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Dark Is The Sun by Philip José Farmer
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Dark Is The Sun (1979)

by Philip José Farmer

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285339,557 (3.62)1 / 6
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The Centaur-like figure in the Illustration is a plant-man, and the world is 15,000,000,000 years older. The planet's running down and the mebers of the quest team are engaged in a revenge journey. Entertaining. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Apr 28, 2014 |
Dark is the Sun follows Deyv, a young man on an Earth of several billion years from now, as he proceeds through three quests. At first, he sets out to find a mate. This quest quickly becomes a quest to hunt down a thief who steals his soul egg, a person’s most precious material possession. In the process, he synchs up with an Archkerri, a creature genetically engineered by the humans of many generations past, who tells him that the world will soon end, fried by the clustered stars in Earth’s vicinity. (The novel was written when the Big Crunch hypothesis seemed to be better supported by the data than has been the case lately.) This leads to a third quest, an attempt to flee to another planet or another universe, in which the human race can abide. In the course of his quests, Deyv meets a witch, an alien, a crafty creature of free and easy moral principles who is a distant descendant of foxes, and many other exotic creatures. He and his companions also encounter many artifacts which have survived from earlier, more technologically advanced generations of humans, e.g., rubber roads (traffic lights still working), indestructible buildings, the soul egg trees, which are creations of earlier humans’ biotechnology, and more. Given all this, the setting itself becomes one of the most interesting elements of the novel. ( )
  Carnophile | Dec 23, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Farmer, Philip Joséprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sweet,Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
In alphabetical order,
to my granddaughters Andrea Josephsohn and Kimberley Ladd
My daughter Kristen
My grandson Matthew Josephsohn
My son Philip Larid
My granddaughter Stephanie Josephsohn
my grandson Torin Paul Farmer
and to any descendants of my wife
Bette Virginia Andree, 
and of myself fifteen billion years fron now, when this story takes place.
First words
Black was the sun; bright in the sky.
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Book description
Fifteen billion years from now, Earth is a dying planet - its skies darkened by the ashes of burned-out galaxies. It's molten core long cooled.

But young Deyv of the Turtle Tribe knew nothing of his world's history or his fate. 
He lived only to track down the wretched Yawtl, who had stolen his precious Soul Egg. Together with Vana, a girl from another tribe, and the plant man Sloosh - both also victims of the same thief - they tailed the thief across a nigthmare landscape of monster haunted jungle and wetland.

The search for the Soul Eggs led the troupe into deeper and deeper peril - first to the lair of Feersh the Blind, the witch who had ordered the thefts; then to the Bright Abomination, the jeweled wasteland that harbored The Shemlbob, the ageless being from another star who knew Earth's end was near ... and held the key to the only way for any to escape that end.
    THE FOOTPRINTS WERE AT LEAST TWO HUNDRED FEET LONG

They were deep enough that they were clear, despite their size. They looked humanoid, but the toes were armed with claws.

Ahead, there were three carcasses, ripped apart and chewed and mangled.

Nearby were big trees that had been uprooted, probably by a kick, and others that had been broken off, as if the thing had stepped on them. the breathing and the sound like a mountain being torn apart were much louder now.

"I think we've come close enough," Vana whispered.

"Too close,"Deyv said.

They ran. From behind them came a bellow, so loud that it was as though the sky had split. then they saw the dim, gigantic hulk advancing toward them.
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Fifteen billion years from now, Earth is a dying planet, its skies darkened by the ashes of burned-out galaxies, its molten core long cooled. The sunless planet is nearing the day of final gravitational collapse in the surrounding galaxy. Mutations and evolution have led to a great disparity of life-forms, while civilization has resorted to the primitive. Young Deyv of the Turtle Tribe knew nothing of his world's history or its fate. He lived only to track down the wretched Yawtl who had stolen his precious Soul Egg. Joined by other victims of the same thief?the feisty Vana and the plant-man Sloosh?the group sets off across a nightmare landscape of monster-haunted jungle and wetland. Their search leads them ultimately to the jeweled wasteland of the Shemibob, an ageless being from another star who knows Earth's end is near and holds the only key to escape.… (more)

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