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The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams
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The War of the Flowers (original 2003; edition 2003)

by Tad Williams

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,235295,993 (3.81)50
A masterpiece of the imagination, THE WAR OF THE FLOWERS is a truly epic novel that once again pushes the boundaries of fantasy fiction into new and unexplored territory. In the great city, in the dimly lit office of an impossibly tall building, two creatures meet. Gold changes hands, and the master of the House of Hellebore gives an order: 'War is coming. The child must die.' In our own world, a young man discovers a manuscript written by his great uncle. It seems to be a novel - a strange fairytale of fantastic creatures and magical realms. But it is written as a diary ... as if the events were real ... as if his uncle had journeyed to another world. For the young man, the fantasy is about to become reality. Find out more about this title and others at www.orbitbooks.co.uk… (more)
Member:SueBentley
Title:The War of the Flowers
Authors:Tad Williams
Info:Orbit (2003), Hardcover, 692 pages
Collections:Your library
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The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams (2003)

  1. 10
    Tithe by Holly Black (Jannes)
    Jannes: Both novels does the "modern faerie" thing, but in very different ways. Both manages a genuine sense of awe and magic, which is rare enough in fantasy today, so they're well worth checking out.
  2. 00
    War for the Oaks by Emma Bull (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Classic urban fantasy, featuring a musician protagonist.
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English (27)  German (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (29)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Two features stand out -- this is an urban fantasy read, but not here in our world, but in 'the city' of the fae. After his mother's death Theo Vilmos, a singer, inherits a journal from his great uncle, Eamonn Dowd. The journal, which he thinks is a work of fiction, is about traveling to a city in fairyland that Dowd names New Erewhon. A city, strange and yet familiar. Theo is aware that, at 30, he is still struggling to grow up; he has always felt incapable of understanding what is expected of him socially although until now he's never examined himself, but after his girlfriend loses a baby and breaks up with him and his mother dies . . . he's ready. THEN he is catapulted into the fae world accompanied by a tiny sprite with a sharp tongue who saves his life and chased by a worse-than-zombie creature WHERE it turns out the bad guys of the elite Flowers want to destroy the mortal world in order to suck all the power out of it into theirs . . . etcetera, plot plot plot . . . and they also really want Theo for some reason. Theo continues to be dense and self-absorbed (unthinkingly, he is not a bad guy) his progress is frustratingly slow but later you realize there is a good reason why. What I enjoyed most were all the varied creatures of fairyland from sprites and nixies to goblins and ogres. The Flower Lords are awful stuck up beautiful elven fairy types, of course, but not all of them, of course. Lots of fun, not Williams' best, but a good read. ***1/2 ( )
  sibylline | Feb 16, 2022 |
It was a good book. Seemed a little less involved than most of his works but that is probably because it was a stand alone novel and not a trilogy as he usually produces. I would read a sequel if there was one. ( )
  aldimartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
It was a good book. Seemed a little less involved than most of his works but that is probably because it was a stand alone novel and not a trilogy as he usually produces. I would read a sequel if there was one. ( )
  Andy_DiMartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
a lot of profanity, a lot. But other than that, a very twisted look at Faerie. Well written and nearly as good as the Otherland series. ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
good reading, good characters, good plot ( )
  Gerardlionel | Apr 1, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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Dedication
This book is dedicated with great love to my wife,
Deborah Beale, who makes my life worth living in more
ways than I can count, let alone list here.

A good marriage and a loving family may not be the
easiest things in the world to create, but I find it hard to
believe there is anything more worth the effort.
It is a Great Adventure, and I share mine
with a wonderful woman.

Deb, you are my personal fairytale ending.
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A single flower, a hellebore, stood in a vase of volcanic glass in the middle of the huge desk, glowing almost radioactively white in the pool of a small, artful spotlight.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

A masterpiece of the imagination, THE WAR OF THE FLOWERS is a truly epic novel that once again pushes the boundaries of fantasy fiction into new and unexplored territory. In the great city, in the dimly lit office of an impossibly tall building, two creatures meet. Gold changes hands, and the master of the House of Hellebore gives an order: 'War is coming. The child must die.' In our own world, a young man discovers a manuscript written by his great uncle. It seems to be a novel - a strange fairytale of fantastic creatures and magical realms. But it is written as a diary ... as if the events were real ... as if his uncle had journeyed to another world. For the young man, the fantasy is about to become reality. Find out more about this title and others at www.orbitbooks.co.uk

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In the great city, in the dimly lit office of an impossibly tall building, two creatures meet. Gold changes hands, and the master of the House of Hellebore gives an order: 'War is coming. The child must die.' In our own world, a young man discovers a manuscript written by his great uncle. It seems to be a novel - a strange fairytale of fantastic creatures and magical realms. But it is written as a diary ...as if the events were real ...as if his uncle had journeyed to another world. For the young man, the fantasy is about to become reality.
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