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The Iliad / The Odyssey

by Homer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Homer's Epic Cycle (1-2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,470461,927 (4.14)59
Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are unquestionably two of the greatest epic masterpieces in Western literature. Though more than 2,700 years old, their stories of brave heroics, capricious gods, and towering human emotions are vividly timeless. The Iliad can justly be called the world's greatest war epic. The terrible and long-drawn-out siege of Troy remains one of the classic campaigns, the heroism and treachery of its combatants unmatched in song and story. Driven by fierce passions and loyalties, men and gods battle to a devastating conclusion. The Odyssey chronicles the many trials and adventures Odysseus must pass through on his long journey home from the Trojan wars to his beloved wife. Though the stormy god of the ocean has sworn vengeance against him, and witches and sirens try to lure him off course, Odysseus is clever and has the brilliant goddess Athena on his side.… (more)
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» See also 59 mentions

English (40)  French (2)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (45)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Homer’s two best known epics — “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey” — are two of my favorite history related pieces and two of my favorite (epic) poems.
There is a lot of repetition in these epics due to the fact that they were originally told orally — and over a few days — before being written down.
After reading both, I tend to prefer “The Odyssey,” but I definitely highly recommend both to any reader since these two epic poems have had such a great influence over modern day writing and storytelling. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
I haven't finished it. The recording and translation are fine, but I find the convention of introducing each section with a summary, the telling the tale, then ending the section with the summary again boring boyond words. If anyone knows of a version that avoides this (in print or audio), please let me know. ( )
  Lindsay_Wallace | Apr 16, 2021 |
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
Translated and read by Ennis Rees
  BIBLIOTECATLACUILO | Nov 13, 2020 |
Ajax and Odysseus wrestle for sport.
The winner gets a tripod worth 12 oxen...the loser gets a woman everyone agrees is worth 4. ( )
  arewenotmen | Jan 13, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (58 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Homerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adler, Mortimer JEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Armstrong, W. C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bruijn, J. C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butcher, S.H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butler, SamuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chapman, Georgesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fagles, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flaxman, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Friedrich, Wolf HartmutAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hutchins, Robert M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knox, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lattimore, RichmondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oldenburg Ermke, Frans vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pope, AlexanderTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schwartz, M.A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spoelder, C.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevens, DanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Velde, R. van derIndexsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voß, Johann HeinrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Von der Mühll, PeterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
An Friedrich Leopold
Grafen zu Stolberg
1780
First words
Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans.
Quotations
Then forth he came, his both knees falt'ring, both
/ His strong hands hanging down, and all with froth
/ His cheeks and nostrils flowing, voice and breath
/ Spent to all use, and down he sank to death. /
The sea had soak'd his heart through; all his veins
/ His toils had rack'd t'a labouring woman's pains, /
Dead-weary was he.
And Zeus said: “Hera, you can choose some other time for paying your visit to Oceanus — for the present let us devote ourselves to love and to the enjoyment of one another. Never yet have I been so overpowered by passion neither for goddess nor mortal woman as I am at this moment for yourself — not even when I was in love with the wife of Ixion who bore me Pirithoüs, peer of gods in counsel, nor yet with Danaë, the daintly ankled daughter of Acrisius, who bore me the famed hero Perseus. Then there was the daughter of Phonenix, who bore me Minos and Rhadamanthus. There was Semele, and Alcmena in Thebes by whom I begot my lion-hearted son Heracles, while Samele became mother to Bacchus, the comforter of mankind. There was queen Demeter again, and lovely Leto, and yourself — but with none of these was I ever so much enamored as I now am with you.”
Then forth he came, his both knees falt'ring, both / His strong hands hanging down, and all with froth / His cheeks and nostrils flowing, voice and breath / Spent to all use, and down he sank to death. / The sea had soak'd his heart through; all his veins / His toils had rack'd t'a labouring woman's pains, / Dead-weary was he.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work contains both (and only) The Iliad and The Odyssey. It should not be combined with either work separately or with Greek versions of the same texts (due to the "dead languages" exception).
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are unquestionably two of the greatest epic masterpieces in Western literature. Though more than 2,700 years old, their stories of brave heroics, capricious gods, and towering human emotions are vividly timeless. The Iliad can justly be called the world's greatest war epic. The terrible and long-drawn-out siege of Troy remains one of the classic campaigns, the heroism and treachery of its combatants unmatched in song and story. Driven by fierce passions and loyalties, men and gods battle to a devastating conclusion. The Odyssey chronicles the many trials and adventures Odysseus must pass through on his long journey home from the Trojan wars to his beloved wife. Though the stormy god of the ocean has sworn vengeance against him, and witches and sirens try to lure him off course, Odysseus is clever and has the brilliant goddess Athena on his side.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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