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Hana's Suitcase by Karen Levine
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Hana's Suitcase (2002)

by Karen Levine

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (173)  Yiddish (1)  Danish (1)  All (175)
Showing 1-5 of 173 (next | show all)
The book goes back and forth between two stories: one about Hana and her family before and during the Holocaust, and one about a Japanese woman who received a suitcase and searched for more information about Hana and her family.

I like how the stories blend. One was equally as important as the other. I like the Japanese woman's persistence and the young groups interest in the suitcase, Hana, George and the holocaust in general and their eagerness to share what they learn with others in hopes that another holocaust will never happen again. I like Hana, her family and what they had up until everything fell apart.
( )
  jenn88 | Apr 25, 2017 |
This was my FAVORITE book we have read this semester. I loved everything about it. It was set in Tokyo, Japan when the book first began. However, when you read more, it has flashbacks from present day Japan to WWII in Czechoslovakia. Hana Brady is a little girl who was part of the holocaust whose suitcase falls into the arms of Fumiko Ishiok, a lady who runs a WWII museum in japan. When she begins her search to find out who Hana Brady is, she never believes it will take her on the this type of journey. I loved reading about Hana's backstory. I cried when I found out that George was still alive. I read this book twice because it was so good. I could go on and on about this story. I will DEFINITELY be teaching this in my class. ( )
  bbrelet | Apr 11, 2017 |
Hana's Suitcase is a wonderfully written biography that tells the story of two people, Hana Brady and Fumiko Ishioka. Hana is a young girl who is experiencing the Holocaust first-hand and loses her life; Fumiko is a Japanese woman who is creating a Holocaust museum and is intrigued by Hana's story. Karen Levine, the author, organizes the book in this way so that Fumiko is learning information about Hana at the same time we are.So, while Fumiko is traveling and collecting things about Hana's life, we too, as the readers, are learning the information about Hana's tragic story and experience during the Holocaust. I have always been interested in the events of the Holocaust so this book was very interesting to me. I definitely will include this book in my classroom library because the Holocaust is not something to be forgotten, along with the stories of its victims. ( )
  cedauzat | Apr 11, 2017 |
Hana's Suitcase is a very well written and takes the readers on two separate journeys, Hana's and Fumiko Ishoka's. In the introduction the readers are told the backgrounds of the war and Adolf Hitler's plan to eliminate Jewish people. Six million Jews were killed including one and a half million children. The author tells the story by separating the chapters. Hana is the main character of the first story and Fumiko Ishioka is in search of finding out all she could about Hana in the second story. The author tells both stories in chronological order easily flowing back and forth between the two characters and the different time frames. The author allows the readers to flow through the chapters with ease and leaves them excited to hear the next part. Hana's story starts with her happy childhood, living with her parents and her brother George. The story continues, informing readers of the horribleness Hana and her family went through because they were Jewish. Both of her parents get arrested and the children are sent to concentration camps and tells about the hardships they endured. Fumiko's story reveals her struggles in researching the story of the suitcase and little girl it belonged to. Fumiko manages to get the information she seeks. She discovered that Hana was not alone on this journey. The two stories melded into one when it is discovered that Hana had a brother who survived and is still alive. George's part of the story is very heart warming and will bring tears to the reader's eye. He visits Fumiko at the education center and tells the children his memories of his sister. Hana always wanted to be a teacher and now her story will be teaching children for years to come. This story was a fantastic read. This is my 3rd time reading the book and it never fails to make me cry. I will definitely have this in my classroom! ( )
  CKISSINGER | Apr 10, 2017 |
I absolutely loved this book! I have always been interested in World War II, so this is a subject I enjoy reading about. I have never read a book where there are two stories within the book, so this was a new experience to me. I really liked this setup because it bridged the World War II Era with the modern era. Even though the Holocaust happened many years ago, I think it is still important to learn about this major event in history.
I think having two parallel stories in the book keeps the reader's attention throughout the book. It also shows how the Holocaust still impacts life today; the Holocaust still has a lasting impact on today's society. I think by using a second story in the book, the author intertwined the stories just as the Holocaust is intertwined with the world's history.
I love the fact that the main character, Hana, was a school-aged child. I think this makes the book more interesting to students because they can put themselves in Hana’s shoes. I also think that adults are more sympathetic to the plight of a child than an adult. The Japanese museum trying to find out Hana’s story adds an element of mystery to book, so it is not just non-fiction facts. I really appreciated that the students in Japan were interested in the Holocaust because it is an important topic for students to understand. Being able to talk to Hana’s brother makes the story so much more real and heart wrenching.
I will definitely include this book in my classroom library in the future! ( )
  mkstorey | Apr 10, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 173 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Karen Levineprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kopczewska, RenataTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kosmal, MarianaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pressler, MirjamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
In March 2000, a suitcase arrived at a children's Holocaust education centre in Tokyo, Japan, with the name Hana Brady painted in white on the outside.
The centre's curator searches for clues across Europe and North America to find out who Hana was and what had happened to her. Her journey takes her back
through seventy years to a young Hana and her family, whose happy life in a small Czech town was turned upside down by the invasion of the Nazis.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0807531472, Paperback)

In March 2000, a suitcase arrived at a children's Holocaust education center in Tokyo, Japan. Hana Brady was written on the outside. Children who saw the suitcase on display were full of questions and the director decided to find the answers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:46 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

A biography of a Czech girl who died in the Holocaust, told in alternating chapters with an account of how the curator of a Japanese Holocaust center learned about her life after Hana's suitcase was sent to her.

» see all 3 descriptions

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