HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Godslayer (2005)

by Jacqueline Carey

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Sundering (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7411425,138 (3.7)29
IF ALL THAT IS GOOD CONSIDERS YOU EVIL, ARE YOU? Once human but now immortal, Supreme Commander Lord Tanaros fled the realm of Men and chose darkness when he killed his adulterous wife and his liege king who cuckholded him. A thousand years have passed in service to his master, the dark god Satoris. The world view Satoris as Evil Prime and the name of Tanaros is the byword for treachery. The races have united in their quest to rid the world of the Dark God and his minions. The key to the prophecy is the beautiful Elvish princess Cerelinde--and Satoris has captured her. Yet not all tales told are true and evil may have another face. Satoris refuses to act like the monster that he is made out to be for he recognizes in Cerelinde a spark of the love that he once bore for his fellow gods. But this spark of light might prove to be a danger to Satoris...and a greater danger for Tanaros and all that he holds dear. For Cerelinde might remind him that the heart that he willed to iron an eon ago is still very much mortal.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 29 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
I adore Jacqueline Carey--she really is one of my favorites. For some reason, though, this two-book series didn't live up to her other works for me. I suppose I just wanted more from it; the story was there, but I wanted the luscious depth of character and plot and story that I've seen in her longer works (and some of her shorter ones, too!), and just didn't get it. For such relatively short books (compared to other fantasies and her own fantasies, at least), I think the story just may have been spread between too many characters.

That said... for readers who read the first book (and you definitely need to read that one first), this one is worth reading if you're at all inclined. I thought this book moved quite a bit faster and was also easier to engage with than the first in the series, so I'm glad I ended up reading it. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Dec 17, 2019 |
A beautiful and heart wrenching story with some brilliant characters like Tanaros and Ushahin. This will stay in my mind for a long time. ( )
  kasyapa | Oct 9, 2017 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2662044.html

I've generally been a huge fan of Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel books, and picked up Godslayer at a convention ages ago; and then on advice got Banewreaker to read first. They are really a very different kettle of fish. Written between the first and second Kushiel trilogies, these two books take the standard fantasy quest narrative and try to tell it from the point of view of the evil side not really being all that bad. It's a worthy attempt, and I kept reading, spotting different bits and pieces taken from Tolkien and other writers and slightly reinvented, but it didn't really grab me.

In particular, the names of some of the characters are so wrong that it's very distracting. One key figure is called Malthus, and I kept expecting him to start preaching on the problems of overpopulation; another is called Carfax, and unfortunately that name makes me think of traffic jams in Oxford before anything else. It's a real shame; Carey's ear for names in the Kushiel books seems to have been rather good, but here that talent deserted her. ( )
  nwhyte | Jun 18, 2016 |
Forebodingly elegiacal, the tension builds over the course of the book until the ending is as much a realease for the reader as for the characters. I found particularly compelling the position of Sartoris as the "evil" shaper, with Haomane's Allies the "good" characters.

The striving of all of the individual characters, their loyalty and faith, stood in stark contrast to the absence of the other Shapers in the narrative. One has no idea what their desires or goals are, or even if they know or care about the millions of live and oceans of blood lost in their names. The only Shaper who has any connection with those battling in the Shaper's War is Satoris, which in a way makes him the perfect villain. He's present, which means that his flaws and mistakes can be seen, but not those of the his brothers and sisters.

I found Carey's writing incredibly haunting, with the inexorable drive towards the fulfillment of the prophecy really gripping. ( )
  Kimberlynwm | Aug 11, 2013 |
sequel to Banewreaker, the pair collected as The Sundering. there's a grandeur to it, the Godslayer forces doggedly trying to outrun both fate and time. and there's a poignancy to the characters, as magnificent in defeat as they are in ascendance. it's a Tolkeinian clash of forces with a world at stake, a larger battle between good and evil. but where it really becomes interesting is: who holds the high ground really on that moral plane? they all have honour, justification, the greater good in mind. all of them choose, or feel in good faith they have no choices. moreover, the story is told from the point of view of those who lose, at which time a world ends, and begins again. but all of them on both sides fight for what they think is right, and they have their reasons - yet they are pawns in the gods' war they can't see, and can never win. and to the extent that they come to know that, and have compassion for those they fight, they may yet change the new world birthed by the end of this struggle, by the sacrifices they make, the blood they shed. a small classic. one book, really, not two, and splitting it into two did no service to the build, or the power of its ending. ( )
  macha | Jul 21, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jacqueline Careyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
All things converge.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

IF ALL THAT IS GOOD CONSIDERS YOU EVIL, ARE YOU? Once human but now immortal, Supreme Commander Lord Tanaros fled the realm of Men and chose darkness when he killed his adulterous wife and his liege king who cuckholded him. A thousand years have passed in service to his master, the dark god Satoris. The world view Satoris as Evil Prime and the name of Tanaros is the byword for treachery. The races have united in their quest to rid the world of the Dark God and his minions. The key to the prophecy is the beautiful Elvish princess Cerelinde--and Satoris has captured her. Yet not all tales told are true and evil may have another face. Satoris refuses to act like the monster that he is made out to be for he recognizes in Cerelinde a spark of the love that he once bore for his fellow gods. But this spark of light might prove to be a danger to Satoris...and a greater danger for Tanaros and all that he holds dear. For Cerelinde might remind him that the heart that he willed to iron an eon ago is still very much mortal.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.7)
0.5 1
1 6
1.5 1
2 8
2.5
3 49
3.5 6
4 53
4.5 8
5 37

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 174,229,031 books! | Top bar: Always visible