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Star Trek: The Motion Picture by Gene…
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Star Trek: The Motion Picture (edition 2019)

by Gene Roddenberry (Author)

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1,0151214,423 (3.15)7
Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Star Trek: The Motion Picture with this classic movie novelization written by legendary Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry! The original five-year mission of the Starship Enterprise to explore strange new worlds and to seek out new life and new civilizations has ended. Now James T. Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy, and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise have separated to follow their own career paths and different lives. But now, an overwhelming alien threat--one that is ignoring all attempts at communication and annihilating all opposition in its path--is on a collision course with Earth, the very heart of the United Federation of Planets. And the only vessel that Starfleet can send in time to intercept this menace is a refitted Enterprise, with her old crew heeding the call to once again boldly go where no one has gone before....… (more)
Member:Marytudor
Title:Star Trek: The Motion Picture
Authors:Gene Roddenberry (Author)
Info:Simon & Schuster Audio (2019)
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Star Trek: The Motion Picture by Gene RODDENBERRY (Author)

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English (11)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (12)
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Gene Roddenberry is not a good writer of prose. Consequently the story of the movie, which might have been better stripped of the absurdly long effects sequences, gets marred again by Gene's clunky prose. Also, as a piece of advice to all novel writers, unless your novel is tongue in cheek and self-aware, don't use footnotes. ( )
  Count_Zero | Jul 7, 2020 |
Have you seen the first Star Trek film? It's great, isn't it? Except for the bit with Spock and Uhura in the turbolift. That was just weird. I especially liked the bit with Sulu and the swords and—

Hmm? What's that? That was actually the eleventh Star Trek film? Now you mention it, I do recall some earlier ones. There was that one with the Borg, right? That one was fantastic. And before that they kind of alternated between being not-so-good and being not-so-bad. All the way back to Wrath of Khan, yeah that was a good one. And before that? It's weird, I know there was a film before that but it's like I've repressed it. Maybe if I concentrate…

Agh! Oh God! My eyes! They're bleeding! Well alright, maybe the first Star Trek film wasn't so bad that my retinas spontaneously exploded, but it was close. I think I first saw it when I was only eight or nine, and kind of liked it. I've always had a soft spot for ridiculously big objects in science fiction, and I was into astronomy at the time. These two things combine in the film's antagonist, the enigmatic V'ger. So imagine my disappointment (in the film and my younger self) when I sat down a few years later and discovered that Star Trek: The Motion Picture is in fact two hours of laborious drivel.

The book, on the other hand, is pretty good. It's a second version of the novelisation of the film. It's main conceit is the suggestion that the first novelisation, and by extension the movie itself, is the “official” version of events, and this novel is what really happened, courtesy of James T. Kirk. Mayhap that's Gene Roddenberry's way of saying he didn't like the final version of the film but was powerless against the studio that funded it, so offered this as his cut of the film. Or mayhap not. Some of the flaws of the film are still there, and not all of the new subplots are worthwhile additions to the story. But enough of them add something positive to the mixture to make a minor success of a book out a major travesty of a film. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Have you seen the first Star Trek film? It's great, isn't it? Except for the bit with Spock and Uhura in the turbolift. That was just weird. I especially liked the bit with Sulu and the swords and—

Hmm? What's that? That was actually the eleventh Star Trek film? Now you mention it, I do recall some earlier ones. There was that one with the Borg, right? That one was fantastic. And before that they kind of alternated between being not-so-good and being not-so-bad. All the way back to Wrath of Khan, yeah that was a good one. And before that? It's weird, I know there was a film before that but it's like I've repressed it. Maybe if I concentrate…

Agh! Oh God! My eyes! They're bleeding! Well alright, maybe the first Star Trek film wasn't so bad that my retinas spontaneously exploded, but it was close. I think I first saw it when I was only eight or nine, and kind of liked it. I've always had a soft spot for ridiculously big objects in science fiction, and I was into astronomy at the time. These two things combine in the film's antagonist, the enigmatic V'ger. So imagine my disappointment (in the film and my younger self) when I sat down a few years later and discovered that Star Trek: The Motion Picture is in fact two hours of laborious drivel.

The book, on the other hand, is pretty good. It's a second version of the novelisation of the film. It's main conceit is the suggestion that the first novelisation, and by extension the movie itself, is the “official” version of events, and this novel is what really happened, courtesy of James T. Kirk. Mayhap that's Gene Roddenberry's way of saying he didn't like the final version of the film but was powerless against the studio that funded it, so offered this as his cut of the film. Or mayhap not. Some of the flaws of the film are still there, and not all of the new subplots are worthwhile additions to the story. But enough of them add something positive to the mixture to make a minor success of a book out a major travesty of a film. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
Like many have said before me: This is one of those rare times where the novellization is better than the film. In fact, I'd go as far to say that this is the best Star Trek tale ever told. It captures everything I love about science fiction while also expanding upon characters I've grown to love over many years.

Roddenberry's genius vividly comes to fruition in this tale as well. [ One small thing I noticed that I greatly enjoyed was the shift in perspective that happened when the novel discussed V-GER. Characters went from people, to carbon lifeforms, to units, and then finally to "it". This really captured the entire perspective of what was going on.

Overall well worth the read to any Star Trek fan or general science fiction lover. ( )
  DylanWolters | Dec 18, 2018 |
I went for the book of the film after reading terrible reviews of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, only to find that Roddenberry has translated perfectly into prose the out of character tedium of the big screen experience. Kirk is having a mid-life crisis, Bones and Spock have to be practically forced back on board the pimped-up Enterprise, and there is some golden-haired pretender (son of Commodore 'Ahab' Decker, no less, the one who went bonkers and fired himself into the doomsday machine) already installed in the captain's chair. At least I was spared the figure-hugging, neutral-tone uniforms. And the plot was a strange mish-mash of two episodes from the original series - Obsession and The Changeling. Someone should have reminded Gene that you can never go home again, even when recycling old plots: the magic of the series is missing from the 'motion picture', and nobody cares about the new crew members. (Saying that, I have downloaded The Search for Spock, just in case!)

What really baited me into buying the novelisation was this quote, however - Jim! Goodbye, my ... my t'hy'la! - and the supporting footnotes about the nature of Spock and Kirk's relationship, from Roddenberry himself. The promise of some weighty introspection is not followed through, though, barring those words from Spock and the sickbay scene, where Spock finally comes around and clasps Kirk's hand. So overall a forgettable translation of the film from 'the Creator' himself. ( )
  AdonisGuilfoyle | Apr 26, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
RODDENBERRY, GeneAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
FOSTER, Alan DeanStorysecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Foster, Alan DeanStory bysecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Livingston, HaroldScreenplay bysecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
LIVINGSTON, HaroldScreenplaysecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
PEAK, Robert M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Peak, Robert M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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My name is James Tiberius Kirk. (Preface)
He felt a strange tingling coming from somewhere inside his head.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This is the novelization of the film STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE, not the film itself.
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Wikipedia in English (4)

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Star Trek: The Motion Picture with this classic movie novelization written by legendary Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry! The original five-year mission of the Starship Enterprise to explore strange new worlds and to seek out new life and new civilizations has ended. Now James T. Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy, and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise have separated to follow their own career paths and different lives. But now, an overwhelming alien threat--one that is ignoring all attempts at communication and annihilating all opposition in its path--is on a collision course with Earth, the very heart of the United Federation of Planets. And the only vessel that Starfleet can send in time to intercept this menace is a refitted Enterprise, with her old crew heeding the call to once again boldly go where no one has gone before....

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The writer-producer who created Mr.Spock and all the other Star Trek characters--who invented the Starship Enterprise, who gave the show its look, its ideals--puts it all together again here in his first Star Trek novel!

Their historic 5-year mission is over. Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty, all the crew have scattered to other jobs or other lives. Now, they are back together again on a fabulously refitted U.S.S. Enterprise as an incredibly destructive POWER threatens earth and the human race.
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