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Don't Waste Your Life (2003)

by John Piper

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4,427292,006 (4.03)19
Millions of people are wasting their lives pursuing dreams of happiness that don't rise above a good marriage, nice kids, a successful career, a nice car, fun vacations, nice friends, a fun retirement, a painless death, and (hopefully) no hell. John Piper calls this a tragedy in the making. He argues that we were created for joy. We were designed to have one life-encompassing passion. In this book he describes his own journey in discovering this great, single passion. And He pleads that at all costs we pursue our joy in the crucified Christ, who is the glory of God. The cost is great. But the joy is worth any cost. Don't buy seductive, tragic promises of worldly joy. Don't waste your life.… (more)
  1. 20
    The Gospel for Real Life: Turn to the Liberating Power of the Cross...Every Day (Now Includes Study Guide) by Jerry Bridges (soflbooks)
    soflbooks: Piper convinces us not to waste our life; Bridges shows us how. Both men have written many excellent books, but these two are my favorites.
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» See also 19 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
Since he was young, John Piper has been motivated by this idea of not wasting his life and time on earth - what has he been called here to do? In ten chapters, he explores the main purposes of a Christian: to glorify God by finding our joy in him, and to love others by making them glad in God.

I was really hoping I had a review from when I first read this book about eleven years ago, because it's hard to try to sum in for a review. Piper covers a lot of ground, and the first few chapters of this book were intellectually demanding and tough for my small group to take in. But in the end, he does get practical, using a lot of Scriptural support to talk about how we spend our time, money, what our witness should be like at work, and participating in missions. There's a lot here to challenge and convict, and we were glad we stuck with it. ( )
  bell7 | Dec 17, 2019 |
This book is part of my collection that really focuses in on Biblical Commentary more than anything else (including some well known authors in the theological world). All of these books haven't been read cover to cover, but I've spent a lot of time with them and they've been helpful in guiding me through difficult passages (or if I desire to dig deeper). ( )
  justagirlwithabook | Jul 31, 2018 |
Only Read Half
  CARay | Apr 25, 2018 |
I'm not a huge Piper fan which in some circles is tantamount to blasphemy. I don't agree with his Christian hedonism principle--it seems to me to be self-focused rather than God focused.

However, this book is a helpful reminder that our lives should be used for the glory of God. We are always on duty in His service and cannot afford to waste our time.

Recommended. ( )
  sparkleandchico | Jun 2, 2017 |
This is the first book of Piper's that I have read. In it, he works through what makes life worthwhile and rewarding. From the Christian perspective, there can only be one answer. "Man's chief end is to glorify God and to enjoy Him forever" (Westminster Shorter Catechism). Piper simply expounds this concept with example and explanation, considering the various ways in which one's life can be "wasted" if the focus is on pleasure or worldly success. I enjoyed the book, but I felt rather than developing new arguments, Piper tends to repeat similar ideas in different forms, esp. in the later parts of the book. An inspirational read, but not great logical apologetics. Still, theologically sound.
( )
  kaitanya64 | Jan 3, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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To Louie Giglio and the passion of his heart for the renown of Jesus Christ in this generation.
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For Christians and Non-Christians-- The Bible says, "You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body" (1 Corinthians 6:19-20). (Preface)
My father was an evangelist. In fact he still is, even though he doesn't travel now.
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Millions of people are wasting their lives pursuing dreams of happiness that don't rise above a good marriage, nice kids, a successful career, a nice car, fun vacations, nice friends, a fun retirement, a painless death, and (hopefully) no hell. John Piper calls this a tragedy in the making. He argues that we were created for joy. We were designed to have one life-encompassing passion. In this book he describes his own journey in discovering this great, single passion. And He pleads that at all costs we pursue our joy in the crucified Christ, who is the glory of God. The cost is great. But the joy is worth any cost. Don't buy seductive, tragic promises of worldly joy. Don't waste your life.

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John Piper writes, "I will tell you what a tragedy is. I will show you how to waste your life. Consider this story from the February 1998 Reader's Digest: A couple 'took early retirement from their jobs in the Northeast five years ago when he was 59 and she was 51. Now they live in Punta Gorda, Florida, where they cruise on their 30-foot trawler, play softball and collect shells. . . .' Picture them before Christ at the great day of judgment: 'Look, Lord. See my shells.' That is a tragedy.

"God created us to live with a single passion: to joyfully display his supreme excellence in all the spheres of life. The wasted life is the life without this passion. God calls us to pray and think and dream and plan and work not to be made much of, but to make much of him in every part of our lives."

This work is a passionate call for this generation to make their lives count for eternity. John Piper acknowledges that the risks for those who seek to accomplish something in life - risks in relationships for the sake of righteousness and authenticity, risks with money for the cause of the Gospel, and risks in witnessing to the truth and beauty of Christ. 

Readers will find their passion for the cross of Christ enlarged as a result of listening to this title.
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