love in Excess Eliza Heywood
3 stars

The story of the Count Delmont and the various women whose misfortune it is to fall in love with him.

I would class this as kind of very early chic lit there are humourous scenes and sad scenes and if anyone writes a letter it is bound to end up in the wrong hands, however by the end of the novel the various crossed wires have cleared themselves up leaving the way for a happy ending.

In some ways this reminded me off The Princess of Cleves and A Midsummers Night Dream.

It was quiet farcical with all the mistaken identities and various bed hopping episodes and quiet an amusing read ( )
  BookWormM | Jan 15, 2016 |
How is this any different from Princess of Cleves? It's just as dull, boring, uninteresting, uncompelling, and dreadful. The only difference is that a few elements were ratcheted up several degrees, such as the note-passing, bodice-ripping, and general, deplorable, ghastly, objectionable whoredom. It's too overt a conceit that women who are frank about their sexuality and desires conveniently drop dead, while those who are chaste get to skate. No fair that D'elmont gets to live happily ever after while leaving ruined lives in his wake. How good looking IS this guy anyway, that so many surrendered themselves to him to the ultimate fault? Ladies, there are other gentlemen available on earth, go find one. Jeez, nobody deserves to have so much vaginal pining offered up to him. The book is garbage. ( )
  MartinBodek | Oct 21, 2015 |
How is this any different from Princess of Cleves? It's just as dull, boring, uninteresting, uncompelling, and dreadful. The only difference is that a few elements were ratcheted up several degrees, such as the note-passing, bodice-ripping, and general, deplorable, ghastly, objectionable whoredom. It's too overt a conceit that women who are frank about their sexuality and desires conveniently drop dead, while those who are chaste get to skate. No fair that D'elmont gets to live happily ever after while leaving ruined lives in his wake. How good looking IS this guy anyway, that so many surrendered themselves to him to the ultimate fault? Ladies, there are other gentlemen available on earth, go find one. Jeez, nobody deserves to have so much vaginal pining offered up to him. The book is garbage. ( )
  MartinBodek | Oct 21, 2015 |
What a delightful, unique novel! The novel is comprised of three sections, each of which is almost a complete story. In the first part, the protagonist Alovisa falls in love with the charming D'Elmont. As a woman in 18th century Paris, social etiquette forbids her from indicating her interest (until after he proposes!). So Alovisa sends him an anonymous, flirtatious note. At the next ball D'Elmont, meets and begins to court Amena. With the help of devious servants and unfortunate circumstances, eventually D'Elmont is convinced to marry. In the second part, D'Elmont, now married, falls hopelessly in love with a young women of whom he is a legal guardian. His marriage quickly become an unhappy one with a jealous wife maneuvering to discover her rival and the husband plotting seduction. Hijinks ensue, resulting in tragedy for all concerned. In the final section, D'Elmont is in Italy, where once again several woman fall madly in love with him and even more unlikely hijinks ensue.

While the plots are operatic in scope and almost laugh-out-loud ridiculous, many of the female characters were developed into something more than stereotyped temptresses and convent girls (although some were caricatures designed to move the convoluted plots forward). For some reason, I expected the novel to be Alovisa's story and so it felt quite disjointed in the reading. The other major drawback is the complete lack of chapters or line-breaks, making it hard to read in short sessions as it is hard to pick up the story line again. Other than those minor complaints, I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. ( )
  ELiz_M | Jan 3, 2015 |
‘God! With what an air he walked! What new attractions dwelt in every motion – And when he returned the salutes of any that passed by him, how graceful was his bow! How lofty his mien, and yet, how affable! A sort of an inexpressible awful grandeur, blended with tender languishments, strikes the amazed beholder at once with fear and joy! Something beyond humanity shines around him! Such looks descending angels wear, when sent on heavenly embassies to some favourite mortal! Such is their form! Such radiant beams they dart; and with such smiles they temper their divinity with softness! Oh! With what pain did I restrain myself from flying to him! From rushing into his arms! From hanging on his neck, and wildly uttering all the furious wishes of my burning soul – I trembled – panted – raged with inward agonies.’

That is the effect Count D’Elmont – basically a eighteenth century Spencer from Made in Chelsea - has on just one woman in this lively novel about female desire, love and its consequences. He marries for ambition and the plot is the slow revealing to him of what really matters; loving a woman without a care for her fortune or position – although clearly it helps him if she is an exquisite beauty. Of the women who are his victims, each has a story to tell from the proud beauty Alovysa, foolish, deluded Amena and the virtuous but tempted Melliora. The comic, interfering female role is played by the intriguing Melantha who does not get her just desserts (hurray). ‘Melantha who was not of a humour to take anything to heart, was married in a short time, and had the good fortune not to be suspected by her husband, though she brought him a child in seven months after her wedding.’

Disgraces, cast-off daughters, duels to the death, kidnapped beauties and convents all feature in this exciting work. Haywood’s is a witty, entertaining pen writing stories that eighteenth-century young ladies must have sighed over – especially the dénouement when d’Elmont is alone in bed and his love comes to wake him and tell him her story. ‘Forgetting all decorum, he flew out of the bed, catched her in his arms, and almost stifled her with kisses; which she returning with pretty near an equal eagerness, ‘you will not chide me from me now?’ she cried.
  Sarahursula | Jul 11, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eliza Haywoodprimary authorall editionscalculated
Oakleaf, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
- in vain from Fate we fly,
For first or last, as all must die,
So 'tis as much decreed above,
That first or last, we all must love.
Lansdown
Dedication
To Mrs Oldfield
First words
In the late war between the French and the confederate armies, there were two brothers, who had acquired a more than ordinary reputation under the command of the great and intrepid Luxembourgh.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Eliza Haywood (1693-1756) was one of the most successful writers of her time; indeed, the two most popular English novels in the early eighteenth-century were Robinson Crusoeand Haywood's first novel, Love in Excess. As this edition enables modern readers to discover, its enormous success is easy to understand. Love in Excessis a well crafted novel in which the claims of love and ambition are pursued through multiple storylines until the heroine engineers a melodramatic conclusion. Haywood's frankness about female sexuality may explain the later neglect of Love in Excess. (In contrast, her accomplished domestic novel, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, has remained available.) Love in Excessand its reception provide a lively and valuable record of the challenge that female desire posed to social decorum. For the second Broadview edition, the appendix of eighteenth-century responses to Haywood has been considerably expanded.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Eliza Haywood (1693-1756) was one of the leading literary figures of her time; indeed, the two most popular works of English fiction in the early 18th century were Robinson Crusoe - and Haywood's first novel, Love In Excess. As this edition enables modern readers to discover, the books' enormous success is not hard to understand; it is a well-crafted novel that weaves themes of love and ambition together through multiple story lines to satisfyingly melodramatic conclusion.

The key reason for the neglect that Love In Excess suffered under for over two hundred years may be its frankness about female sexuality, particularly as expressed in the character of 'the matchless Melliora'. (Interestingly, the central work of Haywood's later moralistic phase, The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, has been widely reprinted.) Love in Excess and its reception, then, provide a lively and valuable record of erotic desire and the threat it posed to the decorum of society.
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.14)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5
2 5
2.5 6
3 15
3.5 4
4 9
4.5 3
5 4

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,612,479 books! | Top bar: Always visible