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Fog: A Novel (Northwestern World Classics)…
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Fog: A Novel (Northwestern World Classics) (original 1914; edition 2017)

by Miguel de Unamuno (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0692115,731 (4.06)42
The three remarkable pieces of fiction included in this volume are not so much novelets, novels, as nivolas, a form invented by Unamuno. Originally published in 1976. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.… (more)
Member:Crooper
Title:Fog: A Novel (Northwestern World Classics)
Authors:Miguel de Unamuno (Author)
Info:Northwestern University Press (2017), 188 pages
Collections:Your library
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Work Information

Mist by Miguel de Unamuno (1914)

  1. 10
    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge by George Berkeley (Sergio88)
  2. 00
    Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Books in which the author appears as himself and interacts with the characters while manipulating their fates.
  3. 00
    Jacques the Fatalist by Denis Diderot (thorold)
    thorold: Although the philosophical ideas discussed are rather different, Diderot and Unamuno have a lot of common ground in the random, discursive way they tell the story.
  4. 00
    Insatiability by Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (Neurasthenio)
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» See also 42 mentions

English (12)  Spanish (7)  Catalan (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
8472916774
  archivomorero | Jun 25, 2022 |
848966935X
  archivomorero | Jun 25, 2022 |
Acaso no somos todos el sueño de un Dios indiferente? ( )
  MissAlandra | Jan 17, 2022 |
In his introduction to this English edition of Miguel de Unamuno’s Niebla (“Mist” or, as in [a:Elena Barcia|15816815|Elena Barcia|https://s.gr-assets.com/assets/nophoto/user/u_50x66-632230dc9882b4352d753eedf9396530.png]’s new translation – “Fog”), [a:Alberto Manguel|3602|Alberto Manguel|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1227041892p2/3602.jpg] makes a bold claim for the novel. Critics, he tells us, have almost unanimously placed it amongst the great Modernist texts, next to Virginia Woolf’s The Waves and Pirandello’s [b:Sei personaggi in cerca d'autore|11483158|Sei personaggi in cerca d'autore|Luigi Pirandello|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1374151596s/11483158.jpg|15468851]. Except that Unamuno’s novel precedes them both, having been published in 1914 and commenced years before.

Now I have a confession to make. Although a fan of Italian literature, I have never read [a:Luigi Pirandello|7702|Luigi Pirandello|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1464208347p2/7702.jpg], mainly because I have always been afraid that my tastes are too traditional to appreciate this experimental master. As for [b:The Waves|46114|The Waves|Virginia Woolf|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1439492320s/46114.jpg|6057263] – I did read the novel over twenty years ago, but that was only because it was lent to me by a girl I fancied. And if the rocker Meat Loaf sang that he “would do anything for Love”, I guessed that having a go at Woolf was no big deal. Alas, The Waves washed over me without leaving any long-lasting ripples and I’ve never felt any inclination to tackle Woolf since then. It was therefore with some trepidation that I approached Unamuno’s book. I needn’t have worried, as the novel turned out to be really fun to read. And by “fun” I do not simply mean that it is “interesting” and “intellectually satisfying” (although it is that is well) but it is also seriously entertaining.

As in any self-respecting Modernist novel, the plot is secondary, if not inexistent. Bored bachelor Augusto Pérez has lost his doting mother who, before passing on, insists that he find himself a wife. It takes the gaze of piano-teacher Eugenia to finally awake Augusto’s passions. There is a problem though - the wilful Eugenia is not particularly drawn to Augusto. Apart from the fact that she already has a fiancé. Moreover, thanks to Eugenia, Augusto’s eyes are finally open to the charms of women in general, and the ones who surround him in particular. Meaning that he is soon embroiled in a nascent affair with the earthier Rosario, the young woman who does his laundry. In between Augusto’s hapless attempts at lovemaking, he indulges in philosophical discussions and meta-fictional discourses with the other characters, which culminate in a showdown with the Author himself. Add a prologue purportedly written by one of Unamuno’s fictional characters, a “postprologue” by the author, and an epilogue by Augusto’s dog, and you have the makings of a Modernist text, a work which challenges preconceptions about the role of the author, his characters and his readers.

What is surprising is that even at his most abstruse, Unamuno retains a light and comic touch. Indeed, when not exploding novelistic conventions to smithereens, he indulges in a type of comedy which reminds me of early [a:Evelyn Waugh|11315|Evelyn Waugh|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1357463949p2/11315.jpg]. I particularly enjoyed the scenes involving Eugenia’s uncle - a self-declared “theoretical, mystical anarchist” who believes that Esperanto will bring about world peace.

I sincerely hope that Elena Barcia’s translation will bring this novel to the attention of a wider English-speaking (and reading) public. It deserves to be known not only for its literary-historical merits, but also – and perhaps more importantly – because it is such a great read. ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Jan 1, 2022 |
No novela, sino nivola, magnífica, que se adentra en lo experimental con resultados asombrosos. El protagonista de la novela, Augusto Pérez, se enfrenta al autor, físicamente, yendo al despacho que éste (Unamuno) tiene, por no estar contento con el destino que le ha hecho correr. Asimismo, el libro da una idea de la visión que Unamuno tenía de Dios: podía llegar a nuestras vidas en el momento que deseara, a la página que Él quisiera, y reescribir el futuro, que para nosotros era inevitable recorrer. Fantástica. ( )
  Remocpi | Apr 22, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (38 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Miguel de Unamunoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barcia, ElenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cruz, JuanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manguel, AlbertoIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valdez, Mario J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Al aparecer Augusto a la puerta de su casa extendió el brazo derecho, con la mano palma abajo y abierta, y dirigiendo los ojos al cielo quedóse un momento parado en esta actitud estatuaria y augusta. No era que tomaba posesión del mundo exterior, sino que observaba si llovía.
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Sólo se aprende a vivir viviendo, y cada hombre tiene que recomenzar el aprendizaje de la vida de nuevo.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The three remarkable pieces of fiction included in this volume are not so much novelets, novels, as nivolas, a form invented by Unamuno. Originally published in 1976. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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