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The Garden of the Gods by Gerald Durrell
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The Garden of the Gods (original 1978; edition 1978)

by Gerald Durrell

Series: Corfu Trilogy (3)

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5891731,671 (4.12)30
The enchanted island of Corfu was home to Gerald Durrell and his family for five years before the Second World War. For the passionate young zoologist, Corfu was a natural paradise, teeming with strange birds and beasts taht he couldcollect, watch and care for. But life was not without its problems - Gerald's family often objected to his animal collecting activities, especially when the beasts wound up in the family's villa or even worse - the fridge - container.… (more)
Member:sombrio
Title:The Garden of the Gods
Authors:Gerald Durrell
Info:HarperCollins Publishers Ltd (1978), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 196 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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The Garden of the Gods by Gerald Durrell (1978)

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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Durrell has again dug back into his childhood and the four year stint on the Greek island of Corfu for the next installment of his memoir series. This time sister Margo's relationships and brother Leslie's gun obsession take more of a center stage but don't worry, Gerald's "pets" still abound. He still has plenty of stories regarding the mishaps involving animals. Another constant is all of the Durrell children continue to lie to mother and she continues to eat it up, no questions asked, just like one of Gerald's baby birds.
I have to wonder if the family was as fun loving and accepting of the practical jokes and antics as they seem to be? What kind of household welcomes perfect strangers into their home as guests? Especially ones with no intention of leaving? And speaking of guests, what mother would put up with dead birds falling at her feet while she tried to entertain a prominent guest?
All in all, exaggerated antics aside, Garden of the Gods is a charming and funny book. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jun 26, 2020 |
more tales of the Durrell family on Corfu
  ritaer | Mar 14, 2020 |
By this stage I've learnt what to expect from a Gerald Durrell book - there were no great surprises here, but simply a lovely time spent with characters I've come to know and love. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Jun 20, 2019 |
The last in the Durrell trilogy, and I think the best. After reading the series we found the video made in 2007. I very good accounting - preferred it to the most recent PBS version. ( )
  addunn3 | Feb 6, 2019 |
I didn't enjoy this one quite as much as the previous two books in the Corfu Trilogy, and unlike most readers I am more interested in the descriptions of Durrell's activities collecting animals rather than the doings of people, so. It's another collection of stories from the time his family lived on a small Greek island, when he was between the ages of eight and ten, I think. Most of the time he spends wandering the island, wading the lagoon and lake, searching for insects, reptiles, birds and the like to observe their habits and if he can, catch them to take home for his growing collection. In particular he has a pet owl and acquires several new, voraciously hungry owlets, has a variety of snakes, frogs and toads and one wonderful hoopoe- a bird he rescued from a hunter. The incident with the buried puppies was familiar to me, I think because I saw it represented in the film beforehand. Being a fishkeeper myself, I really liked reading about when he caught several brightly-colored gobies during the mating season, installed them in his aquarium, and watched them lay and hatch eggs. There's also a lively battle between a mantis stalking a moth, who is in turn stalked by a fat gecko, when a centipede also goes after the moth- and they are all at the last moment accosted by a hungry toad- to Gerry's indignant consternation (even though the toad itself is one of his pets).

But to me it seemed like the incidents involving people populated this book more than in others. His family is interesting and their endless rotation of visitors equally so. A lot of the characters are very unique and colorful, let's say- and the family's reaction to them is often equally so. They argue a lot- in very amusing conversations- I can't help but wonder now how much of that is accurate, and how much a bit embellished. And while it might seem that the characterizations are a bit flat- mother is always in the kitchen or planning new, lavish meals, his sister is exasperated over boys or involved in sewing, decorating and making sarcastic remarks, his older brothers immersed in their individual interests- firearms and literary pursuits- I remind myself that it's also depicted through the eyes of a child. Of course a ten-year-old who spends they day tramping the island through hot fields and olive groves, coming home hungry, might well think his mother's chief importance in life is to provide great food! Many of the jokes and comments (by visitors and family alike) are a bit scandalous or definitely sexist in nature- especially when it comes from Captain Creech- you think young Gerry doesn't comprehend it all, but he thinks it mighty funny regardless.

from the Dogear Diary ( )
  jeane | Sep 2, 2018 |
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gerald Durrellprimary authorall editionscalculated
Davenport, NigelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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This book is for Ann Peters, at one time my secretary and always my friend, because she loves Corfu and probably knows it better than I do.
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That summer was a particularly rich one; it seemed as if the sun had drawn up a special bounty from the island for never had we had such an abundance of fruit and flowers, never had the sea been so warm and filled with fish, never had so many birds reared their young, or butterflies and other insects hatched and shimmered across the countryside.
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The enchanted island of Corfu was home to Gerald Durrell and his family for five years before the Second World War. For the passionate young zoologist, Corfu was a natural paradise, teeming with strange birds and beasts taht he couldcollect, watch and care for. But life was not without its problems - Gerald's family often objected to his animal collecting activities, especially when the beasts wound up in the family's villa or even worse - the fridge - container.

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Book description
Fauna and Family, also known as The Garden of the Gods, is the third in Durrell's Corfu trilogy that begins with his beloved classic, My Family and Other Animals and continues with Birds, Beasts and Relatives. In his foreword to Fauna and Family, Durrell confessed that in the first two books, "I had left out a number of incidents and characters that I would have liked to have described, and I have attempted to repair this omission in this book . . . I hope that it might give the same pleasure to its readers as apparently its predecessors have done, as for me it portrays a very important part of my life . . . which is a truly happy and sunlit childhood."
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