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Sons of the Conquerors: The Rise of the Turkic World

by Hugh Pope

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1423141,468 (3.75)4
"Wall Street Journal correspondent Hugh Pope provides a vivid picture of the descendants of the nomad armies who once conquered China and the Byzantine Empire. He shows the myriad connections that live on between Turks in the Xinjiang province of western China (one of that country's few remaining bastions of rebellion), through Central Asia, Iran, Iraq, the Netherlands, Germany (where Turkish can be heard on every other street corner of Berlin), and all the way to the Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Along the way he reassesses a history in which Islamic lands were ruled by Turkic dynasties - before their ascendancy was broken by the rising power of Europe, Russia, and China - among them the Moguls, who conquered India, the Safavids, who laid the foundations of modern Iran, and the Ottomans, whose five-century-long empire encompassed Turkey, the Balkans, and the Middle East."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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Fascinating window into modern day Turkey, its relationship with and influence on central Asia. ( )
  ossi | Aug 27, 2016 |
Sons of the Conquerors is an interesting history and review of the current statuses of the Turkic peoples and their nation states from Turkey to western China and their diasporas into the West.

Hugh Pope, the author, bases the book largely on his personal experience as a reporter visiting or stationed for most of his career in Turkey and other areas of the Turkic world. His analysis is not deep in an academic sense, but it is interestingly based on a lot of first hand experience.

A good read and you will learn a lot about interesting (or even pivotal) areas of thw world that are otherwise not well known in terms of books.
  BillHall | Feb 20, 2010 |
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"Wall Street Journal correspondent Hugh Pope provides a vivid picture of the descendants of the nomad armies who once conquered China and the Byzantine Empire. He shows the myriad connections that live on between Turks in the Xinjiang province of western China (one of that country's few remaining bastions of rebellion), through Central Asia, Iran, Iraq, the Netherlands, Germany (where Turkish can be heard on every other street corner of Berlin), and all the way to the Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Along the way he reassesses a history in which Islamic lands were ruled by Turkic dynasties - before their ascendancy was broken by the rising power of Europe, Russia, and China - among them the Moguls, who conquered India, the Safavids, who laid the foundations of modern Iran, and the Ottomans, whose five-century-long empire encompassed Turkey, the Balkans, and the Middle East."--BOOK JACKET.

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