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Your Inner Fish: The Amazing Discovery of…
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Your Inner Fish: The Amazing Discovery of Our 375-Million-Year-Old… (edition 2009)

by Neil Shubin

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1,981585,453 (3.96)153
Neil Shubin, a leading paleontologist and professor of anatomy who discovered Tiktaalik--the "missing link" that made headlines around the world in April 2006--tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years, long before the first creatures walked the earth. By examining fossils and DNA, Shubin shows us that our hands actually resemble fish fins, our head is organized like that of a long-extinct jawless fish, and major parts of our genome look and function like those of worms and bacteria.--From publisher description.… (more)
Member:liulibrary
Title:Your Inner Fish: The Amazing Discovery of Our 375-Million-Year-Old Ancestor
Authors:Neil Shubin
Info:Penguin (2009), Paperback, 256 pages
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Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body by Neil Shubin

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» See also 153 mentions

English (55)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (58)
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
Traces human physiognomy back to its origins in the earliest known life forms. For instance, the bones in fins changed to proto-limbs as fish began to adapt to life on land, and this structure evolved into the human wrist. ( )
  sethwilpan | Aug 12, 2019 |
'Bait-and-switch' would be an appropriate metaphor to evaluate this book. Usually, praise on the cover blurb isn't worth reading, but some of the confusion can be gleaned from it. Shubin is a biologist specialized in the anatomy of fish. The first four chapters are about the discovery of a fossil which is an important missing link in evolution theory about fish evolving into land animals. This is what interested me to buy the book. However, the rest of the book is an elementary course in human anatomy, cross compared with fish. I already knew that. So, yeah well, the first 80 pages were interesting. A book with a rather misleading cover. ( )
  edwinbcn | Nov 13, 2018 |
An interesting look at how the evolution of the human body can be traced and mirrored in other animals, both modern and ancient. Some parts are written exactly the way you would expect a lecture to be spoken. Other parts are more like a memoir. Despite these alterations in style, it's an easy book to read, at least if you have some background in biology. Definitely worth a read if you have an interest in human anatomy, or evolution in general. ( )
  AngelaJMaher | Aug 11, 2018 |
Within us human beings like the bones, tissue and DNA of fish: who knew?! This chatty book makes even higher-level genetics interesting... even this liberal arts gal enjoyed the read. ( )
  mjspear | Aug 1, 2018 |
A great book about the evolution of fish into proto-mammals and the science that leads to theories that leads to paleontology that leads to proof of those theories.

The author is an excellent writer - able to make these concepts easy to understand without dumming down the science. I especially like the way the chapters were ordered - each chapter played off another. Also, Shubin always came back to how each change from fish, to amphibian, to mammal, relates back to humans. Very good read. ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Mar 11, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
Shubin's engaging book reveals our fishy origins (for which we can thank hiccupping and hernias) and shows how life on Earth is profoundly interrelated. A book after Darwin's heart.
 
Shubin connects with sections on his own work discovering fossils, and on the sometimes surprising roots of modern human complaints. But the paleontologist can't escape his own academic history — much of Your Inner Fish reads like a cross between fleshed-out lecture notes and a dummed-down textbook.
 
Your Inner Fish combines Shubin's and others' discoveries to present a twenty-first-century anatomy lesson. The simple, passionate writing may turn more than a few high-school students into aspiring biologists.
added by jlelliott | editNature, Carl Zimmer (pay site) (Jan 17, 2008)
 

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shubin, Neilprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barth, BrianCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cashman, MarcNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monoyios, KalliopiIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nieuwstadt, Mark vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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