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The first stone : some questions about sex…
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The first stone : some questions about sex and power (edition 1995)

by Helen Garner

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289472,110 (3.34)5
In the autumn of 1992, two young women students at Melbourne University went to the police claiming that they had been indecently assaulted at a party. The man they accused was the head of their co-ed residential college. The shock of these charges split the community and painfully focused the debate about sex and power. 'This is writing of great boldness and it will wring the heart... an intense, eloquent and enthralling work...'-AUSTRALIAN 'This was never going to be an easy book to write, its pages are bathed in anguish and self-doubt, but suffused also with a white-hot anger...'-GOOD WEEKEND 'Travelling with Garner along the complex paths of this sad story is, strangely enough, enjoyable. The First Stone [is] a book worth reading for its writing...'-SYDNEY MORNING HERALD '... Garner has ensured one thing: the debate about sexual harassment... will now have a very public airing. And it will have it in the language of experience to which all women and men have access...'-AGE .… (more)
Member:Sirch
Title:The first stone : some questions about sex and power
Authors:Helen Garner
Info:Sydney : Picador, 1995.
Collections:Your library
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The First Stone: Some Questions About Sex and Power by Helen Garner

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Showing 4 of 4
I just don't know....The trouble with that early 'feminists' is that they often seem quite sexist later. Mind you. The trouble with the later ones is that they seem quite sexist sooner. I don't know...

But she does now how to tell a good story, even if it isn't necessarily the right one. ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
I remeber the events as background to my Honours year. I think Helen Garner gives an interesting insight into how she saw the events at Ormond College and an insight into how many of those involved were effected. It is a easy book to read and reminds us of the effect these events had in Melbourne at the time. ( )
  mjmorrison1971 | Jul 28, 2007 |
As a university undergradute in the 1990s, i can identify with many of the issues that Garner writes about in this book. There was a culture in Australian universities that harrassment was a big issue, and it did occassionally go overboard (the veiwpoint 'that every man is a potential rapist'is one i heard myself more than once)though i think the pendulum is starting to swing the other way again.
Garner is a good writer, and manages to take what could have been a very dry subject and bring it to life without making it a rant. There is enough of the personal in this to make it interesting, and the author is quite open in relating her biases. I do feel that occassionally she is a little too histrionic in her retelling of conversations with others, and the story does jump about a bit; but overall the reporting is top class.
While things may have moved on in the gender wars in Australia to other battlefields, this book is still important, even if only as an exhibit in the history of Australian feminism. I know that there was a lot of debate generated when it was first published, and i know it made me think through many principles that i myself hold. I hope the next reader is also able to take away something from reading this well written book. ( )
1 vote ForrestFamily | Mar 23, 2006 |
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Around lunchtime on Thursday 9 April 1992, a man called Dr Colin Shepherd went to the police station in the inner Melbourne suburb of Carlton.
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In the autumn of 1992, two young women students at Melbourne University went to the police claiming that they had been indecently assaulted at a party. The man they accused was the head of their co-ed residential college. The shock of these charges split the community and painfully focused the debate about sex and power. 'This is writing of great boldness and it will wring the heart... an intense, eloquent and enthralling work...'-AUSTRALIAN 'This was never going to be an easy book to write, its pages are bathed in anguish and self-doubt, but suffused also with a white-hot anger...'-GOOD WEEKEND 'Travelling with Garner along the complex paths of this sad story is, strangely enough, enjoyable. The First Stone [is] a book worth reading for its writing...'-SYDNEY MORNING HERALD '... Garner has ensured one thing: the debate about sexual harassment... will now have a very public airing. And it will have it in the language of experience to which all women and men have access...'-AGE .

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