HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Antigone by Jean Anouilh
Loading...

Antigone (edition 1991)

by Jean Anouilh (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,2841511,149 (3.93)26
'Anouilh is a poet, but not of words: he is a poet of words-acted, of scenes-set, of players-performing' Peter Brook Jean Anouilh, one of the foremost French playwrights of the twentieth century, replaced the mundane realist works of the previous era with his innovative dramas, which exploit fantasy, tragic passion, scenic poetry and cosmic leaps in time and space. Antigone, his best-known play, was performed in 1944 in Nazi-controlled Paris and provoked fierce controversy. In defying the tyrant Creon and going to her death, Antigone conveyed to Anouilh's compatriots a covert message of heroic resistance; but the author's characterisaation of Creon also seemed to exonerate Marshal Petain and his fellow collaborators. More ambivalent than his ancient model, Sophocles, Anouilh uses Greek myth to explore the disturbing moral dilemmas of our times. Commentary and notes by Ted Freeman.… (more)
Member:Rachel_Cucinella
Title:Antigone
Authors:Jean Anouilh (Author)
Info:Methuan Drama (1991)
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:to-read

Work details

Antigone by Jean Anouilh (Author)

  1. 20
    The Flies by Jean-Paul Sartre (raton-liseur)
    raton-liseur: Deux réécritures de mythes grecs, écrites dans le même contexte, celui de l'Occupation pendant la 2nde guerre mondiale. Liberté, choix, responsabilité sont les notions évoquées dans ces deux pièces marquantes.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 26 mentions

English (9)  German (2)  French (2)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (15)
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I’m so excited to finally be posting a mini review of one of my favourite french plays, Antigone! Antigone is a retelling of Sophocles’ Antigone from Ancient Greece, adapted by Jean Anouilh during World War II. While the play is close to eighty years old now, it fits the current trend of retelling ancient myths and examining classics from a modern perspective.

The play follows Antigone as she attempts to bury her dead brother even though it’s against the laws of her uncle’s authoritarian regime. As Antigone debates with her uncle the nature of happiness and freedom versus laws and order, the pair also explore the influence of nostalgia on memories from childhood. I loved the contrast between the idealism of youth and the reality of adulthood through the young character of Antigone, as well as the idea of destiny (Antigone’s father is the famed Oedipus, so she feels that she must follow in his footsteps.)

Antigone is a tragedy and despite knowing that all will not end well, Anouilh manages to suspend that to craft an amazing play. In my opinion, the play reads very well, and I don’t think you necessarily have to see it performed to appreciate the writing, though of course the adaption on Youtube I watched was equally amazing.

Rating 5/5: The play is a short and a simple read, the characters all incredibly written. If you ever have the chance to see Antigone in person (I wish I did!) I’d highly recommend it. If not, I’d recommend the read for anyone who is a fan of Madeline Miller or the musical Hadestown! ( )
  Reading.rock | Jan 14, 2021 |
Written and performed in Paris during the Occupation this play explores the tragedy of Antigone who defies her uncle's order to bury her brother, Polynices. Its exploration of themes such as loyalty, defiance, happiness, and adherence to the law are fascinating to consider in the context of when the play was originally produced. While the play is a bit heavy on long speeches, as is fitting to a classical tragedy, there are occasional moments of humour interwoven throughout as the play makes its way to its inevitable tragic end. ( )
  MickyFine | Jul 10, 2020 |
Inspired by current events I went back to read classics from an earlier Resistance that I first encountered in a university French class. The title character remains a compelling one, both staunch and uncertain, a little lost and wholly driven. (Re)discovering that Anouilh is pushing the whole existentialist idea of the Absurd, in which her sacrifice is meaningless even at last to her (and that there is perhaps an integrity in that meaningless choice, but no vindication of righteousness), feels like a betrayal. ( )
  zeborah | Jan 1, 2018 |
I read this book in secondary school for French...
There are still several fragments I know by heart :-)

"C'est vrai, c'était encore la nuit. Et il n'y avait que moi dans toute la campagne à penser que c'était le matin. C'est merveilleux, nourrice. J'ai cru au jour la première aujourd'hui."

And I could read it over and over again...

( )
  AnneTanne | Jun 19, 2016 |
{the following review is not for this edition but for the 2 editions borrowed from the library in 2016}
Excellent full cast recording in the L.A. TheaterWorks audiobook and the translation by Christopher Nixon was also very good.

Luckily for me I got the audiobook as when I turned to the print edition I had checked out from the library, it turned out to be in French!! My French isn't good enough to have read this alone but was good enough to attempt reading it with the help of an English translation in audio :) It was an interesting experience! The L.A. TheatreWorks audiobook doesn't include stage directions so I would pause momentarily while I read these.

One thing that I noticed is that while Creon talks to Antigone in the familiar (tu), she responds to him in the formal (vous). This difference gives a spin to their relationship which cannot easily be duplicated in English.

Reading this knowing that it was written & first performed in Vichy France gives certain phrases and actions a special significance. However, even without that Anouilh's version of this story had some interesting twists to Sophocles' original. Creon is a more ambivalent character; he seems more reasonable, more caring and less stubborn than the one in either the Sophocles or Heaney versions. Antigone's relationships with Haemon (Creon's son) and her sister Ismene are both expanded but her motivation for her actions in this version is much more murky. By lessening the contrast between the 2 characters you would expect that the tension would be less but Anouilh manages to make their confrontation even more heartbreaking as it has overtones of a family feud (and of course, if you read into it Creon as the French colloborator acting for the Nazis and Antigone as the Resistance fighter, then the drama is heightened even further). ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 8, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anouilh, JeanAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bray, BarbaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fragnol, LaurencePhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Galantiere, LewisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meier, DieterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Le Prologue: Voilà. Ces personnages vont vous jouer l'histoire d'Antigone.
Quotations
Last words
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

'Anouilh is a poet, but not of words: he is a poet of words-acted, of scenes-set, of players-performing' Peter Brook Jean Anouilh, one of the foremost French playwrights of the twentieth century, replaced the mundane realist works of the previous era with his innovative dramas, which exploit fantasy, tragic passion, scenic poetry and cosmic leaps in time and space. Antigone, his best-known play, was performed in 1944 in Nazi-controlled Paris and provoked fierce controversy. In defying the tyrant Creon and going to her death, Antigone conveyed to Anouilh's compatriots a covert message of heroic resistance; but the author's characterisaation of Creon also seemed to exonerate Marshal Petain and his fellow collaborators. More ambivalent than his ancient model, Sophocles, Anouilh uses Greek myth to explore the disturbing moral dilemmas of our times. Commentary and notes by Ted Freeman.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 18
2.5 6
3 53
3.5 7
4 81
4.5 12
5 85

GenreThing

No genres

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,290,270 books! | Top bar: Always visible