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Scattered poems by Jack Kerouac
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Scattered poems (edition 1971)

by Jack Kerouac

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353447,831 (3.64)3
Just as he upended the conventions of the novel with On the Road, Jack Kerouac revolutionized American poetry in this ingenious collection Bringing together selections from literary journals and his private notebooks, Jack Kerouac's Scattered Poems exemplifies the Beat Generation icon's innovative approach to language. Kerouac's poems, populated by hitchhikers, Chinese grocers, Buddhist saints, and cultural figures from Rimbaud to Harpo Marx, evoke the primal and the sublime, the everyday and the metaphysical. Scattered Poems, which includes the playfully instructive "How to Meditate," the sensory "San Francisco Blues," and an ode to Kerouac's fellow Beat Allen Ginsberg, is rich in striking images and strident urgency. Kerouac's widespread influences feel new and fresh in these poems, which echo the rhythm of improvisational jazz music, and the centuries-old structure of Japanese haiku. In rebelling against the dry rules and literary pretentiousness he perceived in early twentieth-century poetry, Kerouac pioneered a poetic style informed by oral tradition, driven by concrete language with neither embellishment nor abstraction, and expressed through spontaneous, uncensored writing.… (more)
Member:fosku
Title:Scattered poems
Authors:Jack Kerouac
Info:[San Francisco] : City Lights Books, [1971]
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:poetry, beat

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Scattered Poems (City Lights Pocket Poets Series) by Jack Kerouac

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Showing 4 of 4
I'm down for anything Kerouac, so this little book of random pieces from other publications and journals is a nice collection to read now and again.

I picked this one up from the small local bookstore in Emerald Isle one summer and keep it near at hand.

Best part for me is the poem for Harpo Marx and the collection of Western Haiku (including Kerouac's explanation of traditional haiku and the difference in writing a western haiku). Good stuff. ( )
  regularguy5mb | Jan 28, 2015 |
More interesting from a historical perspective than from a literary one. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 21, 2014 |
I like the haiku in this one, but mostly I like this book for the memories it brings back of traveling with my love. ( )
  elissajanine | Jun 14, 2009 |
A collection of B-Sides if you will.

When a writer dies young their lesser known work seems to grow in stature as audiences become hungry for new material. Kerouac has become a cottage industry for his estate; cashing in even the most obscure manuscripts and reprints with great fanfare.

One of the issues with complication such as Scattered Poems is that the quality is very touch and go. The opening salvo is a poem that evolved as Neal Cassidy, Kerouac, and Allen Ginsberg passed it back and forth. While there are a lot of diamonds in this collection, there are far too many pieces of coal.

Drawn from a various publications, journals, letters, and the whole span of Kerouac’s output you get to see the whole of his development as a writer. Kerouac was a poet for modern America, and this book doesn’t quite capture that feeling. Mexico City Blues or Book of Blues is the two places to start with Kerouac's Poetry. This is best left to hardcore fans.

http://pissandvinegar.vox.com/library/post/scattered-poems-by-jack-kerouac.html ( )
  finalbroadcast | Aug 10, 2007 |
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Jack Kerouacprimary authorall editionscalculated
Charters, AnnEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burroughs, William S.Photographysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The new American poetry as typified by the SF Renaissance (which means Ginsberg, me, Rexroth, Ferlinghetti, McClure, Corso, Gary Snyder, Philip Lamantia, Philip Whalen, I guess) is a kind of new-old Zen Lunacy poetry, writing whatever comes into your head as it comes, poetry returned to it origin, in the bardic child, truly ORAL as Ferling said, instead of gray faced Academic quibbling. Poetry & prose had for long time fallen into the false hands of the false. These new pure poets confess forth for the sheer joy of confession. They are CHILDREN. They are also childlike graybeard Homers singing in the street. They SING, they SWING. It is diametrically opposed to the Eliot shot, who so dismally advises his dreary negative rules like the objective correlative, etc. which is just a lot of constipation and ultimately emasculation of the pure masculine urge to freely sing. In spite of the dry rules he set down his poetry is itself sublime. I could say lots more but aint got time or sense. But SF is the poetry of a new Holy Lunacy like that of ancient times (Li Po, Hanshan, Tom O Bedlam, Kit Smart, Blake) yet it also has that mental discipline typified by the haiku (Basho, Buson), that is, the discipline of pointing out things directly, purely, concretely, no abstractions or explanations, wham wham the true blue song of man. - Jack Kerouac--THE ORIGINS OF JOY IN POETRY
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My beloved who wills not to love me:
My life which cannot love me:
I seduce both.
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Just as he upended the conventions of the novel with On the Road, Jack Kerouac revolutionized American poetry in this ingenious collection Bringing together selections from literary journals and his private notebooks, Jack Kerouac's Scattered Poems exemplifies the Beat Generation icon's innovative approach to language. Kerouac's poems, populated by hitchhikers, Chinese grocers, Buddhist saints, and cultural figures from Rimbaud to Harpo Marx, evoke the primal and the sublime, the everyday and the metaphysical. Scattered Poems, which includes the playfully instructive "How to Meditate," the sensory "San Francisco Blues," and an ode to Kerouac's fellow Beat Allen Ginsberg, is rich in striking images and strident urgency. Kerouac's widespread influences feel new and fresh in these poems, which echo the rhythm of improvisational jazz music, and the centuries-old structure of Japanese haiku. In rebelling against the dry rules and literary pretentiousness he perceived in early twentieth-century poetry, Kerouac pioneered a poetic style informed by oral tradition, driven by concrete language with neither embellishment nor abstraction, and expressed through spontaneous, uncensored writing.… (more)

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