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Daisy Fay and Miracle Man by Fannie Flagg
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Daisy Fay and Miracle Man (original 1981; edition 1993)

by Fannie Flagg (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,073487,783 (3.79)53
Fiction. Literature. Humor (Fiction.) HTML:“A hilarious, endearing novel.”—Los Angeles Times

In Fannie Flagg’s high-spirited first novel, we meet Daisy Fay Harper in the spring of 1952, where she’s “not doing much except sitting around waiting for the sixth grade.” When she leaves Shell Beach, Mississippi, in September 1959, she is packed up and ready for the Miss America Pageant, vowing “I won’t come back until I’m somebody.” But in our hearts she already is.

Sassy and irreverent from the get-go, Daisy Fay takes us on a rollicking journey through her formative years on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. There, at The End of the Road of the South, the family malt shop freezer holds unspeakable things, society maven Mrs. Dot hosts Junior Debutante meetings and shares inspired thoughts for the week (such as “sincerity is as valuable as radium”), and Daisy Fay’s Daddy hatches a quick-cash scheme that involves resurrecting his daughter from the dead in a carefully orchestrated miracle. Along the way, Daisy Fay does a lot of growing up, emerging as one of the most hilarious, appealing, and prized characters in modern fiction.

Praise for Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man

“Sheer unbeatable entertainment.”Cosmopolitan

“Unforgettable and irresistible.”Chattanooga Free Press

“Side-splittingly funny.”Cleveland Plain Dealer.
… (more)
Member:krbex
Title:Daisy Fay and Miracle Man
Authors:Fannie Flagg (Author)
Info:RH Canada UK Dist (1993), 336 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man by Fannie Flagg (1981)

  1. 30
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (infiniteletters)
  2. 21
    Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood by Rebecca Wells (VictoriaPL)
  3. 00
    Irma Voth by Miriam Toews (eleanor_eader)
    eleanor_eader: DFATMM is more definitively 'Young Adult' than Irma Voth, but a great coming-of-age tale from the point of view of a smart girl with a lot of questions. Not as dark as Irma Voth in themes, more humorous, (Toews is sparser with language, but perhaps more effective for it) but DFATMM also describes a complex unfolding into adulthood and Flagg is gifted with characterisation skills that remind me of Toews, or vice-versa.… (more)
  4. 00
    Looking for Salvation at the Dairy Queen by Susan Gregg Gilmore (dara85)
    dara85: Southern setting, death of family member, ice cream
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» See also 53 mentions

English (44)  Italian (2)  Spanish (1)  French (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
Daisy Fay moves with her parents to a beach in Mississippi to run an ice cream shop with her parents. She is in fifth grade when she moves to the beach. She meets many quirky characters in the town of Shell Beach. Daisy Fay joins the junior Debutantes and learns such important things as to how to accessorize with scarves, gloves and jewelry. Daisy has many friends and they go on many wacky adventures together including finding a body on the beach. This is written in the same style as Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg. If you enjoyed that book you are sure to enjoy this one. ( )
  dara85 | Apr 9, 2024 |
I read this one a while ago, and don't recall any details. ( )
  mykl-s | Aug 12, 2023 |
I recently read a book that reminded me of Fannie Flagg’s writing and took a look back at what I had read by her. For whatever reason I missed her debut novel but not anymore. Flagg is the type of writer that you can pick up anytime and become reacquainted with her style and humor. Written from the perspective of a young girl who has such an interesting “take” on her surroundings and relationships you can’t help but love Daisy Fay. Some of her thoughts are laugh out loud funny while some come close to breaking your heart.

Never stale, always enlightening and entertaining I am so glad I took a step back in time. ( )
  kimkimkim | Sep 5, 2022 |
I sure got some laughs out of this book. It is definitely a picture of the 50s in the South. ( )
  WellReadSoutherner | May 30, 2022 |
I thought I had read this book before, but apparently not. It was all new to me and a great read. Funny all the way through, with some thought provoking asides. Another Fannie Flagg book I can heartily recommend. ( )
  thosgpetri | Dec 13, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
What you are about to read . . . really did happen to me . . . or maybe it didn't . . . I'm not sure . . . but it doesn't matter . . . because it's true . . .
--Daisy Fay Harper
Dedication
For Marion, Bill and Patsy
First words
Hello there . . . my name is Daisy Fay Harper and I was eleven years old yesterday.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Fiction. Literature. Humor (Fiction.) HTML:“A hilarious, endearing novel.”—Los Angeles Times

In Fannie Flagg’s high-spirited first novel, we meet Daisy Fay Harper in the spring of 1952, where she’s “not doing much except sitting around waiting for the sixth grade.” When she leaves Shell Beach, Mississippi, in September 1959, she is packed up and ready for the Miss America Pageant, vowing “I won’t come back until I’m somebody.” But in our hearts she already is.

Sassy and irreverent from the get-go, Daisy Fay takes us on a rollicking journey through her formative years on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. There, at The End of the Road of the South, the family malt shop freezer holds unspeakable things, society maven Mrs. Dot hosts Junior Debutante meetings and shares inspired thoughts for the week (such as “sincerity is as valuable as radium”), and Daisy Fay’s Daddy hatches a quick-cash scheme that involves resurrecting his daughter from the dead in a carefully orchestrated miracle. Along the way, Daisy Fay does a lot of growing up, emerging as one of the most hilarious, appealing, and prized characters in modern fiction.

Praise for Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man

“Sheer unbeatable entertainment.”Cosmopolitan

“Unforgettable and irresistible.”Chattanooga Free Press

“Side-splittingly funny.”Cleveland Plain Dealer.

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