HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Serpent on the Crown

by Elizabeth Peters

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3432210,386 (3.96)34
It's 1922, and The Great War is over. With the world at peace, Amelia and her family return to the Valley of the Kings to explore its storied sands. But they are quickly troubled by treacherous secrets and murder. A woman presents them with a priceless but dangerous artifact--a golden king said to bring death to all who possess it. The woman's husband has already fallen, and now she needs help to return the relixc to its tomb.… (more)
Recently added byMelinaAnderson71, RejoiceEvermore, Erina42, private library, syzygydigic, LadyDita
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 34 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Synopsis: 'The Emersons have returned to the Valley of the Kings in 1922 and Amelia Peabody and her family look forward to delving once more into the age-old mysteries buried in Egypt's ever-shifting sands. But a widow's strange story -- and even stranger request -- is about to plunge them into a storm of secrets, treachery, and murder.
The woman, a well-known author, has come bearing an ill-gotten treasure -- a golden likeness of a forgotten king -- which she claims is cursed. She insists it has taken the life of her husband and unless it is returned to the tomb from which it was stolen, more people will die.
Amelia and her clan resolve to uncover the secrets of the statue's origins, setting off on a trail that twists and turns in directions they never anticipated -- and, perhaps, toward an old nemesis with unscrupulous new designs. But each step toward the truth seems to reveal another peril, suggesting to the intrepid Amelia that the curse is more than mere superstition. And its next victim might well be a beloved family member ... or Amelia Peabody herself.'
Review: Whew! I thought that Amelia was a goner and this was the end of the series. ( )
  DrLed | May 14, 2021 |
It's 1922 and the Emerson family has returned to the Valley of the Kings. Before they can even get settled back into their daily life, a widow implores Emerson to accept a small golden statue, which she claims carries a curse that killed her husband, a collector of antiquities. Shortly thereafter the woman disappears and several attempts to steal the statue are attempted. Everyone claims the kidnapping was done by a black afrit, which is a bad spirit. Before long a body is discovered and the Peabody/Emerson household is back in the murder solving business.

The story is nicely played out and several plots are woven together for complexity. Peabody’s Victorian rhetoric can go over the top but the author injects plenty of humorous banter, lots of bluster from Emerson, and enough swipes at Victorian propriety to keep the story lively. Veteran narrator Barbara Rosenblat doesn't miss any of the sly humor that readers/listeners have come to expect in the series. Ms. Rosenblat successfully inhabits diverse characters and presents distinctive voices that will entertain and amuse.

If you are a fan of the series you will enjoy this seventeenth book. I don't know if I would enjoy nearly as much if I was just reading it. I can't imagine a better narrator than Barbara Rosenblat who nails each one of the characters, book after book. ( )
  Olivermagnus | Jul 2, 2020 |
I've read the whole series and have enjoyed them for an entertaining fast read. Unfortunately, this one fell flat. A friend loaned me the next one in the series so I'll give it a try and hope it's back to the level of the earlier books. ( )
  tkcs | Feb 23, 2019 |
It's 1922 and the Emerson family has returned to the Valley of the Kings. Before they can even get settled back into their daily life, a widow implores Emerson to accept a small golden statue, which she claims carries a curse that killed her husband, a collector of antiquities. Shortly thereafter the woman disappears and several attempts to steal the statue are attempted. Everyone claims the kidnapping was done by a black afrit, which is a bad spirit. Before long a body is discovered and the Peabody/Emerson household is back in the murder solving business.

The story is nicely played out and several plots are woven together for complexity. Peabody’s Victorian rhetoric can go over the top but the author injects plenty of humorous banter, lots of bluster from Emerson, and enough swipes at Victorian propriety to keep the story lively. Veteran narrator Barbara Rosenblat doesn't miss any of the sly humor that readers/listeners have come to expect in the series. Ms. Rosenblat successfully inhabits diverse characters and presents distinctive voices that will entertain and amuse.

If you are a fan of the series you will enjoy this seventeenth book. I don't know if I would enjoy nearly as much if I was just reading it. I can't imagine a better narrator than Barbara Rosenblat who nails each one of the characters, book after book.
( )
  Olivermagnus | Jan 17, 2016 |
Serpent On The Crown, by Elizabeth Peters
★★★★ (★★★★★ and a ♥)

Synopsis: A priceless relic has been delivered to the Emerson home overlooking the Nile. But more than history surrounds this golden likeness of a forgotten king, for it is said early death will befall anyone who possesses it. The woman who implores the renowned family of archaeologists and adventurers to accept the cursed statue insists the ill-gotten treasure has already killed her husband. Further, she warns, unless it is returned to the tomb from which it was stolen, more will surely die. With the world finally at peace—and with Egypt's ancient mysteries opened to them once more—Amelia Peabody and her loved ones are plunged into a storm of secrets, treachery, and murder by a widow's strange story and even stranger request. Each step toward the truth reveals a new peril, suggesting this curse is no mere superstition. And the next victim of the small golden king could be any member of the close-knit clan—perhaps even Amelia herself.
In A Sentence: better than I previously remembered, but I still think the series starts to go downhill after book #12, and this is book #17.
My Thoughts: After a while, all the different things that happen to Amelia and her family just start to blend together. Even though I finished this yesterday, I can barely remember what happened at the beginning of the novel. When they discussed the facts of the case at the end of the story, my first immediate thought was, “wait, there was a boat involved? Huh?”
Despite my lapses in memory, I still enjoyed the read. For some reason I didn’t like this novel the last time I read this. So maybe the lowered expectations allowed me to enjoy it more this time around. The plot was interesting, with multiple things happening at once. The humor is still there, although it hasn’t changed much since the first novel. And Ramses is still my favorite.
I am looking forward to the end of this series. There are two books left, and I want to re-read Lord Of The Silent eventually (reading the abridged version ruined it!). So here we go! 17 down, 2 more to go!
( )
  Spirolim | Jan 13, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Elizabeth Petersprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rosenbalt, BarbaraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Salima Ikram
First words
He woke from a feverish sleep to see something bending over him.
Quotations
I have robbed their nostrils of the breath of life
And made the dead of you fill their hearts
My serpent on your brow consumed them

-The Poetical Stela of Thutmose III
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

It's 1922, and The Great War is over. With the world at peace, Amelia and her family return to the Valley of the Kings to explore its storied sands. But they are quickly troubled by treacherous secrets and murder. A woman presents them with a priceless but dangerous artifact--a golden king said to bring death to all who possess it. The woman's husband has already fallen, and now she needs help to return the relixc to its tomb.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1 4
1.5 1
2 8
2.5 2
3 42
3.5 10
4 125
4.5 4
5 69

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 158,843,932 books! | Top bar: Always visible