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The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
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The Catcher in the Rye (edition 2001)

by J. D. Salinger (Author)

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62,56499714 (3.8)3 / 1070
In an effort to escape the hypocrisies of life at his boarding school, sixteen-year-old Holden Caulfield seeks refuge in New York City. "The hero-narrator of 'The Catcher in the Rye' is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices -- but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep"--Jacket.… (more)
Member:becca.helme
Title:The Catcher in the Rye
Authors:J. D. Salinger (Author)
Info:Bay Back Books (2001), Edition: 1, 288 pages
Collections:Read, Your library
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The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (Author)

1950s (10)
Read (34)
Cooper (17)
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Publicado originalmente: El Extraño Gato del Cuento

Ahora que estuve buscando algunos datos del libro, es muy gracioso ver como hay gente que ama u odio a muerte este libro. Confieso que pensé que no me iba a gustar, no tanto por el tema del libro, es más por una cosa muy superficial: algunas personas a las que le doy la contra en los gustos, les gustó el libro, deduje que como a ellos les gustó yo lo odiaría. Pero obviamente no fue así.

Es sencillo: o te identificas o no te identificas.

Esa es una de las frases que más he leído en varias reseñas. Y es muy cierto. Holden es incorrecto, es la mente propia de un cínico al descubierto, sin hipocresías. Todo eso en su mente por supuesto. Es cruel, burlón, malcriado, bastante antipático a veces. Es la mente de una persona horrible al descubierto. Me sentí completamente identificada.

.Todos los que lloran como cosacos con esa imbecilidad de película suelen ser luego unos cabrones de mucho cuidado.
Si siguen a Isaac Marion (Warm Bodies) en Twitter, habrán leído sus tweets ácidos y medios pesados. El Guardián Entre el Centeno es como la cuenta de Twitter de Isaac pero en libro. Toda la vida nos han enseñado a que debemos ser buenas personas, que no debemos pensar mal de las personas y blah blah, para mí leer un libro como éste ha sido tranquilizador. En cierta forma, porque como da a entender Holden, él no está exactamente lo que se puede decir bien.

Siempre he sabido terminaré en un "casa de reposo". Y que soy demasiado masculina para ser normal.

Se supone que este es un libro dónde la mayoría de chicos se siente cómodos al leerlo, porque capta bastante la mente masculina pero todo lo que leía en el libro, no me hacía más que asentir a su cinismo y lo imbécil que puede ser Holden. Y como leí por ahí, leer El Guardián Entre el Centeno es como leer la mente de un psicópata. Aunque Holden esté bastante mal de la cabeza, quiero tener la esperanza que mi cabeza no está tan mal, que mi locura es talento y que solo me falta descubrir en qué. Sí...

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  Ella_Zegarra | Jan 18, 2022 |
A masterpiece in the "coming of age" genre of novels, 'The Catcher in the Rye' follows Holden Caulfield as he wanders New York City (and life itself) fighting the transition from childhood to adulthood, as well as himself, while particularly fearing (perhaps semi-subconsciously) that in crossing over into adulthood, he'll become just like most of the adults he interacts with: a phony.

To the uninitiated: do NOT read this for the plot in and of itself; read it for narrator! The story is not the story; Holden Caulfield is the story. ( )
  djlinick | Jan 15, 2022 |
Never read this book as a freshman in high school. Made me apathetic and the person I am today...thank you J.D. I love you madly. ( )
  ennuiprayer | Jan 14, 2022 |
فکر می کنم این کتاب رو اگه اواخر نوجوانی خونده بودم، بیشتر خوشم میومد.
هولدن یک نوجوون ۱۶ ساله است که از عالم و آدم بیزاره:))) هنوز خودش رو درگیر پیچیدگی های رایج جامعه نکرده و نسبت به این مسائل و هنجارها دید انتقادی داره.
شاید بشه گفت سلینجر به نوعی سبک زندگی اون زمان [و حتی امروز] رو از زبان ساده و بی آلایش یک نوجوان مورد انتقاد قرار می ده.
ترجمه خوب بود، گرچه فکر می کنم حق مطلب رو به بهترین شکل ادا نمی کرد و کار سلطان زاده هم بسیار عالی و متناسب شخصیت ها بود. ( )
  Milad_Gharebaghi | Jan 14, 2022 |
Various friends have postulated that you have to read this book before you reach a certain age/maturity. I think I missed that cut-off, because I couldn't see much worth in this novel. Perhaps it was more revolutionary in its time. I found it boring. ( )
  stevepilsner | Jan 3, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 931 (next | show all)
“Holden Caulfield is supposed to be this paradigmatic teenager we can all relate to, but we don’t really speak this way or talk about these things,” Ms. Levenson said, summarizing a typical response. At the public charter school where she used to teach, she said, “I had a lot of students comment, ‘I can’t really feel bad for this rich kid with a weekend free in New York City.’ ”
 
"Some of my best friends are children," says Jerome David Salinger, 32. "In fact, all of my best friends are children." And Salinger has written short stories about his best friends with love, brilliance and 20-20 vision. In his tough-tender first novel, The Catcher in the Rye (a Book-of-the-Month Club midsummer choice), he charts the miseries and ecstasies of an adolescent rebel, and deals out some of the most acidly humorous deadpan satire since the late great Ring Lardner.
added by Shortride | editTime (Jul 16, 1951)
 
Holden's story is told in Holden's own strange, wonderful language by J. D. Salinger in an unusually brilliant novel.
 
This Salinger, he's a short story guy. And he knows how to write about kids. This book though, it's too long. Gets kind of monotonous. And he should've cut out a lot about these jerks and all at that crumby school. They depress me.
 

» Add other authors (77 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Salinger, J. D.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Avati, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Östergren, KlasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fonalleras, Josep MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Judit, GyepesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, MichaelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riera, ErnestTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Saarikoski, PenttiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schönfeld, EikeÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schroderus, ArtoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schuchart, MaxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zhongxu, SunTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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"If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want the truth."
Quotations
I'm quite illiterate but I read a lot.
You don’t have to think too hard when you talk to teachers.
I do not even like ... cars... I’d rather have a goddamn horse. A horse is at least human, for God’s sake.”
I always pick a gorgeous time to fall over a suitcase or something.
The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody'd move.... Nobody'd be different. The only thing that would be different would be you.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In an effort to escape the hypocrisies of life at his boarding school, sixteen-year-old Holden Caulfield seeks refuge in New York City. "The hero-narrator of 'The Catcher in the Rye' is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices -- but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep"--Jacket.

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Book description
The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days. The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it. There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices, underground voices-but Holden's voice is the most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader who can handle it to keep.

J.D. Salinger's classic novel of teenage angst and rebellion was first published in 1951. The novel was included on Time's 2005 list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923. It was named by Modern Library and its readers as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. It has been frequently challenged in the court for its liberal use of profanity and portrayal of sexuality and in the 1950's and 60's it was the novel that every teenage boy wants to read.
Haiku summary
Boy in funny hat
Wanders around N.Y.C.
Phonies everywhere.
(Christopher451)
A quoi bon la vie. Ses chemins nous mènent au trou. Attrape mon coeur!
Bottle up your grief.
Men do not have emotions.
Lie until you die.
(alsocass)

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Hachette Book Group

3 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0316769487, 0316769177, 0316769533

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014023750X, 0241950430

 

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