HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Vanki nimeltä Papillon by Henri…
Loading...

Vanki nimeltä Papillon (original 1969; edition 1985)

by Henri Charrière, Matti Brotherus

Series: Papillon Series (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,318563,011 (4.02)58
Henri Charrir?e, called "Papillon," for the butterfly tattoo on his chest, was convicted in Paris in 1931 of a murder he did not commit. Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana, he became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison, Devil's Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped . . . until Papillon. His flight to freedom remains one of the most incredible feats of human cunning, will, and endurance ever undertaken. Charrir?e's astonishing autobiography, Papillon, was published in France to instant acclaim in 1968, more than twenty years after his final escape. Since then, it has become a treasured classic -- the gripping, shocking, ultimately uplifting odyssey of an innocent man who would not be defeated.… (more)
Member:irvikita
Title:Vanki nimeltä Papillon
Authors:Henri Charrière
Other authors:Matti Brotherus
Info:Helsingissä [Hki] Otava 1985
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Papillon by Henri Charrière (1969)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 58 mentions

English (43)  Czech (3)  Spanish (3)  Slovak (2)  French (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Dutch (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (55)
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
Papillon by Henri Charriere (2001)
  arosoff | Jul 10, 2021 |
nonfiction/prison escape stories (multiple attempts). (on audio) ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
I don't care if this book wasn't a 100% factual, honest-to-God documentary account of what actually happened to this guy - it was a magnificent adventure novel, full of blood and drama and action. From what I can tell, Charrière cobbled the narrative out of his own experiences as a prisoner in the pitiless camps of 1930s French Guyana, plus the stories of a few camp-mates, plus his own dramatic license, emerging with a masterpiece. There were many moments where the story is less than totally plausible (if you created a drinking game where you took a shot each time a beautiful woman befriended him out of the blue, or people started doing favors for him for no reason, or an important official preposterously took him into their trust, you would be dead drunk inside of three chapters), and yet Charrière crafted a completely absorbing tropical world of hardened criminals, miserable wretches, forbidding prisons, thrilling escapes, and all-around awesome displays of survival.

I think my favorite part, out of a lot of great parts, was Papillon's moment of agonizing choice about a third of the way in, between staying in his beautiful Venezuelan paradise with his two new-found native wives, and returning to seek "vengeance" on what he thinks is the unjust society that shipped him halfway across the world to rot in a jungle charnel house. He idiotically chooses to leave this blissful native paradise, but even when I was cursing him for being a fool I thought his reflections on the differences between the "civilized" European culture who'd condemned him and the indigenous cultures who'd adopted him were well-written and interesting in the light of the complicated relationship Western countries have had with their colonies. The French, while not exactly angels, were often more willing than their neighbors the Spanish and the British to go native and peacefully blend into the various cultures who inhabited their colonies.

While I think he overdid the Noble Savage trope a little bit, in terms of the story it makes the protagonist the perfect lone wolf badass who's as at home charming the well-to-do wives of the colonial administrators as he is getting laid with the daughters of whatever tribal chieftains he runs into. Another one of my favorite parts was his first experience in solitary at Devil's Island - I've read other books with prison scenes in them, but his description of the soul-crushing loneliness it engenders is one of the best, and was surely the prototype for countless others. And of course all his various escape attempts are amazing too, but every part of the book can't be your favorite, that's like having dessert for every meal, something only a child would do. This book hit me squarely on that kind of undiluted childish pleasure level. I wish I'd read it when I was twelve, it would have been the perfect companion to The Count of Monte Cristo and Robinson Crusoe. Now to go track down the movie! ( )
  aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
I know this book is a classic, but it was hard for me to get past the dated language and plodding narration. I found the description of France's horrible prison conditions interesting, but it was hard to know how accurate that was. ( )
  tombrown | Feb 21, 2020 |
An inspiring true story which exemplifies a love of life and a will to be free against all odds. ( )
  Andrewsk1 | Jan 12, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charrière, Henriprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Castelnau, Jean-PierreIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michaels, Walter B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Brian, PatrickTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, June P.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the Venezuelan people,
to the humble fisherman in the Gulf of Paria,
to everybody-the intellectuals, the military
and all the others-who gave me a chance
to live again,

and to Rita, my wife and dearest friend.
First words
It was a knockout blow--a punch so overwhelming that I didn't get back on my feet for fourteen years.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Henri Charrir?e, called "Papillon," for the butterfly tattoo on his chest, was convicted in Paris in 1931 of a murder he did not commit. Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana, he became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison, Devil's Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped . . . until Papillon. His flight to freedom remains one of the most incredible feats of human cunning, will, and endurance ever undertaken. Charrir?e's astonishing autobiography, Papillon, was published in France to instant acclaim in 1968, more than twenty years after his final escape. Since then, it has become a treasured classic -- the gripping, shocking, ultimately uplifting odyssey of an innocent man who would not be defeated.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5 1
1 11
1.5 3
2 27
2.5 8
3 111
3.5 52
4 266
4.5 38
5 246

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,156,186 books! | Top bar: Always visible