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Ipek: The Crescent & the Rose: Imperial Ottoman Silks and Velvets

by Nurhan Atasoy, Walter B. Denny (Co-author), Alison Effeny (Editor), Louise W. Mackie (Co-author), Julian Raby (Editor)1 more, Hulya Tezcan (Co-author)

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431587,991 (5)1
Status symbols, diplomatic gifts, artistic mediums and economic treasures--figured silk fabrics were among the most powerful and most characteristic artistic products of the Ottoman Empire. Wars were fought for control of silk revenues, and governments devoted major bureaucratic efforts toward the organization, regulation and taxation of silk production. Ipek: The Crescent & the Roseis the most comprehensive and magnificently illustrated overview of Ottoman silk textiles of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Its lavish, full-bleed, six-color reproductions of fabrics from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and from lesser-known ecclesiastical treasuries in the Balkans, Sweden, Poland and Russia, demonstrate the creativity of Ottoman weavers in rich detail, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in design or a general appreciation for visual delights. Accompanied by scholarly essays that shed light on the different historical, legislative, economic and technological factors that determined the history of these textiles.… (more)
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The best work on Ottoman textiles -- IF you get the hardback (which is what I have cataloged here). It used to be somewhat rare, but the recent re-release has put many more copies in circulation.
The reason to get the hardback is the 300+ pages of insane detail on Ottoman Silk production, much of which is SCA-period, and well-dated/documented to boot. Every aspect, from the way silkworms came to Ottoman lands to the final disposition of garments once a person died, is touched on.
The book even contains the weaving patterns for most of the major silk fabric types, so you can play along at home – as soon as you build one of the two-story drawlooms, also diagrammed here.
The images of garments are gorgeous, of course, however they are also not the best for reproduction, as they focus on details of weaving design over showing the entire garment in many images. ( )
1 vote asim | May 21, 2006 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nurhan Atasoyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Denny, Walter B.Co-authormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Effeny, AlisonEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Mackie, Louise W.Co-authormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Raby, JulianEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Tezcan, HulyaCo-authormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Status symbols, diplomatic gifts, artistic mediums and economic treasures--figured silk fabrics were among the most powerful and most characteristic artistic products of the Ottoman Empire. Wars were fought for control of silk revenues, and governments devoted major bureaucratic efforts toward the organization, regulation and taxation of silk production. Ipek: The Crescent & the Roseis the most comprehensive and magnificently illustrated overview of Ottoman silk textiles of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Its lavish, full-bleed, six-color reproductions of fabrics from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and from lesser-known ecclesiastical treasuries in the Balkans, Sweden, Poland and Russia, demonstrate the creativity of Ottoman weavers in rich detail, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in design or a general appreciation for visual delights. Accompanied by scholarly essays that shed light on the different historical, legislative, economic and technological factors that determined the history of these textiles.

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