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The New York Trilogy

by Paul Auster

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The New York Trilogy (omnibus)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,203150695 (3.87)407
Paul Auster's brilliant debut novels, City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room brought him international acclaim for his creation of a new genre, mixing elements of the standard detective fiction and postmodern fiction.City of Glass combines dark, Kafka-like humor with all the suspense of a Hitchcock film as a writer of detective stories becomes embroiled in a complex and puzzling series of events, beginning with a call from a stranger in the middle of the night asking for the author -- Paul Auster -- himself. Ghosts, the second volume of this interconnected trilogy, introduces Blue, a private detective hired to watch a man named Black, who, as he becomes intermeshed into a haunting and claustrophobic game of hide-and-seek, is lured into the very trap he has created.The final volume, The Locked Room, also begins with a mystery, told this time in the first-person narrative. The nameless hero journeys into the unknown as he attempts to reconstruct the past which he has experienced almost as a dream. Together these three fictions lead the listener on adventures that expand the mind as they entertain."Auster harnesses the inquiring spirit any reader brings to a mystery, redirecting it from the grubby search for a wrongdoer to the more rarified search for the self." (New York Times Book Review)Bonus audio: James Atlas interview with the Author… (more)
Recently added byFageraasveien40, ejmw, private library, ThomasHunter, r17marti, ReggieJ44, DarrinLett, ZiggyF, rufus666
  1. 92
    The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami (alzo)
  2. 21
    The Book of Illusions by Paul Auster (caflores)
  3. 32
    Invisible by Paul Auster (ccf)
  4. 10
    Enormous Changes at the Last Minute: Stories by Grace Paley (claudiamesc)
    claudiamesc: E' stato anche tradotto in italiano: freschi, diretti, energici racconti ambientati a New York... per chi non si è entusiasmato con Auster, ma vuole farsi altri due passi in città.
  5. 01
    The City & The City by China Miéville (Longshanks)
    Longshanks: Two books that expand the scope of detective fiction beyond the genre's traditional concerns and constraints, one existentially and one sociopolitically.
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» See also 407 mentions

English (113)  Spanish (12)  Italian (7)  Dutch (4)  French (4)  German (2)  Catalan (2)  Portuguese (1)  Danish (1)  Swedish (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (148)
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
Brilliant. ( )
  grandpahobo | Apr 6, 2022 |
This trilogy is a set of three strange books. They all start off with a seemingly interesting plot, with the main character embarking on what seemed like an interesting mystery/adventure. Lots of questions yet unanswered, but the main character was going to do something to uncover these answers. And then, in the process of investigating, or examining, or putting two and two together, the main character suddenly became mentally unhinged :P Okay the author didn't present things that way; he never actually said they were crazy, but from my point of view, they just started having illogical thoughts and engaged in crazy behaviors, until the end of the book. It's as if NYC drives people mad? Same routines day after day drive people mad? Words, or the ineffectiveness of words, drive people mad? One's own mediocrity and helplessness to change that mediocrity drives people mad? I can't really tell. I do know the main characters did A LOT of crazy things. Anyways, I perceived the trilogy as an attempt to depict a sense of unease and dissatisfaction toward modern city life. ( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
I read the first two stories up to now. I enjoyed the first one better. Maybe because it’s surrealism seemed fresh, but by the time it finished the second story it felt a bit stale. I seldom don’t finish a book, but I just don’t feel the energy right now to tackle the third story.
Other bookalcoholics in this site will certainly understand my conundrum, but now I wonder, should I move this book to the “read” files, or leave it at the “currently-reading”? Should I just abandon it as it is, or force myself to read the last 80 pages or so?
The neurotic bookreader in me freezes faced with such decisions and does nothing. So the book sits here for now…
  RosanaDR | Apr 15, 2021 |
There's something about some higher-brow literary stuff that I find kind of stultifying, but at the same time there's something about these stories that I can't quite shake - deeply troubling in a good way. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |
Paul Auster’s signature work, The New York Trilogy, consists of three interlocking novels: City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room—haunting and mysterious tales that move at the breathless pace of a thriller.
  Centre_A | Nov 27, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 113 (next | show all)
Una llamada telefónica equivocada introduce a un escritor de novelas policiacas en una extraña historia de complejas relaciones paternofiliales y locura; un detective sigue a un hombre por un claustrofóbico universo urbano; la misteriosa desaparición de un amigo de la infancia confronta a un hombre con sus recuerdos. Tres novelas que proponen una relectura posmoderna del género policiaco y que supusieron la revelación de uno de los más interesantes novelistas de nuestro tiempo.
added by Pakoniet | editLecturalia
 

» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Auster, Paulprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barrett, JoeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bocchiola, MassimoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Figueiredo, RubensTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frank, Joachim A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Furlan, PierreTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jääskeläinen, JukkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sante, LucIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sellent Arús, JoanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sirola, JukkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spiegelman, ArtCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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It was a wrong number that started it, the telephone ringing three times in the dead of night, and the voice on the other end asking for someone he was not.
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"For our words no longer correspond to the world. When things were whole, we felt confident that our words could express them. But little by little these things have broken apart, shattered, collapsed into chaos. And yet our words have remained the same. They have not adapted themselves to the new reality. Hence, every time we try to speak of what we see, we speak falsely, distorting the very thing we are trying to represent."
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Paul Auster's brilliant debut novels, City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room brought him international acclaim for his creation of a new genre, mixing elements of the standard detective fiction and postmodern fiction.City of Glass combines dark, Kafka-like humor with all the suspense of a Hitchcock film as a writer of detective stories becomes embroiled in a complex and puzzling series of events, beginning with a call from a stranger in the middle of the night asking for the author -- Paul Auster -- himself. Ghosts, the second volume of this interconnected trilogy, introduces Blue, a private detective hired to watch a man named Black, who, as he becomes intermeshed into a haunting and claustrophobic game of hide-and-seek, is lured into the very trap he has created.The final volume, The Locked Room, also begins with a mystery, told this time in the first-person narrative. The nameless hero journeys into the unknown as he attempts to reconstruct the past which he has experienced almost as a dream. Together these three fictions lead the listener on adventures that expand the mind as they entertain."Auster harnesses the inquiring spirit any reader brings to a mystery, redirecting it from the grubby search for a wrongdoer to the more rarified search for the self." (New York Times Book Review)Bonus audio: James Atlas interview with the Author

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