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The Middle Place by Kelly Corrigan
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The Middle Place (original 2008; edition 2009)

by Kelly Corrigan (Author)

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9935116,327 (3.86)24
At 36, Kelly had a good marriage, a couple of kids, and a weekly newspaper column. But she still saw herself as George Corrigan's daughter. A garrulous Irish-American charmer from Baltimore, George was the center of the ebullient, raucous Corrigan clan. Kelly's was a colorful childhood, just the sort a girl could get attached to. She lives deep within what she calls the Middle Place--"that sliver of time when parenthood and childhood overlap"--but she's abruptly shoved into a coming-of-age when she finds a lump in her breast. And so her journey to full-blown adulthood begins. When George, too, learns he has late-stage cancer, it is Kelly's turn to take care of the man who had always taken care of her--and show us a woman as she finally takes the leap and grows up.--From publisher description.… (more)
Member:Plant2flower
Title:The Middle Place
Authors:Kelly Corrigan (Author)
Info:Hachette Books (2009), Edition: 1st, 272 pages
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The Middle Place by Kelly Corrigan (2008)

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» See also 24 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
I loved every page. Funny. Endearing. Real. ( )
  Tosta | Jul 5, 2021 |
(The innocence factor starts strong in the book and then starts to wear off, actually they both seemed bad; she lied about going to church as a birthday present and they lied about her father’s health because she was on vacation, lying to escape the heat.... but from the innocence place I began:)

The most typical experience in life, I suppose, is one of unsatisfactory substitution instead of satisfactory addition: we try to substitute a perfect relationship with spouse and children for our wanting relationship with our parents..... instead of going from strength to strength. This girl, in so many ways typical and from whom life apparently did not demand the sacrifices of an Anne Frank, nevertheless knew better, and understood that her success with her husband and daughters rested on her success with her father and mother. In certain ways my own life has not been so charmed as hers but I do not resent her her happiness, to the extent that it was possible for her.... Of course unhappiness and difficult times comes to all of us, sometimes, especially as an adult, and as a child she fought with her mother, a bit.

I found it to be sorta a good book but if I tried too hard to boil it down into words it wouldn’t look like much.

.... And of course I guess that she wouldn’t have done those little bad things if she thought that it was wrong.... And that’s the only thing that bothers me, not her aversion to coining metaphors or whatever.

.... That was all about the first half. The second half is pretty similar, maybe a bit better, but I couldn’t find another topic to treat at length.

But I guess it’s mostly ok. (It’s not Pure Wholesome, IMO, but it’s in the general vicinity.)

I guess it raises the question of how much medical intervention talk you can let into your life before you become a valetudinarian, (ie you’re not really living), but I don’t have a quotable answer to that one. (Ironically I read this book, dream about midlife, instead of another anxiety book.)

Then again it’s hardly all business, which is good.

.... As a sociological thing, thinking that the doctors aren’t human enough but not being in favor of the new age (“does it really matter what I’m thinking?”), a certain ambivalence, is pretty representative. (Also, mostly liking her dad’s faith but not having it herself.)

.... I liked the part about not being a nun or whatever because not everybody has to be a nun, but if it were me, I’d look into dialing down the attachment a notch. That’s probably not my own problem, attachment to fathers and children, I mean, so it’s easy for me to say, but.
  goosecap | May 16, 2021 |
This was an easy and fast read with an ok story. I liked the author's voice and she made it easy for me to see myself in her shoes. I just thought she could have done a better job of writing the story so that it was more enticing. There was a lot going on in her life, but it didn't feel like there was when I was reading it.

I was hoping throughout the book that she would get to know her mother. I kind of got the feeling that her mother has a story to tell, but Corrigan never took the time to learn it...of course, to be fair, she kind of has her hands full. ( )
  pmichaud | Dec 21, 2020 |
It's not just a story of a woman whom is diagnosed with breast cancer, but of her relationships with her family; mother, father, brothers, now and when she was growing up. (and finding she is still growing up.)
She loves her father unconditionally and is working on appreciating her mother. She's working on the relationship with her husband and her growing daughters.
And then there's the issue of working through her cancer and the ongoing cancer of her father.
This is a great book, though I've read various reviews about the author being a whining brat. She is a father's daughter, but not what I would call the current daddy's girl stereo type.
She is intense, she is caring, she has her faults. She confesses to all.
What I enjoyed was the wit and that it isn't as intense a "breast cancer" read as one I've read in the past. ( )
  VhartPowers | Dec 27, 2018 |
I listened to the audio version and while I was listening I thought it was an okay story. I rarely give anything less than 3 stars which makes my decision to give 2 stars to this book a bit challenging. Classified as a memoir it is the story of a woman who claims to be caught in the "middle place", a place where we are adults caring for our own children while attempting to manage our aging parent's health. The twist in this tale is that both the author and her Dad end up battling cancer at the the same time. I felt for the author as I have been in that "middle place" and it is not an easy place to be. The author enjoyed a special relationship with her Dad and while it was wonderful seeing how they loved each other it was clear she still enjoyed being the "child". Growing up is not an easy task but eventually we all should do it. If the reader can get past that self indulgent attitude it might be a good book for you. ( )
  bostonterrio | Nov 21, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kelly Corriganprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gilbert, TaviaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Most everything I do these days is dedicated to Edward and the girls, but this book is for Phoebe, who wouldn't let it go.
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The thing you need to know about me is that I am George Corrigan's daughter, his only daughter.
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At 36, Kelly had a good marriage, a couple of kids, and a weekly newspaper column. But she still saw herself as George Corrigan's daughter. A garrulous Irish-American charmer from Baltimore, George was the center of the ebullient, raucous Corrigan clan. Kelly's was a colorful childhood, just the sort a girl could get attached to. She lives deep within what she calls the Middle Place--"that sliver of time when parenthood and childhood overlap"--but she's abruptly shoved into a coming-of-age when she finds a lump in her breast. And so her journey to full-blown adulthood begins. When George, too, learns he has late-stage cancer, it is Kelly's turn to take care of the man who had always taken care of her--and show us a woman as she finally takes the leap and grows up.--From publisher description.

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