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The Complete Cartoons of the New Yorker (2004)

by Robert Mankoff (Editor)

Other authors: Charles Addams (Cartoonist), Roger Angell (Contributor), Peter Arno (Cartoonist), George Booth (Cartoonist), Roz Chast (Cartoonist)16 more, David Remnick (Foreword), Robert Day (Cartoonist), Nancy Franklin (Contributor), Ian Frazier (Contributor), Adam Gopnik (Introduction), Bruce Eric Kaplan (Cartoonist), Rebecca Mead (Contributor), George Price (Cartoonist), Lilian Ross (Contributor), Mark Singer (Contributor), William Steig (Cartoonist), Saul Steinberg (Cartoonist), James Thurber (Cartoonist), Calvin Trillin (Contributor), John Updike (Contributor), Jack Ziegler (Cartoonist)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,336914,381 (4.41)23
"Over 2,000 selected cartoons ... appear in the ... hardcover, and all 68,647 are featured on the two accompanying CD-ROMs (a digital anthology fully browsable by date, subject, and artist)."--Publisher's website. CD-ROMs contain all cartoons published in the "New Yorker" from 1925 Feb. 21 through 2004 Feb. 23, and comprise the contributions of hundreds of artists, including works of: Constantin Alajalov, Douglas Borgstedt, Boris Drucker, Alan Dunn, Sid Hoff, Mary Petty, Otto Soglow, and Gluyas Williams.… (more)
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» See also 23 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Definitely more of a pick-and-skim/coffee table thing than a read through, but much fun all the same. Nifty slices of history, and comes with CDs of the same, which make for easy e-reading later. ( )
  wetdryvac | Mar 2, 2021 |
I had a great-aunt, sort of an Auntie Mame kind of woman. Sophisticated, funny, etc. I still remember visiting her in Warren,PA, and spending afternoons curled up in her library by the fireplace reading New Yorker cartoons. I felt very sophisticated. This book of New Yorker cartoons takes me back about 50 years and still makes me feel sophisticated. ( )
  CarmenOhio | Jul 2, 2009 |
What's not to like about this great book which can be looked on as a social history book? The cartoons themselves carry great commentary as to the times in which they were created. ( )
1 vote msimelda | Dec 18, 2008 |
This review was also published, in a slightly enhanced & more comfortable format, at my blog between drafts.

While this book is widely available now at a bargain price, it was worth its original price tag too. 2004 cartoons in excellent print quality on 650 pages plus, on two CDs, almost 70,000 cartoons in PDF format, comprising every cartoon The New Yorker ever ran from 1925–2004. The cartoons on the CDs, though, are not in the best quality; one has to zoom in rather often and should have a large-ish screen to do so. Still, some details will be hard to recognize or lost altogether. (Plus, you can’t copy/paste the cartoons.) On the upside, the CDs are browsable by date, subject, and artist.

Three key aspects stand out with regard to these cartoons.

First, they’re practically all absolutely brilliant, even if you have to have loads of “cultural knowledge” to be able to appreciate them at all, or to appreciate them even more. The second aspect is that these cartoons convey a sense of historical and social change in a medium that’s anything but dry and wearisome, to say the least. And the third aspect is that you can develop a sense for how many different possibilities there are to “think out of the box”—with techniques like combining seemingly incompatible topics by juxtaposition, understatement, and so on, both in text and artwork. If you’re a writer and/or copywriter, this gives you an idea about what you can achieve if you try hard.
  gyokusai | Jan 26, 2008 |
A sumptuous book, collecting 2004 of the best cartoons from "The New Yorker", from 1925 to 2004, arranged by decade. Even better, though, are the 2 CD's that come with the book, collecting all 68,647 cartoons from the magazine's history, arranged in any number of searchable ways. Page 15, by the way, has one of the most famous cartoon lines, with the little girl saying to her mother, "Well, I say it's spinach, and I say the hell with it." Other memorable cartoons are on pg. 12, 62 (Peter Arno), 76 (top), 94 (bottom), 100 (Thurber), 104 (Arno), 140 (Carl Rose), 175 (Arno), 179 (Arno again - what can I say?), 553 (the inimitable S. Gross), 590 (rat suicide). Actually, 90% of the cartoons are really quite good; The New Yorker deserves its reputation as a premier magazine for witty and erudite cartoons. And there's even room for the occasional dumb chuckle. ( )
  burnit99 | Feb 6, 2007 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mankoff, RobertEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Addams, CharlesCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Angell, RogerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arno, PeterCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Booth, GeorgeCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chast, RozCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
David RemnickForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Day, RobertCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Franklin, NancyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Frazier, IanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gopnik, AdamIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kaplan, Bruce EricCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mead, RebeccaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Price, GeorgeCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ross, LilianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Singer, MarkContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Steig, WilliamCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Steinberg, SaulCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thurber, JamesCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Trillin, CalvinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Updike, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ziegler, JackCartoonistsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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"Over 2,000 selected cartoons ... appear in the ... hardcover, and all 68,647 are featured on the two accompanying CD-ROMs (a digital anthology fully browsable by date, subject, and artist)."--Publisher's website. CD-ROMs contain all cartoons published in the "New Yorker" from 1925 Feb. 21 through 2004 Feb. 23, and comprise the contributions of hundreds of artists, including works of: Constantin Alajalov, Douglas Borgstedt, Boris Drucker, Alan Dunn, Sid Hoff, Mary Petty, Otto Soglow, and Gluyas Williams.

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