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A Continent Of Islands: Searching For The Caribbean Destiny

by Mark Kurlansky

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902256,525 (4.14)2
"A penetrating analysis of the social, political, sexual, and cultural worlds that exist behind the four-color Caribbean travel posters. . . . Page after page of highly original insights."--Kirkus Reviews In this richly detailed portrait of the individual countries and peoples of the Caribbean, Mark Kurlansky brings to life a society and culture often kept hidden from foreigners-the arts, history, politics, and economics of the region, as well as the vivid day-to-day lives of its citizens. From the Newyoriccans of Levittown, Puerto Rico; to the state-salaried popular musicians of Cuba; to the practitioners of good political hurricanemanship (who know how to stretch statistics to bring in relief funds), A Continent of Islands paints portraits that will prove equally fascinating to tourists who know the Caribbean only as a string of beach resorts, and to readers curious about U.S. efforts to influence its neighbors.… (more)
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If this were converted to a Facebook group it would be "You know you are Caribbean if....". I have visited 5 of the English island groups and a number of associated islands..Nevis, Barbuda...The author really has the customs, people, landscape down pat. Excellent ( )
  carterchristian1 | Nov 28, 2011 |
This is a vivid, compelling book that gets beyond platitudes about the Caribbean as a tourist paradise or a group of hopelessly backward, chronically underdeveloped nations. Kurlansky clearly loves the region and its people, but avoids romanticizing their struggles. He has an ability to find take a small event or character and embroider it into a much larger understanding of the complex story of the Caribbean. The book gives you an appreciation for both the enormity of the problems the Caribbean nations face, balanced by an appreciative admiration for the rich cultural legacies that have survived the the brutalities of colonial domination, and for the resourcefulness and courage of their peoples. On the whole, one comes away with a sense of modest optimism for the future. ( )
1 vote JFBallenger | Mar 27, 2011 |
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"A penetrating analysis of the social, political, sexual, and cultural worlds that exist behind the four-color Caribbean travel posters. . . . Page after page of highly original insights."--Kirkus Reviews In this richly detailed portrait of the individual countries and peoples of the Caribbean, Mark Kurlansky brings to life a society and culture often kept hidden from foreigners-the arts, history, politics, and economics of the region, as well as the vivid day-to-day lives of its citizens. From the Newyoriccans of Levittown, Puerto Rico; to the state-salaried popular musicians of Cuba; to the practitioners of good political hurricanemanship (who know how to stretch statistics to bring in relief funds), A Continent of Islands paints portraits that will prove equally fascinating to tourists who know the Caribbean only as a string of beach resorts, and to readers curious about U.S. efforts to influence its neighbors.

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