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George Whitefield: God's Anointed Servant in the Great Revival of the…

by Arnold A. Dallimore

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554435,113 (4.39)None
Do I need to be saved? God is holy. No sin will ever enter His presence, for "righteousness and judgment are the habitation of His throne" (Psalm 97:2). Man is sinful. "For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God" (Romans 3:23). Sin separates man from God. "But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid His face from you" (Isaiah 59:2). It is impossible for man to save himself. "By the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in His sight" (Romans 3:20). Can I be saved? God sent His Son to be your Savior. "Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins" (1 John 4:10). The living Savior invites sinners to receive Him. "Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:28). Forgiveness of sins and salvation can be yours today. "For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God" (1 Peter 3:18). How can I be saved? Agree with God that you are a lost sinner unable to save yourself. "God commendeth His love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us" (Romans 5:8). Believe that Jesus Christ died for your sins and ask Him to be your Savior. "As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on His name" (John 1:12). Confess the Lord Jesus Christ before men. "If thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved" (Romans 10:9)."Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that heareth My word, and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life" (John 5:24).… (more)
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The period 1741-1770, covered by this second and concluding volume, was not one of cloudless sunshine. It opened with the doctrinal conflict with the two Wesleys and with a serious division in Methodist ranks. But this was quickly followed by a visit to Scotland in which revival reached its high watermark. Then came years of unwavering effort to evangelize the people of the English-speaking world and to consolidate the gains. Multitudes of 'the humble poor' believed, and members of the aristocracy heard the message of grace. An outstanding biography, popularly written, and with an urgent message for the present day.
  Paul_Brunning | Apr 26, 2016 |
George Whitefield's life was absolutely amazing. He is a man remarkably used by God in the 18th century. He's the kind of guy that makes your jaw drop.

From his early twenties to his death at age 55, he preached 30,000 sermons! That's an average of 20 sermons a week for his entire adult life! There were times when he would be speaking 40-60 hours a week--that's speaking time, not including any personal study or travel time.

We must also remember the sizes of the crowds he would speak to. Benjamin Franklin estimated he could be heard audibly by a crowd of 30,000 people. He is reported to have spoken to crowds of at least that much, crowds filling 3 acres.

Here was a man of unique eloquence in speaking, unique passion and zeal for the Lord, unique energy for sacrificial, and unique effectiveness in preaching. God used him for the revival of religion not only in England but also in America. Read this book to get excited about what God did during that time, and excited about what God might do again at any time he may so please!

This is a wonderful biography of this man's life. The author (Dallimore) has also written a two-volume biography of Whitefield, each volume running about 600 pages! He has condensed this full work into this short 200-page abridged version. It is the life of Whitefield in high gear indeed! It is fast paced, and keeps you on the edge of your seat from the get-go.

Read this for a great introduction to the life of George Whitefield. Though, I must admit, after reading this, I definitely want to get into the more in-depth two volume work!

[http://matthauck.typepad.com/blog/2010/09/george-whitefield-in-high-gear.html] ( )
  matthauck | Sep 2, 2010 |
"Justice has at last been done to the greatest preacher that England every produced." This was the judgment of Martyn Lloyd-Jones concerning the first volume of Arnold Dallimore's biography of George Whitefield. This is perhaps the most authoritative work to date on the life of Whitefield, surpassing the older work of Luke Tyreman in both breadth (since Dallimore had access to far more material than Tyreman) and objectivity (Tyreman was a Wesleyan who was somewhat unsympathetic with Whitefield's theology).

The two volumes together are divided into eight parts, which help give some navigation to understanding Whitefield's life. The sections are: (Volume 1): I. The Years of Preparation; II. The Youthful Ministry; III. The Period of Transition; (Volume 2): IV. The Controversy; V. The Calvinist Evangelist of Two Continents; VI. The Helper of all the Revival; VII. The Years of Failing Strength; and VIII. Death and Commemoration.

Volume 1 traces Whitefield's life from birth to conversion through the early years of the Great Awakening which came under his preaching in England, Wales, and the Colonies of North America. It is full of details about his travels, excerpts from sermons and journals, and is exceptionally well documented. Special attention is rightfully given to Whitefield's relationship with John Wesley, and several mistaken notions concerning the two men are corrected with careful research supporting the conclusions.

The second volume begins with an introduction that gives more attention to the mistaken conceptions about Whitefield's relationship with the Wesleys. Chapter one then steers the reader back into the narrative, picking up where volume 1 left off with Whitefield's return to England from America in 1739. Several chapters are then devoted to the controversy between the Whitefield and Wesley. A broad-brush coverage is given to Whitefield's work in both Great Britain and America, with occasional detours detailing events such as the Cambuslang Revival and the contributions of other prominent figures in the revival such Howell Harris and John Cennick.

Dallimore writes with an obvious admiration and appreciation for Whitefield, yet he does not whitewash his faults. Whitefield's respectable, though less than ideal marriage to the widow, Elizabeth James (who had also been courted by Howell Harris - an interesting love-triangle there!) is discussed, as well has the enormous load of debt he carried for the Orphan House founded in Georgia. While there was nothing in Whitefield's life to tarnish his integrity, his humanity is clearly evident in more than one instance.

The interest and usefulness of this excellent biography is enhanced by the thorough index (at the end of volume 2), thirteen appendices (six in volume 1, seven in volume 2), thorough documentation (with hundreds - maybe thousands - of footnotes), nine-page bibliography (volume 2) and over sixty illustrations.

But the true value of the two volumes lies in their soul-stirring account of the great work of God in and through Whitefield's life. A Christian could hardly ask for more delightful reading. To quote Lloyd-Jones again, "To read the wonderful story of his life is to be reminded again of what is possible to a truly consecrated Christian, and how even in the darkest and most sinful ages God in His sovereign power is able to revive His work and shower blessings upon His people." ( )
  brianghedges | Oct 23, 2009 |
"Justice has at last been done to the greatest preacher that England every produced." This was the judgment of Martyn Lloyd-Jones concerning the first volume of Arnold Dallimore's biography of George Whitefield. This is perhaps the most authoritative work to date on the life of Whitefield, surpassing the older work of Luke Tyreman in both breadth (since Dallimore had access to far more material than Tyreman) and objectivity (Tyreman was a Wesleyan who was somewhat unsympathetic with Whitefield's theology).

The two volumes together are divided into eight parts, which help give some navigation to understanding Whitefield's life. The sections are: (Volume 1): I. The Years of Preparation; II. The Youthful Ministry; III. The Period of Transition; (Volume 2): IV. The Controversy; V. The Calvinist Evangelist of Two Continents; VI. The Helper of all the Revival; VII. The Years of Failing Strength; and VIII. Death and Commemoration.

Volume 1 traces Whitefield's life from birth to conversion through the early years of the Great Awakening which came under his preaching in England, Wales, and the Colonies of North America. It is full of details about his travels, excerpts from sermons and journals, and is exceptionally well documented. Special attention is rightfully given to Whitefield's relationship with John Wesley, and several mistaken notions concerning the two men are corrected with careful research supporting the conclusions.

The second volume begins with an introduction that gives more attention to the mistaken conceptions about Whitefield's relationship with the Wesleys. Chapter one then steers the reader back into the narrative, picking up where volume 1 left off with Whitefield's return to England from America in 1739. Several chapters are then devoted to the controversy between the Whitefield and Wesley. A broad-brush coverage is given to Whitefield's work in both Great Britain and America, with occasional detours detailing events such as the Cambuslang Revival and the contributions of other prominent figures in the revival such Howell Harris and John Cennick.

Dallimore writes with an obvious admiration and appreciation for Whitefield, yet he does not whitewash his faults. Whitefield's respectable, though less than ideal marriage to the widow, Elizabeth James (who had also been courted by Howell Harris - an interesting love-triangle there!) is discussed, as well has the enormous load of debt he carried for the Orphan House founded in Georgia. While there was nothing in Whitefield's life to tarnish his integrity, his humanity is clearly evident in more than one instance.

The interest and usefulness of this excellent biography is enhanced by the thorough index (at the end of volume 2), thirteen appendices (six in volume 1, seven in volume 2), thorough documentation (with hundreds - maybe thousands - of footnotes), nine-page bibliography (volume 2) and over sixty illustrations.

But the true value of the two volumes lies in their soul-stirring account of the great work of God in and through Whitefield's life. A Christian could hardly ask for more delightful reading. To quote Lloyd-Jones again, "To read the wonderful story of his life is to be reminded again of what is possible to a truly consecrated Christian, and how even in the darkest and most sinful ages God in His sovereign power is able to revive His work and shower blessings upon His people." ( )
  brianghedges | Oct 23, 2009 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Do I need to be saved? God is holy. No sin will ever enter His presence, for "righteousness and judgment are the habitation of His throne" (Psalm 97:2). Man is sinful. "For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God" (Romans 3:23). Sin separates man from God. "But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid His face from you" (Isaiah 59:2). It is impossible for man to save himself. "By the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in His sight" (Romans 3:20). Can I be saved? God sent His Son to be your Savior. "Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins" (1 John 4:10). The living Savior invites sinners to receive Him. "Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:28). Forgiveness of sins and salvation can be yours today. "For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God" (1 Peter 3:18). How can I be saved? Agree with God that you are a lost sinner unable to save yourself. "God commendeth His love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us" (Romans 5:8). Believe that Jesus Christ died for your sins and ask Him to be your Savior. "As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on His name" (John 1:12). Confess the Lord Jesus Christ before men. "If thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved" (Romans 10:9)."Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that heareth My word, and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life" (John 5:24).

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