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Intimate Journals (1887)

by Charles Baudelaire

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2211101,484 (3.85)5
Dismissed as a vulgar drug addict who wrote about sex and death, Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) went largely unrecognized until the 20th century. This collection of the notorious poet's essays transcends the squalor of his financial ruin and the torture of physical decline to offer compelling thoughts on his world, society, and philosophy.… (more)
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» See also 5 mentions

I am unable to comprehend how a man of honor could take a newspaper in his hands without a shudder of disgust.

The preface and introduction by Isherwood and Auden allowed me to round up. I completed the text after discovering we had been burglarized and before going to a funeral. How's that for a Thursday in spring? I should sigh now and shut my fucking mouth. There was no catastrophe. Evidently the housebreakers harbored no literary interest. I recovered a portion of my stolen clothing (!!!) in a copse of woods across the way. Auden spends a fair amount of time parsing the concept of the heroic as it changes from Homer to Plato and onto the Christian tradition. This notebook while hardly intimate does reveal a germ of contemplation upon a heroic life in 19C Europe.

The pained aspects of the journal involve Baudelaire's need for sobriety and income. There is an ache in that almost serial sentiment. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (26 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles Baudelaireprimary authorall editionscalculated
Auden, W. H.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eliot, T. S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Isherwood, ChristopherTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dismissed as a vulgar drug addict who wrote about sex and death, Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) went largely unrecognized until the 20th century. This collection of the notorious poet's essays transcends the squalor of his financial ruin and the torture of physical decline to offer compelling thoughts on his world, society, and philosophy.

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