HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Young Clementina (1935)

by D. E. Stevenson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
22214122,986 (3.8)35
Love, Loss, and Love Again... Charlotte Dean enjoys nothing more than the solitude of her London flat and the monotonous days of her work at a travel bookshop. But when her younger sister unceremoniously bursts into her quiet life one afternoon, Charlotte's world turns topsy-turvy. Beloved author D.E. Stevenson captures the intricacies of post-World War I England with a light, comic touch that perfectly embodies the spirit of the time. Alternatively heartbreaking and witty, The Young Clementina is a touch tale of love, loss, and redemption through friendship.… (more)
  1. 10
    The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery (emanate28, emanate28)
    emanate28: A bit of a fairy tale, it deals with a young woman who is resigned to being alone...but finds her life's not over yet!
    emanate28: A bit of a fairy tale, it deals with a young woman who is resigned to being alone...but finds her life's not over yet!
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 35 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
Had its good points but also had its low points. D.E Stevenson can do lovely, straightforward romances sometimes, but she can also get all modern and divorce-y, and in this story there was a fair amount of stupidity going around. Will probably vet my future Stevenson choices a little more carefully, have run into a couple of duds lately. ( )
  Alishadt | Feb 25, 2023 |
I can't really change my review of the prior edition. It's oddly good but poorly marketed. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
I feel like I should complain of false advertising. This cover, though gorgeous, doesn't really express the spirit of this novel. And, this being the first post-Barbara-Buncle Stevenson novel that I read, I was expecting something different.

I wallowed in indecision at the beginning of this book. I didn't really like the pity party it seemed to be. But at some part, I think after the courtroom scene when Char finally grew a spine, I thought this might be passably decent-- but I still was unprepared for the way I was disappointed when it ended. I'm not sure when I really came to enjoy the story but at some point I did. Not sure I would read it again... I don't prefer romances that take themselves too seriously (with the exception of a couple classics). But it was an enjoyable read. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
I found this book less humorous than Miss Buncle's Book but still very satisfying to the romantic in me. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 5, 2020 |
“The Young Clementina” (1938) by D.E. Stevenson, at least in its 2013 edition, is an easy book to misjudge by its cover. I expected something light and breezy, rather on the order of “Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day” by Winifred Watson, also first published in 1938 and made into an equally delightful film 70 years later. Stevenson's novel, while of comparable quality, is composed of more serious stuff.

We might also misjudge this book by its title. Charlotte Dean, the novel's narrator, has a younger sister named Clementina, though this pretty, manipulative woman calls herself Kitty. Kitty's daughter is also named Clementina. To which does the title refer? Neither, it turns out, lies at the center of the plot, although both are vital to it.

The key character, if not Charlotte herself, is Garth Wisdon, heir to an estate, whom she has loved since childhood. They plan to marry but the Great War interrupts those plans. When Charlotte first sees him after the war is over he is dramatically changed and shows no affection for her at all. He marries not her but Kitty and they soon have a daughter, while Charlotte settles into spinsterhood.

The marriage proves a stormy one, and Charlotte becomes a reluctant witness at their divorce trial. She discovers that her sister expects her to lie under oath on her behalf. Much else happens, best left for readers to discover on their own. These discoveries will be pleasurable and, for the most part, surprising.

Stevenson's novel turns into melodrama by the end, and that ending may be predictable. Still, on the whole, this is fine stuff, not the book we might expect but one we can enjoy. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Jan 12, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
D. E. Stevensonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Carey, EileenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
I wonder how a hermit would feel if he had spent twelve years in his cell and were called back to the world to take up the burden of life with its griefs and worries and fears; if he had passed through the fire of rebellion and achieved resignation; if his flesh had been purged by sleepless nights and his mind had found the anodyne of regular daily work.
Quotations
Pain is worthwhile sometimes. (Chap.1)
[…] but unlike a stranger, she leaned on me to the point of exhaustion. She brought every mood to me, every transitory mood of anger or fear. [ellisions added] (Chap. 2)
Kitty had become an undisciplined woman. She had been an undisciplined child, for her charm had carried her through trouble and saved her again and again from just punishment for her childish faults; but an undisciplined child can be lovable, can easily be forgiven, whereas an undisciplined woman is a weariness of the flesh. (Chap. 2)
I realized, too, that Kitty had coarsened, not physically […] but coarsened mentally or perhaps spiritually would be closer to the truth. […] The coarsening of her mental fibers dismayed me. It was more grief to realize her degeneration, than to contemplate the mess she had made of her life, for the one was an inner and the fundamental thing and the other merely fortuitous. [ellisions added] (Chap. 2)
I found your sister slightly exhausting, Miss Dean. She is very charming of course, but like many charming ladies, she lacks balance, and she has too few reticences. She does not bear her burdens on her own back; she unloads them onto the nearest person with a sublime disregard of the said person's feelings. Just a leetle bit inconsiderate, don't you find? (Chap. 6)
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Published under the titles "Miss Dean's Dilemma," "The Young Clementina," and, "Divorced from Reality."
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Love, Loss, and Love Again... Charlotte Dean enjoys nothing more than the solitude of her London flat and the monotonous days of her work at a travel bookshop. But when her younger sister unceremoniously bursts into her quiet life one afternoon, Charlotte's world turns topsy-turvy. Beloved author D.E. Stevenson captures the intricacies of post-World War I England with a light, comic touch that perfectly embodies the spirit of the time. Alternatively heartbreaking and witty, The Young Clementina is a touch tale of love, loss, and redemption through friendship.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
'D.E. Stevenson's brilliant gift for creating lively and attractive characters and a delightful country landscape, now bathed in sunshine, now shadowed by cloud, immediately engages the reader's sympathies in the joys and sorrows of Charlotte and Kitty Dean and their friend, Garth Wisdon. Their childhood is happy and carefree - all seems to promise happiness in the future. Then the blow falls and suddenly Garth changes from a sunny-natured young man into a miserable cynic. What mystery lies behind this sudden change? What is Garth's dreadful secret? Why does he choose to marry the beautiful girl with whom he has nothing in common? Too late Garth realises his mistake and turns to his daughter, the young Clementina, as his only comfort.
The story is full of suspense and the dramatic finish, though surprising, is completely satisfying.' (from Collins blurb)

*****************

Love, Loss, and Love Again...

Charlotte Dean enjoys nothing more than the solitude of her London flat and the monotonous days of her work at a travel bookshop. But when her younger sister unceremoniously bursts into her quiet life one afternoon, Charlotte's world turns topsy-turvy.

Beloved author D.E. Stevenson captures the intricacies of post-World War I England with a light, comic touch that perfectly embodies the spirit of the time. Alternatively heartbreaking and witty, The Young Clementina is a touch tale of love, loss, and redemption through friendship.
[retrieved 1/22/2014 from Amazon.com]
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 2
3 12
3.5 5
4 24
4.5 3
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 206,952,211 books! | Top bar: Always visible