HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Practices of an Agile Developer: Working in the Real World

by Venkat Subramaniam, Andy Hunt

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
367869,812 (3.81)None
These are the proven, effective agile practices that will make you a better developer. You'll learn pragmatic ways of approaching the development process and your personal coding techniques. You'll learn about your own attitudes, issues with working on a team, and how to best manage your learning, all in an iterative, incremental, agile style. You'll see how to apply each practice, and what benefits you can expect. Bottom line: This book will make you a better developer.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
NF
  vorefamily | Feb 22, 2024 |
The practices in this book are genuinely good and worth thinking about. The presentation format - essentially a long list of advice - could use some work.

Some good quotes:

Agile development uses feedback to make constant adjustments in a highly collaborative environment.

Software development doesn’t happen in a chart, an IDE, or a design tool; it happens in your head.

No plan survives contact with the enemy. - Helmuth von Moltke

As U.S. President Eisenhower said, “The plan is worthless. The planning is essential.”

You can’t freeze requirements any more than you can freeze markets, competition, learning, evolution, or growth. ( )
  brikis98 | Nov 11, 2015 |
There are several new-fangled models of software development out there, and most of the writing on them reads like the indoctrination materials of some weird cult. This is no different, a collection of aphorisms and anecdotes, many of them contradictory, all with a sort of blandly uplifting feel. In this case, the book consists of a series of slogans - "Invest in your Team!" ,"Criticize Ideas, Not People!", and so forth - which are expanded into short mini-chapters, each one ending with a brief section titled "What it feels like". This last section is a present-tense, second person statement about what the given slogan will do for you. At the end of "Invest in your team", you are informed that "It feels like everyone is getting smarter. The whole team is aware of new technology and starts pointing out how to apply it or points out pitfalls to watch for." When you've learned to "criticize ideas, not people", apparently "It feels comfortable when the team discusses the genuine merits and possible drawbacks of several candidate solutions." And, as a bonus, "You can reject solutions that have too many drawbacks without hurt feelings, and imperfect (but still better) solutions can be adopted without guilt."
Perhaps this begins to sound a bit famliar: this is the language of the self-help book, the motivational speaker. This is the bland, trance-inducing jargon of the management seminar, the stuff that is sufficiently content free as to offer no grounds for objection (you can't object to nothing) and simultaneously justify anything.
Agile development may well be a useful mode in which to operate, and some of it seems quite interesting, but I would feel a little better about it if the people advocating it weren't so, well, creepy. ( )
  kiparsky | Sep 29, 2009 |
Yay, "it's Code Complete for the Trainspotting generation".A load of good ideas/"best practices" condensed down into a couple of hundred pages. Probably not essential if you've read The Pragmatic Programmer, but a damn good read. ( )
  stephenaturton | Mar 9, 2009 |
I always enjoy the Pragmatic Programmers books (well, "Behind Closed Doors" wasn't great), and this book had a lot of good advice.

I'm going to see whether I can start using a 'daylog' to keep track of solutions that I've come up with... ( )
  dvf1976 | Apr 24, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Venkat Subramaniamprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hunt, Andymain authorall editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

These are the proven, effective agile practices that will make you a better developer. You'll learn pragmatic ways of approaching the development process and your personal coding techniques. You'll learn about your own attitudes, issues with working on a team, and how to best manage your learning, all in an iterative, incremental, agile style. You'll see how to apply each practice, and what benefits you can expect. Bottom line: This book will make you a better developer.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.81)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 4
2.5
3 14
3.5 4
4 23
4.5 3
5 13

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,615,615 books! | Top bar: Always visible