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Blindness by José Saramago
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Blindness (original 1995; edition 1999)

by José Saramago (Author)

Series: Blindness (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
11,430361446 (4.07)5 / 549
"A city is struck by an epidemic of "white blindness." Authorities confine the blind to a vacant mental hospital secured by armed guards under instructions to shoot anyone trying to escape. Inside, the criminal element among the blind holds everyone captive, stealing food rations and assaulting women. There is one eyewitness to this nightmare who guides seven strangers--among them a boy with no mother, a girl with dark glasses, a dog of tears--through the barren streets, and the procession becomes as uncanny as the surroundings are harrowing. A magnificent parable of loss and disorientation and a vivid evocation of the horrors of the twientieth century, Blindness is a powerful portrayal of man's worst appetites and weaknesses--and man's ultimately exhilarating spirit"--P. [4] of cover.… (more)
Member:Heidzzzzzzz
Title:Blindness
Authors:José Saramago (Author)
Info:Mariner books (1999), Edition: First, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Blindness by José Saramago (1995)

  1. 203
    The Road by Cormac McCarthy (browner56, ateolf, lilisin, petterw)
    browner56: Two harrowing, well-written looks at what we can expect when society breaks down
  2. 140
    The Plague by Albert Camus (amyblue, roby72)
  3. 60
    The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham (infiniteletters)
  4. 50
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding (petterw)
  5. 72
    Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (Simone2)
  6. 41
    José Saramago: A Consistência dos Sonhos - Cronobiografia by Fernando Gómez Aguilera (Ronoc)
  7. 10
    Death with Interruptions by José Saramago (Birbuv)
  8. 10
    High-Rise by J. G. Ballard (bertilak)
  9. 21
    In the Country of Last Things by Paul Auster (BenTreat, Vonini)
    BenTreat: Both books are personal, tragic accounts of the collapse of civil society.
    Vonini: Same surreal feel, absent government, feeling of people being left to their fates, creeping despair, dismantling of society.
  10. 10
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (petterw)
  11. 10
    State of Siege by Albert Camus (colagold)
  12. 00
    Into That Darkness by Steven Price (lkernagh)
  13. 11
    White Noise by Don DeLillo (chrisharpe)
  14. 12
    Rhinoceros by Eugène Ionesco (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Surreal epidemic spreads through the population.
1990s (22)
To Read (29)
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English (285)  Spanish (19)  Dutch (13)  Italian (10)  French (6)  Catalan (4)  Portuguese (Portugal) (4)  Swedish (4)  Portuguese (Brazil) (3)  German (3)  Portuguese (2)  Danish (2)  Hebrew (1)  Arabic (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (358)
Showing 1-5 of 285 (next | show all)
Very intriguing idea, and would be a horrifying condition to be in, but the book itself was a bit on the slow side. Definitely not the kind of pace that I like my post-apocalyptic stuff to run at. ( )
  KrakenTamer | Oct 23, 2021 |
Mind-blowing, not mindless. The way all thrillers should be. ( )
  Gadi_Cohen | Sep 22, 2021 |
A book that teaches us that being blind doesn't mean we are incapable of doing what we like. ( )
  _Marcia_94_ | Sep 21, 2021 |
A harsh book, not for the faint reader, but if you have can power your way through, you might find it illuminating. I did like the book, but recommending it is a hard sell. Take it up on your own accord. ( )
  LukeGoldstein | Aug 10, 2021 |
Hobbesian depravity reigns when everyone in an unnamed city mysteriously goes blind. A wonderfully dark premise by which to explore human behavior and psychology. Saramago knew only a woman left sighted would serve others, though it’s damning that her heroism manifests in servitude. I disliked the more contrived scenarios (e.g., blind women meekly accepting gang rape for food). The style mimicked disorienting blindness: this book is written in ~100 long, run-on sentences without standard punctuation to guide the reader. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 285 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Saramago, Joséprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Davis, JonathanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Desti, RitaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lemmens, HarrieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mertin, Ray-GüdeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pontiero, GiovanniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weissová, LadaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
If you can see, look.

If you can look, observe.

-- From the Book of Exhortations
Dedication
For Pilar
For my daughter Violante
First words
The amber light came on.
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"A city is struck by an epidemic of "white blindness." Authorities confine the blind to a vacant mental hospital secured by armed guards under instructions to shoot anyone trying to escape. Inside, the criminal element among the blind holds everyone captive, stealing food rations and assaulting women. There is one eyewitness to this nightmare who guides seven strangers--among them a boy with no mother, a girl with dark glasses, a dog of tears--through the barren streets, and the procession becomes as uncanny as the surroundings are harrowing. A magnificent parable of loss and disorientation and a vivid evocation of the horrors of the twientieth century, Blindness is a powerful portrayal of man's worst appetites and weaknesses--and man's ultimately exhilarating spirit"--P. [4] of cover.

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Average: (4.07)
0.5 4
1 46
1.5 7
2 142
2.5 36
3 455
3.5 146
4 1105
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