HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
SantaThing signup ends Monday at 12pm Eastern US. Check it out!
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Metamorphoses of Ovid by Ovid
Loading...

The Metamorphoses of Ovid (edition 2017)

by Ovid (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
11,21782463 (4.1)1 / 318
Metamorphoses--the best-known poem by one of the wittiest poets of classical antiquity--takes as its theme change and transformation, as illustrated by Greco-Roman myth and legend. Melville's new translation reproduces the grace and fluency of Ovid's style, and its modern idiom offers a fresh understanding of Ovid's unique and elusive vision of reality.… (more)
Member:Saviarre
Title:The Metamorphoses of Ovid
Authors:Ovid (Author)
Info:Mariner Books (2017), Edition: First, 572 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Metamorphoses by Ovid

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 318 mentions

English (71)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (2)  French (1)  Danish (1)  Finnish (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (82)
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
Interesting translation, lyrical prose rather than an attempt to shoehorn the poetry. This is one of the better translations if you're not a fan a poetry. A classic that I have found references to all over the place since I started reading it again. ( )
  LeBleuUn | Nov 14, 2021 |
Myths are definitely one of my favorite aspects in studying history. The mystique of it, and the magic around them despite our modern explanations for many of the things myths explain. The myths in Ovid’s Metamorphoses were no exception, with the inclusion of well known and not so known myths. I highly recommend this as a read. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
If anyone wants to know where I go to get "stuff" for my books, and to what art I hopelessly measure up my "stuff," let me save you an interview. It's this book and very few others beside it. ( )
  EugenioNegro | Mar 17, 2021 |
Various myths and legends are strung together, with the common theme of physical transformations.

3/4 (Good).

I loved this book, and yet was also frequently bored. There are some bad stories, some great, and everything in between. When it's at its best, it's an unforgettable, etched-in-my-brain great. But even if they were all good stories, telling them in a single, giant poem, while impressive, is not helpful. ( )
  comfypants | Mar 3, 2021 |
testo latino a fronte con un saggio di Italo Calvino
  perseveranza | Feb 28, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (746 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ovidprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Anguillara, Giovanni Andrea dell'Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bernini, FerruccioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bosselaar, Didericus ErnestusEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dryden, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ehwald, RudolfEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Feeney, DenisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garth, Sir SamuelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gay, ZhenyaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Golding, ArthurTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gregory, HoraceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hane-Scheltema, M. d'Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haupt, MorizEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Humphries, RolfeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Innes, M. M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knox, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Korn, OttoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mandelbaum, AllenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martin, CharlesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Müller, Hermann JohannesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miller, Frank JustusTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parramon i Blasco, JordiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pattist, M.J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepermans, G. M. A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pepermans, G. M. A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Proosdij, B.A. vanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raeburn, DavidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tarrant, R. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tissol, GarthIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vondel, Joost van denTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Contains

Is retold in

Has the adaptation

Inspired

Has as a reference guide/companion

Has as a study

Has as a commentary on the text

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This translation of Ovid's seamless song
is inscribed to my brother in law and in love,
Leonard Feldman, and my sister, Rayma.
First words
Now I shall tell you of things that change, new being / Out of old: since you, O Gods, created / Mutable arts and gifts, give me the voice / To tell the shifting story of the world / From its beginning to the present hour.
My purpose is to tell of bodies which have been transformed into shapes of a different kind. You heavenly powers, since you were responsible for those changes, as for all else, look favourably on my attempts, and spin an unbroken thread of verse, from the earliest beginnings of the world, down to my own times. [Mary M. Innes translation, Penguin Books, 1955]
My soul would sing of metamorphoses.
(Tr. Allan Mandelbaum)
My mind would tell of forms changed into new bodies;  gods, into my undertakings (for you changed even those) breathe life and from the first origin of the world to my own times draw forth a perpetual song!
(Tr. Z Philip Ambrose)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Metamorphoses in translation.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Metamorphoses--the best-known poem by one of the wittiest poets of classical antiquity--takes as its theme change and transformation, as illustrated by Greco-Roman myth and legend. Melville's new translation reproduces the grace and fluency of Ovid's style, and its modern idiom offers a fresh understanding of Ovid's unique and elusive vision of reality.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.1)
0.5 1
1 10
1.5 6
2 42
2.5 10
3 204
3.5 48
4 426
4.5 68
5 474

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044789X, 0140422307

Indiana University Press

An edition of this book was published by Indiana University Press.

» Publisher information page

W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,363,853 books! | Top bar: Always visible