HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Greatest: Muhammad Ali by Walter Dean…
Loading...

The Greatest: Muhammad Ali (2001)

by Walter Dean Myers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5071131,280 (3.74)4
The story of Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay) and his rise to the top in boxing to become The Greatest.

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
4.5/5 Stars

Really good. Well written book about Muhammad Ali's life in boxing.

I am not a boxing fan but I do like Muhammad Ali a lot. Our beliefs are different but I learned to respect him for the man he is for his fight during the Civil Rights Movement and his fight against joining the army to fight in a war he didn't agree with (more to it than that I'm sure but that was the top reason I always heard him give when I listened to him speak on why he didn't want to be in the military). The fact he was willing to be a "representative" for his people/someone for them to look up to...I admired as well.

I wasn't born until 1974 so naturally I didn't grow up during the era he did (Jim Crow segregation, etc) but as I got older, especially my high school years and 20's, my love for learning about the C.R.M. was strong and something I need to get back into again...that's how Ali really became a part of being in my "line of vision" when it came to learning more about him. When I saw this book in the thrift store, I had to grab it not reading the summary. It wasn't until I started reading it that I realized it focuses mostly on his career...I didn't think I'd like it but was determined to get it finished and I'm glad I did. It taught me how the term "rope a dope" started and where "Thrilla is Manilla" came from. His wins, losses, etc. I can't say I know everything about boxing now, but I can say I know more than what I did before going into it.

I learned, a supposed racist, gave Ali a robe that he ended up putting "People's Champion" on the back of it! That supposed racist? Elvis Presley! Mind you, Ali was a Muslim by this point. So, for two people who were/are racist...why talk to each other? During a time it was acceptable for white men to be so? I've always liked Elvis' movies and never thought of him as racist. Did many have prejudices? Yes! But having a prejudice doesn't = racism. I think to a certain degree, we all do, even if we don't realize it or we fight against it. But, I'm off of that rant! :-)

This is another book that has opened my eyes to some things and I love this book for that reason. :-)

(There may be typos because I typed this on my Kindle. I may come to check for them later but I was just ready to get this review up while it was fresh on my mind) ( )
  RamblingBookNerd | Jun 5, 2019 |
This piece of non-fiction is written by Walter Dean Myers. He uses his typical flair to describe the life of Muhammad Ali, the famous boxer. The book follows Ali's life from his beginnings as a boxer known as Cassius Clay, through his adoption of Islam and changing his name to Muhammad Ali. Myers includes photographs to illustrate the book and add visual appeal for transitional readers. In addition to looking at the life of Ali outside of the sport, Myers intersperses information about Ali's famous fights as well. This book could connect well to a study on black history or civil rights. As well, I think it is an excellent book for boys he may be interested in boxing.
  jstrecker | Apr 18, 2016 |
Ali IS the Greatest. What a life story. He is a rare, living, American hero. ( )
  RalphLagana | Jan 23, 2016 |
I thought the book The Greatest Muhammad Ali by Walter Dean Myers was a fantastic book and would recommend it to everyone. It was action packed and had me waiting on the edge of my seat the whole time.
I thought this book was great because of some of the stuff that Muhammad Ali had to face and overcome. One of the big things that he had to overcome was where he grew up. Muhammad grew up in a bad city. And when he grew up, most young black kids fell into a bad path with drugs. But when Muhammad was little he found a role model that would give him someone to look up too and someone to help him train in the gym. So this helped him stay off the streets and in the gym. Now, not only did Muhammad have to worry about staying off the seats but he also had to worry about fighting some of the best boxers in the world when he was still just a teenager. He when the Olympics when he was just sixteen! That means he was training harder then anyone else in thew world.
I think this book inspired a lot of young kids no matter if they were rich or poor because it showed kids that they can accomplish anything they set their minds too. So i think this book was more then just telling the fight of Muhammad but also gives people hopes. This is why I loved this book so much! ( )
  br14bifa | Jun 5, 2014 |
I liked so much this book, it tells all the story of Muhammad Ali. why he started in boxing, all the fights and the superation, all about him, it was a very awesome book.
  reixx.vj | Mar 4, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
TO RUDINE SIMS BISHOP IN APPRECIATION OF HER YEARS OF FRIENDSHIP. --W.D.M.
First words
Heroes that looked anything like me were hard to come by when I was a kid growing up in Harlem.
Quotations
"Everything I do has a purpose, all of God's beings have a purpose. Others may know pleasure, but pleasure is not happiness. It has no more importance than a shadow following a man." --Muhammad Ali
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.74)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5 1
4 7
4.5
5 4

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,777,016 books! | Top bar: Always visible