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The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of…
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The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, and Related Tales

by Edgar Allan Poe

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I love Edgar Allan Poe that's why I'm giving his only novel 4 stars. If it was anyone else it would only be 3 but I'm prejudiced! ( )
  Iambookish | Dec 14, 2016 |
This is an amazing novel, and it is baffling that it isn't better known. I still can't believe Poe wrote it in 1838, as it would have seemed current in the 1950s Scifi era. The ending is rushed, and I wonder if Poe simply ran out of ideas. ( )
  kcshankd | Aug 27, 2015 |
Único romance escrito por Poe. Começa como uma aventura marítima convencional, em que os marinheiros devem enfrentar calmaria, motim e canibalismo, mas fica progressivamente mais estranho e misterioso, e termina de forma imprevisível. Seu modo macabro, quase esquivo, inspirou Baudelaire e Melville. ( )
  JuliaBoechat | Mar 30, 2013 |
I'm not sure I ought to even call this a review, since it's really more just some scattered thoughts on Edgar Allan Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Oxford World's Classics edition). It's a bizarre little novel, filled with strange incongruities, fantastic happenings, and an ending that baffles more than satisfies. Is this Poe at his best, skilfully limning the limits of narrative fiction and brilliantly parodying the travel narratives, hoax stories and unbelievable adventure tales of his day? Or is it him at his scattered, disorganized worst, tossing motifs in hither and yon in an attempt to make a short story into a longer work?

I have to say I'm not sure. I'm not sure Poe was sure, either, about what he wanted to do with this work. There's a little bit of everything here: spiritualism and deliverance, a bit of cryptography, perhaps some racial allegory, a splash of zoological and botanical exploration, cannibalism and hardship narrative, &c. &c. &c., all colored by the possibility that some of all of the narrative is entirely the product of Mr. Pym's imagination, and that the reader then and now ought to be careful.

I'm intrigued by the journey, and by Poe's inclusion of the search for the mysterious Aurora Islands in the story. It would make rather a cool Google Map to track the voyage, wouldn't it?

[Update: Decided it would make a nifty Google Map, so I mapped it].

http://philobiblos.blogspot.com/2009/11/book-review-narrative-of-arthur-gordon.h... ( )
  JBD1 | Nov 2, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0192837710, Paperback)

And now I found these fancies creating their own realities, and all imagined horrors crowding upon me in fact'. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym is an archetypal American story of escape from home and family which traces a young man's rite of passage through a series of terrible brushes with death during a fateful sea voyage. But it also goes much deeper, as Pym encounters various interpretative dilemmas, at last leaving the reader with a broken-off ending that defies solution. Apart from its violence and mystery, the tale calls attention to the act of writing and to the problem of representing truth. Layer upon layer of elaborate hoaxes include its author's own role of posing as ghost-writer of the narrative; Pym - his only novel - has become the key text for our understanding of Poe. This edition offers eight short tales which are linked to Pym by their treatment of persistent themes - fantastic voyages, gigantic whirlpools, and premature burials - or by their ironic commentary on Poe's mystification of his readers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:37 -0400)

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